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Vol. xxxxv 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY JANUARY I, 1920 



$1.50 Per ^ ear 



No 14 



DR. 0. S.CR1SLER 

A Former Burlington Boy Mak- 
ing Good In Tho "Show 
Mo" State. 



Wisconsin's Shamo. 



* 



,Th© following taken from the 
Evening Missourian, Columbia, Mo. 
pertains to the institution of 
which a former citizen of Bur- 
lington, Dr. O S. Crisler, has 
ck»rg» : 

Do you know that the atate scr- 
um farm one mile north or Co- 
lumbia produces enough serum in 
one year to treat 60,000 hogs? 
This sarum is sold to the far- 
mers of Missouri and to veterin- 
ians of the state who use it for 
vaccination purposes at cost of 
production, an allowance being 
made for overhead expenses. 

In other words, the state serum 
farm is self-supporting. Not ' a 
cent has been appropriated by the 
legislature for operating expen- 
ses of the serum factory since 
the plant was built and put in 
operation about six years ago. 
The manager, O. S Crisler, came 
here two years ago to take 
charge of the plant. Since that 
time he has increased t he output 
to a production of 2,000,000 cuNc 
centimeters of serum as com- 
pared to less than half that 
amount two years ago. 

Why is this, factory operated as 
a state owned and state operated 
concern? The Missouri Legislature 
wanted to provide Missouri far- 
mers with anti-hog cholera ser- 
um at a fair cost and serum that 
was absolutely reliable. An ap- 
propriation of $50,000 was made 
so that the College of Agricul- 
ture could produce reliable serum 
for sale to farmers and at the 
same time demonstrate to them 
:the value of vaccination for the 
dreadful malady. 

The worst hog cholera epidemic 
In the recent history of Missouri, 
or of the United States, for that 
matter, was in 1113. If the state 
serum farm had been in full op- 
eration at that time, a great 
many hogs would have been sav- 
ed. 

The capacity of , the state serum 
factory is about twenty to twen- 
ty-five times what it is now 
producing. Five men are employed 
regularly. Serum is produced at 
all months of the year, tho Oc- 
tober la the greatest month for 
vaccination, according to Doctor 
Crisler. 

Such a plant requires about 
200 to 300 head of hogs on the 
factory farm all the time. In the 
course of one year, with the pro- 
duction of the factory as it is 
now run, about 600 heavy hogs and 
600 shoats, weighing about fifty 
pounds each are killed. Last year, 
to be exact, 1,117 hogs were pur- 
chased for serum ana virus pur- 
poses. '~~ 

Only the shoats, or those ani- 
mals used in producing the virus, 
are rendered unfit for meat. 
Three-fourths of the total num- 
ber of hogs killed are sold for 
human consumption. So the ex- 
pense of conducting a serum fac- 
tory Is not so great as might be 
supposed. 

The state's plant now furnishes 
serum to the farmer or the vet- 
erinary for 1.6 cents per cubic 
centimeter. It takes on the av- 
erage , of forty cubic centimeters 
for treatment of one hog 

All modern methods of serum 
making are being followed at 
this factory Enough serum is be- 
ing manufactured to meet the de- 
mand The demand is constantly 
on the Increase, due to education 
of the farmers about treatment 
for cholera Equipment is' being 
added all the time to keep the 
plant up-to-date In every respect 

The product of this factorv goes 
to practically every county in Mis 
souri and is used in the herds of 
at least 2,000 farmers every year 

Missouri farmers are fortunate 
in having a state serum manufac- 
turing plant at Columbia which 
turns out serum at cost and au- 
tomatically acts as a check on 
commercial manufacturers who 
otherwise • might be tempted to 
boost their prices . 

Likes His Now Homo 

Renewing his subscription, 0. 
W. Sandford, of Qlendale, Arizona, 
writes under date of Dec. 24th: 

"Am writing to let you know 1 
am still living this Xraas eve. 
Would like to see all you folks 
back there but would rather see 
you in some other season 'of the 
year. We are having much nicer 
weather so far here than it was 
last year. The roses are in bloom 
and the days are clear and warm. 
The Kentucky colony here are all 
well and happy. I nave fattcied 
up to such an extent that I was 
a dangerous factor at the beauty 
show at the State Pair. 

"Please find enclosed a eheok 
for the Recorder for 1980, ss it 
seems like a letter from home. 
Rest wishes to all our friends 
back East for a Merry Christmas 
and a prosperous New Year.*' 

Badly Afflloted 

J W. Howe, of Hamilton, Ohio, 
writes the Recorder : 

"I'm almost blind Cancer in 
om* eye which affects sight of 
both Inn under X-dtay treat- 
ment now every week at the hos- 
«t»l hers— wss In fWhsnatl un- 
same kind of treatment last 
Jftsr Can sss to read Uitsi** 
■Ostites st a tins*** 

*» ttawe ass a he* of friends 
la thtl county vfco Nrwpathu* 
vtth k*» In Ms sffrMisti, siM 

to Ms 



It is not the unexpected that has 
occurred in the re-election of Vic 
tor Berger to Congress in the 
Fifth Wisconsin District 

When this man, a convict under 
penitentiary sentence for viola- 
tion of -the Esponiage Act, denied 
a seat in the National House of 
Representatives by the vote of 
every member present with a sin- 
gle exception, returned to his 
Milwaukee constituents He re- 
turned to the most notorious 
cessoool ftt ■*»«*£!;*» ?z* "Zt'ir'iw 
ism, pro-Germanism, LaFollette- 
ism, in America; and it was al- 
most a foregone conclusion, that, 
when after an astonishingly im- 
pudent denunciation of American- 
ism in the very face of the 
American Congress, he. went' back 
to Milwaukee and asked for a 
a re-election as an expression of 
contempt and . defiance of tho 
American Congress he would 
have his wish As he is reporteu 
to have said in his canvass,"""!) 
this district is made up of horse 
thieves, then a horse thief is 
its only true representative' Bet 
ger is not a horse thief Horse 
thieves are entitled to hare that 
understood But he Li me true 
representative of the Fifth Wis- 
consin District — Louisville Cour- 
f ler-iJournal 

Victor Berger says his re-elec- 
tion "can not be called exactly a 
victory of the Socialist party' 

He Is quite right The result In 
Milwaukee was a victory for an 
alliance of which Socialists form 
only a part All the disloyal for- 
eign elements of a city in which, 
during the war, sympathy for Ger 
many was more open and Un- 
ashamed, than anywhere else in 
America voted for Berger Friends 
of the kaiser marched to tho 
polls arm in arm with followers 
of Karl Marx in Milwaukee on Fri 
day; the result was the re-elec- 
tion of a man who was' thrown 
out of Congress, not because ho 
is a Socialist, but because he op- 
posed the Government during tho 
war 

If Milwaukee represented any 
considerable part of America, we 
would be in/ for a bad time* As 
a matter of fact the anti-Amer- 
ican ^riumph or Friday is one of 
those incidents • which occur, in- 
evitably, now and then, in acoun- I 
try which has filled up as rap- 
idly as our own with people of 
alien stock Most of the newcom- 
ers have taken kindly to our In- 
stitutions and have become thor- 
oughly good Americans But here 
and there scattered over the coun 
try, are communities whose ideas 
of government have nothing in 
common with the ideas which ac- 
tuated. Washington and Lincoln 
Fortunately these communities ars 
not numerous enough or big 
enough to have any considerable 
influence upon the attitude of the 
nation That they exist, however. 
is T:raTBt that cannot he dodged 
—Cincinnati Times-Star 

Thrift the Slogan 

For All tho Pooplo. 

Thrift and then . more thrift in 
the slogan that is being thrown 
forward in anticipation of the 
new year's program. The savings 
division of the U. S Treasury De 

Sartment is maturing plans for a 
ational Thrift Week beginning 
January 17, 1920. The purpose of 
the week says . Washington is to 
start the New Year with a sound 
financial program for every indi- 
vidual household. Wm. M. Lewis, 
director of the savings division, 
says: "We must refrain from 
unnecessary and extravagant 
spending if we are to bring pri- 
ces down. Having saved money, It 
is essential that the individual in- 
vest safely. To this end we urge 
continued investment in govern- 
ment securities, on which steady 
and good interest returns are as- 
sured, with full return of princi- 
pal.'' 

It is a duty put upon all cit- 
izens at this time to cut living 
costs as much as possible. Chil- 
dren should be taught a sense 
of money values by sharing to 
some extent in the family fiana- 
cial problems and acquiring a 
knowledge of costs. Thrift should 
be. the slogan in the factory, the 
business house and on the farm. 
In the home and school, at the 
club, and reaching even to all so- 
cial relationships, extravagance 
should defer to economy, waste- 
fulness to saving, consumption to 
production. It Is a duty that 
each of us owes to the other 
and that all of us owe to so- 
ciety at large. Profiteering flour- 
ishes in the very presence of 
prosecution, but It can not main- 
tain its sinister position in the 
presence of production reinforc- 
ed by personal restraint m the 
midst of plenteousness, 

George W. Terrlll has purchased 
the Moore farm of fifty acres in 
North Bend bottoms' in Boone 
county. Tho place is part of the 
original Harrison tract 



FISCAL COURT DOINGS 

Delinquent Poll-tax List Passed 
Upon, Several Claims Al- 
lowed, Etc., Eto. 

The Fiscal Court was in special 
session last Saturday with the 
County Judge presiding and all 
the Justices of the Peace present 
except Esq. Charles A. Wilson, of 
Rabbit Hash. 

T-iiy fotu/winif is a »v iu/psi.-» »»r 
the business transacted: 

Howard Tanuci was refunded 
12.65 taxes paid on erroneous as- 
sessment. 

L. A. Conner, Sheriff, allowed 
$6.25 for book bought for his of- 
fice. 

L. A. Conner, Sheriff, allowed 
$393.75 for services ss jmt bill 
rendered. 

C. A. Fowler, Jailer, was al- 
lowed $6.90 as per bllf rendered. 

W. L. Ridded was allowed $83 
for publishing settlement with 
Sheriff, etc 

C. J. Helm asked the county to 
reimburse him to the extent of 
11.45 per yard for the crushea 
stone he had to ship from High 
Bridge lor the construction of 
tho Walton and Verona pike, the 
High Bridge stone costing him 
that much more per yard than the 
local stone he Was able to secure. 
The court took time on the prop- 
osition. 

The Sheriff submitted his delin- 
quent poll tax list which was ex- 
amined by the court which allow- 
ed him 652 delinquents. 

Came L. A. Conner, sheriff, and 
presented his delinquent list of 
personal property, county and 
State, and it is ordered by the 
court that he be released on 
county taxes on a valuation of 
$12,799 personal property, ana 
from State taxes on a valuation 
of $10,638 personal property ana 
livestock on a valuation of $4,- 
870. 

The road proposition applying 
to the county generally was un- 
der discussion at times, and it 
seemed tho concensus of opinion 
on the part of the Justices la; 
that it will be proper to let no 
more contracts for the construc- 
tion of roads until those now 
complete be put in better re- 
pair. The Richwood and Beaver 
pike came in for a general dis- 
cussion. 



Farmers' Week at Lexington 

Agriculture and live stock breed 
ingf ace new conditions In 1920 
and- new .conditions require new 
methods. Farmer's Weeks brings 
together at the State Experiment 
Station the farmers of Kentucky 
and puts them directly in touch 
with the best agriculturalists and 
live s to c k br eeders of the State 
and gives them directly the re- 
sults of many important experi- 
ments conducted in the Experi- 
ment Station. It provides the op- 
portunity for farmers and breed- 
ers to confer with one another 
so that the best methods of each 
may be put into practice in all 
parts of the State. 

The greatly increased land val- 
ues now prevailing necessitates 
tfxe adoption of better systems of 
farm management. The latest and 
most improved farm methods will 
be presented, by well informea 
speakers. The farmer who at- 
tends this big farmers' conven- 
tion will not only be put in 
touch with . the latest sources of 
Information in the experiment sta 
tlons but will come in contact with 
hundreds of farmers who are 
meeting the same problems that 
confront him. 

Every farmer and his family is 
invited to attend these meetings 
which are the most important far- 
mers' conference of the year. 
Those in charge of the program 
expect between 1,000 and 1,500 far 
mors. 

All the various live stock assoc- 
iations of the State are planning 
to hold meetings and the stock 
Judging contests will be a fea- 
ture, of incalculable value to all in 
attendance. 

' These are a few of the reasons 
why every farmer of Kentucky 
should attend Farmers' Week, at 
Lexington, January 37-29. There 
are many others. Think it over 
and ask yoursrlf if you can af- 
ford »to fail to obtain the in- 
formation and suggestions for 
meeting problems of 1920 offered 
you at Kentucky Farmers' Week. 



Spesdy Presswork in 1403 

England and the United States 
share the distinction of owning 
the odlest set of metal type bear- 
big Chinese figures in the world, 
a part of the set being in one 
country and a part in the other ; 
and a recent description goes back 
into the ancient history of that 
much-talked about country, Ko- 
rea, for . there It was, at least 
as long ago as 1403, that separate 
types of metal were invented. In 
that early time the type was 
"^t. !_ _: » , V*«mw»x .the aur- 
fafce was covered with ink, a Bheet 
of paper laid across the upturnea 
faces of the characters, knd the 
printing done by brushing the pa- 
per lightly with a cloth. The 
printer, if he was efficient, could 
make as many as 1,500 impressions 
a day, but he doubtless worked 
more than eight hours, and his 
method certainly would not have 
gone far in getting out a modern 

f newspaper. But the Korean inven- 
_ tion was an improvement over the 
printing form engraved tablets, 
and later from wooden blocks that 
had been practiced in Chi.ia in tho 
second century, A. D. and also ov, 
er the 'movable types of clay 
which the Chinese inventor, Pi 
Sheng, made in the eleven Lh cen- 
tury. 

• -» — — ■^eeoOjaai as— ■ 

Canadian Farmer Profits 

From Advertising Crops. 

Does advertising pay the far- 
mer? Judiciously done it decided- 
ly does. Read what Frank Pyle 
says: 

"The question is best answered 
by giving tho results of some of 
my campaigns. TMb year I had 
three hundred crates of cherries 
on the trees. When they were 
ready to be picked I ran a four 
and one-half inch advertisement 
in the country paper. Within three 
days after the ad appeared there 
was not a cherry left on the 
trees and I had $924.36 in my 
pocket for my share of the crop. 

•'The advertising cost only $4.25 
and the total cost to me was 
only $83.06. It would be hard to 
estimate the cost of hiring the 
cherries picked, hauling them to 
town and other expenses of sell- 
ing that way. I doubt if I could 
have obtained enough help to 
pick them. 

"To sell my apple crop during 
the year February, 1918, to Febru- 
ary, 1919, I ran advertisements in 
nine local papers. Nearly all fruit 
was sold at the farm. In.this wav 
I sold $9,511.21 worth of apples 
at a cost for advertising of only 
$201.63 or 2.1 per cent of the re- 
turna. It would have cost at least 
5 per cent to have hauled them 
to town not counting the time 
away from the work of the 
farm. 

"Some of my advertising has 
seemingly fallen flat. Some of it 
has produced good results Immed- 
iately. All of it has helped to 
build up a reputation for my 
farm. In one instance an adver- 
tisement that I considered a fail 
ure brought me a customers year 
later, who told me this ad had 
brought him. He came from twen- 
ty miles away and since that 
time has purchased more than 
three hundred dollars worth of 
fruit.''— Montreal Family Herald 
and Weekly Star. 



QUICK ACTION 

SAVED BUILDING 

Christmas Festivities Cams 

Noar Being Followed by 

a Disastrous Fire. 



tSSi 



Ition 



DELCO-UGHT 



. Usstrls Lift* sad 
rewst Piss* 

KUu'trlo light «iiu power for ISM than 
you aro p»yln« for poor light. 



A_^^ n r\ 




PHANK A. 
f*at» IS tftfes-U 



tfBSfc 



rhmmm 



A SHORTAGE IN CATTLE 

Chicago.— A shortage of 1,000,- 
000 cattle in 1919 will cause high 
prices for beef and beef prodcuts 
for at leaat seven years, M. F. 
Horine, statistician 'for the Un- 
ion Stock Yards, declared in his 
annual report today. 

Mr. Horine said it would be im- 
possible to cover the shortage of 
1919 before 19*7, and that the De- 
partment of Agriculture's report 
concerning the number of cattle 
In the United States was "too op- 
timistic.'' 

An increase of 377,000 animals of 
all kinds received at the Union 
Stock Yards for 1419 over 1918 
was reported. Cattle receipts, how 
ever, aecrsssoi tftt.ooo. 

Decreases in cattle laughter al- 
so was reported by the markets 
is Kansas tit*-, Omaha, St. Joseph 
sad Siouk City 



The Jtsalyck 
«o*)VeS» ir 

SftsJorltv.,1 
DsfBoerafi 
two* 




UUtur* will 

In the 

**»e 

tie 

* or 



Th*» new Catholic church building 
at Florence came very nearly be- 
ing destroyed by fire immediately 
following the Christmas exercises 
ttgecs list Tfcur-day. It «?%s ahnut 
noon and the congregation, ex- 
cept Rev. Connelly and three lad- 
ies had dispersed when the .ire 
got its start. 

Among the representations for 
the Christmas exercises was a min 
iature manger representing the 
one in which Christ was born, in 
the arrangement of the manger 
and its surroundings considerable 
hay, straw and raw cotton had 
been used, and among this com- 
bustible material an electric bull) 
dropped and a lively blaze re- 
sulted insfcantur, and- threatened 
the destruction of the handsome 
church ediiice, which would un- 
doubtedly have been the result 
had it not been for a supply of 
extinguishing powder kept in the 
church to be used on Just such 
occasion, and which Rev. Connel- 
ly was quick to remember was at 
hand and which he used in a most 
successful manner. 

The three ladies who were In 
the church with Rev. Connelly 
were very much excited, for 
which they had good cause. 

The exercises held by the church 
were exceedingly interesting and 
instructive, but much of the pleas- 
ure they had afforded the four 
persons who saw the threatened 
fire were eliminated temporarily 
at least. 



Tobacco Stolon in Grant. 



Joe Jackson, of Grant county, 
brought 590 pounds of tobacco to 
this city in a wagon last Thurs- 
day night and sold it at the Pen- 
dleton Loose Lesf Tobacco Ware- 
house on Friday for $144.17 A. 

Grant county farmer discovered 
that a quantity of his tobacco 
had been stolen from his barn 
and was not long In finding that 
his tobacco had been sold here. 
On his way to this city he met 
Jackson on the road returning to 
Grant county, and the young man 
confessed and produced all the 
money but 98 cents which he had 
spent. The owner of the tobac- 
co came on to this city to claim 
the tobacco, but he was too late, 
as the weed had been scattered. 
He registered a kick that the to- 
bacco did not bring enough money 
but this contention could not be 
established.— Falmouth Outlook. 

A Wild Ride. 

John Walton had. rather a wild 
ride a few days sgo when his 
large touring ear skidded down a 
steep hill backwsrda. It got a 
start and the ground, which was 
covered with grass, was frosen, 
and, despite the fact that the 
hind wheels were revolving for- 
ward at a terrific sDeed, the 
car slid down the hill. Fortu- 
nately he got it stopped just as 
it waa about going over a steep 
bank which would have been ae-. 
companied by a disastrous result. 
It required considerable labor to 
get the car back Into the road. 

Bought a Nice Homo 

Earl Walton has bought and 
moved into the H K. Fisher prop- 
erty in Petersburg, the propertv 
that was Improved by the late .«. 
Frank Grant many years ago for 
a home It is about the most 
commodious and desirable resi- 
dential property Is the town and 
Mr and Mrs Walton are to be 
courstulated on obtnUiiaar so de- 
sirable a kosae Mrs. Walton** 
fsther, Q a. Ouffhes ass given 
up the Ulea of going to AH son n 
and will nsske bis home with her 
and Mr Wslto*. 



High Price Paid for Land 

What is said to be the highest 
price ever paid for Tand in 
Bourbon county, Ky., was paid for 
a tract of ten acres of tobacco 
land near Paris at $1,350. The land 
was purchased from Charles Ped- 
dicord by Wm. H. Whaley. Mr Pea 
dicord paid $909 per acre for this 
land two years ago. Re has sold 
from it in two years about S6,- 
000 worth of tobacco and still 
has this season's crop to dis- 
pose of. 

Some Reasons for Sur- 
rendering the Railroads 

Soon the railroads will be re- 
turned to their owners, let us 
hope. Then we may not tako 
the same interest in their salary 
lists as we do now while the gov 
ernment is in charge; and yet we 
should, for after all, as usuaf, it 
is the people who pay them. We 
do know that it has cost the 
country a lot of money to run 
the roads just a little while. 
Some of the reasons are set forth 
in seme salary data furnished the 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
on past pay-rolls. Here we are in- 
formed that the salary of the 
President of the largest railroad 
in the country was 975,460, and 
that the same road paid eleven 
Vice Presidents salaries ranging 
from *40,620 down to $25,-S»M>, while 
other officers and attorneys were 
paid salaries of $20,000 and up, 
making a total amounting to 
$681,960. A President of a city 
railway company received a sal- 
ary of $112,000. Receiverships are 
notoriously costly, some amount- 
ing to $104,000 and even $130,000. 
Seven leading railroads paid their 
Presidents $75,000 or more. There 
were some $60,000 men and others 
receiving from $30,000 to $50,000 a 
year. All of which is in ample 
explanation of why the govern- 
ment Is glad to surrender this 
hay-bating elephant.— Commercial 
Tribune, 



The Man Who Makes 

Good With Hogs. 

\mong many farim that have 
change! hands there aro those 
which heretofore have had very 
few hogs kept on them, but now 
this branch will be an important 
part of the work. The results ob- 
tained by those who are starting 
into th;> hog business depends 
very much upon the selection of 
I the brood sows and of the Ixjarto 
i which they are to b;* bred and 
! also the management of the dam 
anU ^!< ~'ir -offssrtes. - Nearly- ail > 
farmers of today underst iaa the 
I Importance of starting right, but 
I it frequently happens thai in ee- 
; lecting a breeding animal if just 
j such an animal as tho farmer 
knows that he should have cannot 
conveniently be had, ho is easily 
persuaded that something e ls e will 
answer the nurpose. This is the 
wrong course to take in the se- 
lection of a dam, and Is also 
wrong and fraught with more ser^- 
ious consequences in the selection 
of a sire. The boar should always 
be the best that can be obtained, 
^he best as to himself and the 
best in ancestral lines. Only those 
that are absolutely pure in their 
breeding can be relied upon to 
transmit to their offspring the 
features that ar? desired. Every 
farmer is taking chances when he 
uses a grade boar, as the pure 
bred sire surely insures the qual- 
ity of Jhe litter to a rouchjjreat 
er extent. The breeder who is 
careful and particular enough to 
secure the right beginning of his 
herd is not apt to fall into amy 
v erv serious errors in caring for 
it. 

The man who stands by the hog 
all the time is the one who 
knows how to make the business 
pay, and here are some of his 
methods. He has good, well ven- 
tilated shelter for his hogs. He 
feeds at regular hours, and the 
troughs are always empty when 
the nogs have finished their meals 
yet they sseem satiisfied. He has 
feeding floor and keeps it clean. 
He has provided a winter's supply 
of roots and some pumpkins, for 
he knows that In connection with 
grain, these things have nutritive 
value, which he cannot afford, to 
overlook. He knows how much his 
hogs are paying for the corn ana 
other feeds which they eat ana 
kr.ows that he should 'market 
them when they do not pay the 
market price for it, at least. His 
hogs are not wasting flesh root- 
ing in the ground for alkalies to 
aid digestion, for he provides salt, 
charcoal and ashes for them .at 
all times. He has his fall litters 
separate from the spring pigs 
and feeds the first milk and a 
mixed nation that will develop 
bone and muscle and not fat, 
which is not what they want at 
that time.-C N. Y, 

Handled Many Pelts 

Herbert Kirkpstrick, Iocs! dealer 
In furs, has handled a large-num- 
ber of pelts this season among 
which were very few skunk ow- 
ing to the fact that nearly all 
the skunk in this county died 
last, winter, some say of flu. The 
furs this winter have brought a 
considerable sum of money to the 
trappers in this county as the 

prices hav e been cons id erably 

higher than heretofore. 



Big 



Increase. 

The amount of property in this 
county on which tax will be paid 
this year is nearly a million dol- 
lars greater than it waa in 1919, 
To be exact Boone's assessment 
in 1918 was $12,092,295, while for 
1919 it is *13,050,895. The county 
will be fortunate if the high prices 
for which land has been selling 
here the past year does not result 
in the State Tax Commission giv- 
ing the county another boost. Tax 
Commissioner Riley has done his 
part towards avoiding any raise 
by the powers that be at Frank- 
fort, and there ia no question 
but what Boone county lands are 
taxed on as high a valuation ac- 
cording to their real value as any 
county in the State. 



Rylo-Stophons 

A marriage license was obtained 
Saturday afternoon by John S. 
Ryle, 26, and Stella B. Stephens, 
26. They were married in Coving- 
ton. The contracting parties are 
both residents of Tarlton pre- 
cinct, the groom being a son of 
the late Walter Ryle, and the 
bride a daughter of Ernest L,. 
Stephens. They are both very 
popular young people in their 
neighborhood. 



Give "Bird" a Rest 



of 



fhsOlvsa sad wtr*. 
Comsmtassey aetffcfawh*** enter- 
t silted shout fwsvty of their 
relsttvss at 



their 



Another Largo Acreage 

If there Is nothing occurring in 
the future to prevent Boone coun- 
ty will pitch s very lsrge crop 
of tobacco in 1920 The pHcesfor 
which tobacco has been selling 
on the markets this winter is an 
incentive that will not down and 
about every available piece of 
land that will produce tobacco 
will be planted It is hardty 
probable that as UimY h (Til s 
crop will be produced again In 
many years an the crop uow be- 
ing marketed consists of frost 
bitten, rotten, house burnt- in 
fact, it has about ail . the ills 
known to the cro|>, but it Is 
bringing the growers, as a rule, 
fancy prices 

Lute Bradford sold MO pounds 
of tobacco on the Covington mat* 
ket last week that avsrsged him 
TO wnts a pound. Us wss • *prf 
much plessod with the pries aWO 
the trsstassot he received at the 
».>«.iaft«»u keuss> 



Of all the by^words or slang 
that has ever been introduced the 
word "bird'' that is being worked 
over time is about the most in- 
appropriate Some have become 
so addicted to its use that they 
render themselves ludicrous, not 
being able to utter two sentences 
in succession without using the 
word "bird'' one or more times 
Give "bird'' a rest 

Important Notice 

Parties who desire a license for 
their dogs and do not have time 
to come to my office will please 
make their application by Basil, 
giving a description of the dog 
as required by law and enclosing 
a two-cent postage stamp for 
mailing the license. 

W. R. ROGERS, 

County Clerk. 

Would Make a Good Secretary 

Jerry Fowler was busy several 
days last week mailing out litera- 
ture in the interest of the Coun- 
ty l«'ai'in Bureau which is in pro- 
cess of organisation in this coun- 
ty If the bureau requires the 
regular services of n sscretsry 
after It is in operation Mr Fow- 
. ler will fit the position ensetQ/ 

wiNiaai hnnojuo Dead 

ry co hear of Ms dsstti at his 
tieme in Los AHsetes, Osls* a*>v 
mi lilt He went W 



I 



U> ISM sad married 

▼ss Ayssk is ism 0> tears* 

•aaa^n* l»w tvMBOjBBBBB> 




THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1920 



BOONS COUNTY RJCCORDIR 






WALTON. 



►••- | and Craig insists that he dici 
• ; siffn thom. Craig is- married and 



♦ 



•pent 

fuest 
lroy 
Mrs 
days 



sign 

is a young man 



who has been , 



well connected heretofore. 



Jno. L. Vest and Bamett Franks 
spent Tuesday at Williamstown on 
business. 

Mr, and Mrs. John E. Williams 
and son, John, of Covington, vis- 
ited friends here a part of last 
week. 

Cloyd Taylor, who is attending 
the State College at Lexington, 
spent tho holidays here with, 
home folks 

Geo McElroy of Indianapolis, 
part of the holidays here* 
of his father, Thomas Mc- 
and family 

H. C. Diers spent the holl- 
at Silver Grove, Campbell 
county, guest of her daughter, 
Mrs Chas, T. Best, 

Geo Stephens, of Sharpsburg, 
Bath county, spent . part of tiie 
nu»»<-«j-*"**ere aim in mniun ci«u 
ty with relatives and friends 

Rev. R. L. Shirley and Mrs, Shir- 
ley and children are enjoying the 
holiday vacation with friends ana 
relatives in Garrard and Boyle 
counties. 

Mr and Mrs. L. R, Miller, Mrs, 
Addie Burrows, Mr and Mrs. Geo. 
L Miller, all of Landing, spent 
Sunday here, guests of Mr. anu 
Mrs John C. Miller, 

Mrs W. E, Brown and three chil 
dren left last week for their olu 
home at Horse Cave, Hart county, 
to spend the holidays with h^V 
mother and other relatives 

Mrs. Roxie Cleek and Mrs. Liz- 
zie Carpenter are enjoying a de- 
lightful visit to Huntington, West 
Va., where they are tne guests 
of Mrs. Cleek's brother Kenneth 
M. Aylor and family. 

Mr. and Mis. E. L, Aultof In- 
dianapolis, spent the holidays here 
with her parents Mr and Mrs. 
Chaa H. Poor, who returned home 
with them to spend several 
weeks, making the trip in their 
automobile 

Mrs D. B, Wallace left Tuesday 
for Indianapolis, Ind, to spenu 
the week with her brother Dr 
Guilford A Mottier, and may 
visit her brother Prof David M. 
Mottier at the State University at 
Bloomington. 

R. H. Sipple and brother Floyd, 
who recently sold their farms 
have bought a grocery store in 
Newport, and will move there in 
a short time They had a deli- 



RICHWOOD. 



cacy for their Christmas feast a 
fine watermelon raised by Estill 
Sipp^ on his farm on the Beaver 
road; 

Rev. J. D. Waters has been call- 
ed to take charge of a large 
Christian church in a good sized 
city in Texas at a salary of $1,- 
800 per annum and will leave this 
weea to enter on his work. Mrs. 
Waters and children will leave 
for their new home in a short 
time. 

Rev. Geo. E. Owen of Loving- 
ton, Illinois, spent last week here 
with members of the Christian 
church and preached to that con 
gregation Sunday morning ana 
evening, making a good impres- 
sion, but it Is doubtful if he will 
be employed as pastor to fill' the 
present vacancy 

The W. C. T. U, was given, a 
reception by the President Mrs 
Jos B. Allen Saturday in honor 
of Mrs Alice Booth who had been 
unable to attend for more than 
a year. Refreshments were serv- 
ed and a delightful afternoon was 
spent by the ladies in discussion 
and social intercourse 

Mr and Mrs. Scott Chambers 
and daughters, Misses Aileen and 
Mary, entertained Sunday with a 
fine dinner, the guests being H 
H Huston of Anchorage, Mr. and 
Mrs Chas. W. Ransler, Missed Es- 
telle, Mary, and Lucia Ransler, 
BenJ B. Allphln, John Lewis Wil- 
liams and Wallace Grubbs 

Mr, and Mrs. J. Wilmot Kinslear 
of Louisville, spent part of the 
holidays here with her parents, 
Mr, and Mrs. Jno. C, Miller, Mr, 
Kinslear has been promote d to 
the management of the office - of 
the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co 
at Memphis, Tenn , where he will 
move next week 

Jack Arnold Day of Falmouth 
and Miss Katherine Webb of Will- 
iamstown, were united in marri- 
age at the residence of the of- 
ficiating minister Kev. R. F. De- 
Moisey of the Baptist church last 
Wednesday, and the young couple 
will make their home at Falmouth. 
The bride is a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. G. S. Webb and was 
the bookkeeper in the bank of 
Williamstown, and is a most lov- 
able young lady. 

Fred Miller came in from Bloom 
ington, Indiana, Saturday, where 
he has been assisting in the man- 
agement of the stores known as 
"The Fair'' owned by him, C Mil- 
ton Richey and Raymond M Ren- 
aker They sold $10,000 .in the 
first twenty-four days of this 
month and have had a wonderful 
success in the business, the store 
doing nearly double the business 
it did under previous manage- 
ment Mr Miller left Wednesday 
to take up his territory in Ar- 
kansas as traveling salesman for 
the Mishawaka Woolen Mf£ Co., 
and Milton Richey left for Colo, 
and New Mexico on a similar mis- 
sion for the Mishawaka Co 

Deputy Sheriff B. B. Hume was 
here the first of the week on 
business and succeeded in arrest- 
ing Beartley Craig, colored, who 
is charged with forgery, having 
signed the name of O. D. Will- 
iams to about twenty checks for 
various sums, aggregating about 
WOO. It is also alleged that he 
signed the name of Walter Sleet 
to a note for $100 payable at 
the Equitable Bank and Trust Co., 
on whom ,the chocks wore drawn, 
i'ralf was taken to Hurllngtom 
apd lodged In jail and will have 
■ preliminary hearing Friday. He 
worked for far. Williams a couple 

BTtto liberty 



The entertainment at Richwood 
school house was splendid 

Mrs S. T. Hill is visiting rela- 
tives in her old Virginia home, 

Paschal Conner, of Vanceburg, 
is the guest of his brother, J- 
B, 

Henry Carpenter has purchased 
a house ana shop of W H. Lu- 
cas - 

Mrs Susie Adams gave the 
young folks a hop last Friday 
evening 

Herbert Barnes, formerly of 
near here, was buried at Florence 
last week 

spent several days here the past 
week with friends 

Robt Robinson and Duke Wil- 
son purchased the farm sold re- 
cently by Mr. Robinson. 

Robert Stephens, who has been 
.practicing dentistry in Tennessee, 
is at home for a few days 

William Carpenter, wife and 
son, Wayne, have returned to 
their home in Hamilton, Ohio. 

C D. Tanner and Albert Tanner 
and family spent last Sunday "at 
Price Conner's in Independence 

We wish all those who are tak- 
ing the Recorder and all those 
who should take it a happy New 
Year, 

"Stanley Carpenter, son of Wm 
Carpenter and wife, of Hamilton, 
Ohio, was .buried at Richwood lasl 
Sunday i 

The oyster supper held at Ken- 
sington school house cleared $18 55 
to help pay for .the Sunday 
School organ 

Fowler Lodge elected the fol- 
lowing officers: J W. Criswell, N. 
G ; C. D. Tanner, V, G,; Walter 
Grubbs, Secretary; L L. Weaver, 
Treasurer 

William Lancaster, 83, died at 
his home in Camp Washington, 
•Ohio He was born and raised in 
this neighborhood, and moved to 
Ohio a few years ago Burial at 
Highland 

Wiley Grubbs, of Mlddletown, O, 
spent the weeks' end here with 
his parents His children, who 
had been visiting their grand- 
parents for two months, return- 
ed home with him 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

* « 

* BIO BONE. « 

* ♦ 



Rev. C, L. Bohon, Jr., Presiding 
Elder, of the Frankfort District, 
will hold services at the Big 
Bone Methodist church Sunday 
morning, Jan. 4th, at 11 o'clock. 
The pastor Rev. D. E. Bedinger, of 
Walton, will preach at night. A 
cordial Invitation is extended all 
to attend both services. 



VISITED WALTON 

FOR NO GOOD. 



Last Monday three strange men, 
one of them chauffeur, arrived 
in Walton in an automobile. They 
were inquiring for a man namea 
Cooper, of whom none of the 
citizens of Walton had any know 
ledge. The machine was driven 
to the L. & N. depot, when one 
of the men got out of the ma- 
chine and walked down the tract 
towards Verona a considerable dis 
tance. When he came back the 
chauffeur heard him remark to 
his companion, "there is nothing 
doing tonight.'' This remark ex- 
cited the suspicion of the chauf- 
feur who said nothing until he 
returned to Cincinnati with the 
men when che notified the police 
of what he had seen and heard 
while out with the men. The. po- 
lice soon had them in custody ana 
found on each man a mask and 
a gun. They were lodged in the 
city bastile and their trial set 
for Wednesday at 9 o'clock. 

The citizens of Walton are con- 
siderably excited over the visit 
of the strangers, believing that 
a big robbery had been pianmea 
for their town, but, fortunately 
was frustrated. 

Deputy Sheriff Hume, who was 
at Walton, Tuesday. Investigating 
the visit of the strangers, wenlt 
to Cincinnati, yesterday, to be 
present at the trial of the two 
men who the police had under 
arrest. 

H. Schanker & Son, the popular 
Erlanger merchants, remembered 
the Recorder force in a very 
handsome manner, Christmas, 'as 
has been their custom for b«v-« 
eral years. Schanker & Son are 
drawing on Boone county for a 
very handsome trade and is a 
good, reliable firm. 

Rev. H. C. Thomas of Newport, 
will preach at the Petersburg t/L 
K. church Sunday morning, Jan. 4, 
morning and evening, and every- 
body is cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



Mrs. Sadie Smith, wife of 11. W. 
Smith, died at her home In Erlan- 
ger, Tuesday. Funeral services at 
Erlanger Baptist church at 1 :45 
Wednesday. Burial at Spring 
Grove cemetery. 



The Recorder is in receipt of a 
lengthy obituary for Mrs. R. C. 
McNeely, but the writer failed to 
sign hi* or her name. 



KENTUCKY NEWS. 

important Events Transpiring 
Throughout tho State. 



Mfc Olivet— Ezra Whight, of 
the Pinhook pike, found a skunk 
den near Chapel from which he 
took 22 of the varmints 

Lawrenceburg— Mrs Fan'nl? Saun 
ders, 71, received fatal burns when 
her shoulder shawl caught fire 
as she was lighting a lamp 

Georgetown— J M. Padgett, coun 
ty assessor, planted eight vacant 
lots in tobacco and has sold the 
yield at a net profit of $1400, 

Frankfort— Thousands of "No 
Smoking'' placards being distrib- 
uted from the insurance depart- 
ment .will obtain lower rates for 
policy holders 

Vanceburg — Jack Hendrickson, 

pointed census taker, this to 
make the fourth census he has 
taken 

Mt Sterling— T. R. Mansfield, of 
the Howards Mill vicinity, killea 
a fox while hunting, and the 
next day caught a hass weighing 
six pounds 

Georgetown— William B Jones, 
Stamping Ground, disabled in the 
war, has received $1200 in back 
allowances and will receive $100 
per month pension 

Hopkinsvilie — Negroes took pos 
session of a coal train near town, 
driving off the train erew When 
a posse arrived several bushels 
had been thrown off All es- 
caped except one 

Carrollton— Pursuant to cam- 
paign pledges, the bipartzan coun 
cil have cut their own pay from 
*8 to $3 per meeting and re- 
duced the salary of the city 
treasurer to $500 a year 

Mt. Sterling— A 'posse who made 
a raid in Powell county found 14 
mashbarrels and arrested John 
Myers, but were unable to locate 
a still reputed to be the largest 
in the mountains. 

Clark County.— Farmers are pay 
ing tobacco strippers from $3.50 to 
94.00 per hundred pounds, but it 
is difficult to get them even at 
these prices. Very good prices 
Very good prices have been paid 
for tobacco on our markets, the 
top being $1.20, the average was 
around 50 cents. Not enough at- 
tention has been given to the 
grading of tobacco, which is said 
to be due, partly, to having in- 
experienced strippers, and this of 
course, brings the average down 

Fayette County.— The prices ob- 
tained for farm products, espec- 
ially tobacco, has been echoed In 
an unusual amount of Christmas 
cheer and celebrations were more 
general, and Old Santa more lib- 
eral than for a number of years. 
Land for tobacco is already at a 
premium and prices seem to 
mount daily. Wheat and rye look 
well. The feeding of cattle is on 
in earnest. The enow covered 'up 
the grass and fodder was fed ear- 
ly this week. Much tobacco was 
bulked down and stripping will 
be pushed wherevUr labor can be 
secured. 

Bourbon County.— With the cloa 
ing of tobacco markets should 
come a rest period for the iar- 
mers, with only the necessary feed 
ing of stock, but the high prices 
of tobacco and other farm pro- 
ducts have swelled the pocket- 
books of our farmers and they 
have been as busy shopping as 
they were stripping and hauling 
tobacco a week ago. Whenever 
they have a spare minute from 
the business of shopping they are 
preparing tobacco for the early 
January sales. The planning for 
the crop of 1920 and the price 
at which the present crop should 
sell, gives the growers a topic for 
conversation that never ceases to 
prove interesting. It is now too 
early to venture at an estimate 
of the scope and extent of the 
1920 crop, but farmers seem to be 
planning as great an acreage as 
fast summer" and many who have 
not grown tobacco heretofore to 
any extent, are talking of going 
about it in earnest this year; so 
from present indications, the 
acreage should equaf if not ex- 
ceed fhe 1919 acreage. Wheat and 
rye are in good condition. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

• ♦ 

• BELLBVIBW. • 

• ♦ 

Joe Maurer remains quite ill. 

Mrs. Alice Cook spent Saturday 
night with Mrs. Joshua Rice. 

Sheldon Flick, of Lexington Col- 
lege, is home for the Xmas( hol- 
idays. 

Mrs Eugenia Clore was 
guest of Mrs. Bell Cason, 
day and Monday. 

Chas. White and family, o 
ersburg, spent Sunday with 
and Mrs, T. W, Cook, 

Mrs A. Rogers and son 
lest Sunday in Cincinnati with" Mr. 
and Mrs. E. Studenberg, 

Ed. Maurer, of Pittsburg, Penn., 
was called here last week owing 
to the illness of his father. 

Misses Laura Rogers and Mis- 
souri Walton, of Georgetown Col- 
lege, are spending their Christmas 
vacation here. 

The bazaar and supper given 
by the Christian church last Sat- 
urday evening, was a derided sue 
cess, the net proceeds were $130.90 
and the members wish to express 
their thanks and appreciation to 
each and every one that contrib- 
uted or assisted in any way to 
make it a success. 



1 












* 




"1 






















• 




4 


i 
















To our many Friends who 



by their Liberal Patronage 
have made the past year 
one of the most Successful 
of our Business Life we wish 
to you a-Happy and Prosper- 
ous New Year. 

GULLEY & PETTIT, 

# 

Burlington, Ky. 



v 




si 



ii 



«j 



-* 



GST *;,,i£' •£££ $> 




This week's sale* 
were somewhat off, 



of tobacco 



Ag«ni 

•hi. Address 



J**- IB- 



WANTED 



QWk 



■rh££ 



MO 



the 

Sun- 



Mr. 
spent 



Goode & Dunkie 

280 Lbs. Ohio River Salt * $2.50 

5 Gallon Can New Orleans Molassess $7.50 

The Best you ever tasted. 

100 Lbs. Best Michigan Navy Beans $8.00 

60 Lb. Box Work's Tag Soap... $6.25 

14 Gallon Keg Kraut......... - $6.75 

47 Lb. Can Patridge Brand Pure Hog Lard 3 $12.75 

ARCADE FLOUR, Barrel $13.00 

Dried Apples, per pound • . 25c 

Golden Blend Coffee, lb ~ . * 45c 

$2.00 worth sent postpaid. 

START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT, SEND US YOUR ORDER 

— AND SAVE MONEY L_ 




andMunKies 



GRO CEPIES. FL OUR SEED S . MEDICINES 
13-2/ PIKE ST. /S 20W.7I»ST. 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

— ' Phones South 338 and 336. 

United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Pood Administration License No. G-1770. 



Hardly a distiller or wholesale 
liquor house in Louisville has es> 
caned the ravage* of whisky 
thieves Thirty barrel* of whliky 
havo been stolen by thieves who 
use long augers to bore through 
floors of warehouse* and drab 
Uriels of their contents, the 
toad being dteserered only wkja 
revises sgeais Had the essot y 
barrel* m soy es» dsissts las 
oi whisky 



Classified Qduertisemsnts. 

^ —— i s— mam— — 

For Snle-FRESH MILK COWS 
AT ALL TIMBS t 

CLAUD CONNER, 
LUDLOW R. D. % 
Near Pt. Pleasant church, Boone 
County, Ky r *ug 



20 



For Sale— Early Ohio potatoes 
•1.75 per bushel. Bseklei C. Rice, 
Burlingt on, Ky., R. D. 8 

For Bsls-Blght 75 lb.. »hoats. 
B.J . Aylor, B urlington R. D, 3, 

For Sals— Chesterwntte boor— 
one of th* best breeder* in the 
iounty. Mrs. Nors Aylor, Hebron, 
Ky. 




Ap ff'. i 



to 



on 



KBCORDBft 



Philip Taliaferro 
Undertaker 1 Embalmer 

Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 





»s«»o a td» e — ess o ssessessesssseesetsss 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1W0 



% 



Boont Co. Luthtran Pastorate 

Bev. Gbo. A. Roy br, Pa»tor. 
JANUARY 4th, 1920, 
Ebinezer Lutheran' Church, services 
10:80 a. m. Holy Communion and 
Ottering for Benevolence. 
All heartily Invited to th U service. 

BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D., Paitor. 

Preaching every Sunday- morning 

and evening. 
Bible School every Sunday at 10 a. 
'i m.— 8am Allen, Superintendent. 
9&~A cordial Invitation is extended 
to all our services. 

Next Monday is county court 
Iday 

Wln.t'P'r haa \nmt xyn Hnj« «trvo«» It 

arrived. 

Never was there a quieter Xmas 
Bay observed In Burlington. 

The census enumerator is liable 
to call upon you any time after 
today 

About an inch of snow fell here 
Saturday night and Sunday morn- 
ing. 

December' was rather a grum 
month, there not being many 
bright days. _ 

The Aurora Bulletin announces 
that beginning Jan 1, its subscrip- 
tion price will be $2 a year. 



There will be a big dance at 
Hebron tonight, Zimmer and Win 
gate committee, which insures a 
good time for all who attend. 

Notice is hereby given that my 
farm is no longer in the hands 
of any real estate agent for sale. 
B K. STEPHENS. 

Esq. J. C. Bedinger, of Walton, 
will nave a big sale of personal 
property on the 9th inst. See 
the advertisement in this paper. 



The party who has my book of 
Radford house plans will confer a 
favor by returning the same. 

J. J. KIRKPATRICK. 



The work of preparing tobacco 
plant beds is how in order. It 
will take a great many plants to 
set out the contemplated crop 
this year. 

The census which is now being 
taken is expected to show a de- 
crease ' in the rural population 
while the cities and towns will 
show an increase 

The slump that struck the to- 
bacco market just previous to the 
holidays is expected to disappear 
now and the range of high prices 
to take its place 

Ollie Rouse, residing on the 
Dixie Highway two miles south 
of Florence, will have a sale of 

£>rsonal property on the 10th 
st„ having sold- his farm 

The annual stockholders meet- 
ing of Clover Leaf Creamery will 
be held Monday, January 5, 1920, 
at 1 p. m., at the court house in 
Burlington. 

B. T. KELLY, Rec»y. 



Much to the delight of Jailor 
Fowler the cotfnty bastile is 
empty, and he would not '•kick'' 
were it to remain empty as there 
is considerable labor in dieting 
prisoners while the pay is mea- 
ger. 

R. B. Huey ha* bought of James 
Bruce the 73 acres ol land which 
Mr Bruce bought of Ira Ryle 
Ryle several weeks agb Mr. Huey 
now owns again his original pur- 
chase from the J J; Lilian! es- 
tate, he having sold the 73 acres 
to Mr Ryle about seven years ago. 



■ L. A. Tanner, who resides out 
on Rural Route 2, was in Burling- 
ton last Monday, seeking places at 
which to spend his surplus 1919 
earnings, and he selected the Re- 
corder as one of the beneficiaries 
and had January 1, 1920, placed 
opposite his name on the mailing 
list. 



In taking a retrospect of his 
past year's work County Clerk 
Rogers finds that during 1019 he 
recorded 507 transfers of real- 
estate, 215 mortgages and issued 
42 marriage licenses. February was 
the only month in which he failed 
to issue a marriage license, altho 
in July he issued only one. 



Ernest Brown, who lives hear 
y Waterloo, has been suffering con- 
siderably with a case of blood 
Eoison in his left hand. He cut 
la hand at a hog killing several 
days ago and the wound became 
, infected. Mr. .Brown is getting bet 
tpr and hopes to be completely 
recovered in a short time. 



Frank Milner, of Constance, was 
a guest of his- former schoolmate, 
Galen Kelly, the first of this week. 
Mr. Milner is one of the boys 
who saw many of the hardships 
"over there, 1 ' being severely gas- 
sed at the front. He is recovering 
from the effects of his misfor- 
tune and is attending Georgetown 
College. 

The public sale of A. D. Hunter 
near Hebron, laat Saturday after- 
noon was attended by a large 
crowd of persona a large portion 
of whom were liberal bidders with 
the slaying qualities. Auctioneer 
J. M. Eddlns was at his beat ami 
■ he disposed of animals and ar- 
ticles with a vim that brought 
tin- 1'ldtlora to the scratch in a 
hurry. He reports cows selling 
from HlOO to M*o, on* weanling 
calf. 165; horses brought as high 
*rn. Il.ro a\sahel. Mr 
Uuuttr's herd waa noted . for (l# 

mala 



> as high 
aa 1160; corn. ftl.TO a bash id. Mr 
Hunter's hard . waa noted for IU 
s&Uk quantise and than Ufa* 
aeoeral atftaand for the sain 



- Personal Mention ■ 

Mias Rachael Porter returned to 
her school at Berca last Monday. 

Mrs. Huey Aylor, of Hebron. 
It,,... t.he Recorder a brfc-i ^_.i 
one day the paat week. 

John M. Botts and wife, of Pet- 
ersburg, ate Christmas turkey with 
their daughter, Mrs. Dudley Blyth 

Miss Louise Walton, of Saylor 
Park, Ohio, is the guest of her 
grandmother, Mrs. Fannie Crop- 
per 

Master Franklin Huey spent his 
Christmas on crutches, having cut 
one of his feet badly on a piece 
of glass 

J H. Huey and family, bf North 
Berld neighborhood, spent Christ- 
mas with relatives in this part of 
the county 

A B. Renaker, wife and daugh- 
ter apenc tneir Cnmtmns noiiaay* 
with his relatives at Dry Ridge, 
Grant county 

The many friends of James E. 
Smith will be glad to hear that 
his condition has improved very 
much in the last few weeRs. 

Miss Katherln Blerman, of La- 
tonia, spent .the Christmas holi- 
days with her sister, Mrs. Frert 
Morris, out on the East Bend 
road. 

Horace Cleveland, student at 
State College, Lexington, spent 
the Christmas holidays at home 
He Is delighted with his .school 
work. \ 

Wallace Rice,, from most any- 
where in Ohio, came in last Wed- 
nesday evening and spent Xmas 
day with his parents, Edward Rice 
and wife. 

Mrs Sarah Carpenter and grand 
daughter, Miss Bessie Baldon, are 
spending a, few days with Mr and 
Mrs N. W. Carpenter, out on the 
Petersburg pike 

Mrs. F. A. Hall returned Mon- 
day evening from a Visit of sev- 
eral days with her daughters, 
Mrs. H. W. Shearer and Miss Bess 
Hall, in Newport. 

Owen Smith, who has the posi- 
tion of inspector of bearings in 
the Overland automobile sheps, at 
Toledo, Ohio, spent a portion of 
last week at home. 

Preparing to enjoy a merry 
Christmas J. B Rouse dropped in 
one day last week and cohtrib-i 
uted the necessary amount for 
another year's Recorder. 

E. L. Raisbeke, of Cincinnati, 
who has been dealing in Boone 
county real estate pretty exten- 
sively the past year, was a caller 
at this office, last Tuesday. 

Edward Slayoack and wife, of 
Gunpowder neighborhood, spent 
Tuesday with Mrs. Slayback's sis- 
ter, Mrs. B. B. Hume, who has 
been very much indisposed for 
several days. 

Earl T Cropper, traveling sales- 
man for the John II Hibbens Dr^ 
Goods Co, Cincinnati, is spending 
the holidays with his parents, H 
G Cropper and wife, of Bullitts- 
ville Mr. Cropper travels most- 
ly in Southern Kentucky 

Robert Aylor and little daugh- 
ter, of East Bend, were callers at 
this office last Wednesday after- 
noon. They were on their way 
home grom Walton, where they 
had spent several days with his 
mother, Mrs. J H'. Aylor. 

R H. Sandford, of Covington, 
who, 40 years ago, was one of 
Burlington's live wires, is . the 
guest of his brother Timothy H 
Sandford Mr. Sandford left Bur 
lington about 30 years ago and hi3 
visits to his old home town have 
been few and far between He is 
holding his own well « 

Midshipman E. R Duncan, who 
is attending the Naval Academy 
at Annapolis, Maryland, arrived 
at home last Thursday and spent 
the week's end. with his parents^ 
Dr. and Mrs E. W. Duncan Ho 
does not expect to be able to 

S et hom e again for qujjte a while. 
,e is in love with Academy airi 
the Navy. 

M. I Baker, the Limaburg dis- 
ciple, of Vulcan, was d caller at 
this office one day the past: 
week. "Bud'' has contracted the 
very commendable habit of paying 
for two Recorders every year 
and was determined that 1920 
should not break the charm. Good 
tor "Bud.'' May he never tire in 
well doing. 

Henry Klasener, of Constance, 
was a pleasant caller at this of- 
fice while transacting business in 
Burlington last Friday. He report- 
ed everything in good shape in 
his town, except the ferry, thW 
large boat there having laid up 
on account of the ice that waa 
running in the rive. Mr Klasen- 
er and wife apent Christmas day 
with their daughter, Mrs. Ben) 
Michel*, of Erlanger neighborhood, 
where a big, fat Juicy turkey was 
part of the noonday menu. 

H. L Haberly, of Bromley, was 
among the Recorder's callers last 
Friday. Mr Haberly is a carpen- 
ter and was employed in the Pull- 
man shops in Ludlow until they 
wera destroyed by fire several 
months ago, having worked for 
the Pullman Company uniif he^ is 
on their pension roll. Mr Haberly 
says the Pullman shops will be 
rebuilt in Ludlow and on a much 
grander scale than those destroy- 
ed by fire. For a time Ludlow 
thought the Pullman shops would 
be built elsewhere. 

• Havo you tested the seed corn 
you oxpect to use thi* year? 
Some say there axe gruY» doubts 
as to th* germinating qualities of 
last year's corn. By a little care 
you can avoid considerable' trou- 
ble and anxiety as to your ho»1. 
It Is worth th? while to apply 
the test. 

Have your plows put in order 
so you will be retdy to Ix'gi-i 
breaking land foe this vmir's 
•rops as soon as th » opportunity 
olfffa. Nothing like fatting a 
good start with your crop*, 



HEART TDJEART TALK 

Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D. 

Here is an old and very precious 
book I ha*~ •£.»& taken from my 
shelves. It tells of the deep things 
of our God, and these are growing 
dearer to my soul every passing day. 
I believe the rich, soul-stirring, soul- 
strengtnening truths of the Bible, 
and, I dearly love to strive to bring 
them to the attention of God's be- 
lieving people. My heart's desire 
and ray prayer to God is that my 
ministry shall be chiefly, a soul-find- 
ing ministry. 

While, for a time, absorbed in 
reading the pages of this old book 
my eyas caught these wonderful 
words: "All the attributes of God 
are engaged for the safety of believ- 
ers." 

I was startled by their amazing 
import. Think of it! "all the at- 

gers in'contemplating tbTese wonder- 
ful words. The attributes of God 
are omnipotence, omniscience, om- 
nipresence, infinite love— Infinite in 
all its characteristics.* Not one of 
these is fully understood by the 

f;reategt intellect of earth. Who can 
allium the vast import of all of 
them combined? 

Sorrowing child of God, think of 
God's glorious, unspeakable attrib- 
utes. Remember all of them are. on- 
gaged for your safety as a believer. 
Dry all of your tears. Your way 
may be rough and your trials bitter, 
painful and bard to bear. Your life 
is hid with Christ in God and all 
God's infinite attributes are pledged 
for your safety and comfort as a be- 
liever. Cast all your care on him. 
He careth for you. These exper- 
iences of the passing hour are triv- 
ial. "All things are working togeth- 
er for your good." You need ask no 
more. Lean upon God's Infinite at- 
tributes. They are engaged for your 
security. 
Union, Ky. 



The National Association of Waste 
Material Dealers estimates that 
Americans throw away $700,000,000 
worth of food each year. If only one 
ounce of food is wasted or spoiled in 
each of the 20 000,000 homes in Amer 
ica, the total loss is 1,300,000 pounds 
a day. As much coal is wasted an- 
nually as all the mines of the coun- 
try could produce in two weeks. 



Jennie Pearl Allen MeNeely. 

The death angel visited our com 
munity December 9th, 1919, and 
took from our midst one of our 
most useful young women, Jennie 
Pearl MeNeely, aged 30 years, 11 
months and two days 
.She was a daughter of Robert 
and Elizabeth Alien At the age 
of 20 she was united in marriage 
to Robert C MeNeely, March 15th, 
1909, who is left with her father, 
brother, grandfather and many 
others to mourn her death 

At the age of 11 years she ac- 
cepted Christ aa her Savior ana 
united with the Big Bone Baptist 
church, and was a faithful follow- 
er of her Savior from that time 
until God called her home 

Her life was always that of sun- 
shine She was one who could 
look on the bright side and bring 
light to those who were in dark- 
ness 

We can not understand why one 
so useful should be taken, but 
God in his wisdom knows best 
All we can say is, "Thy will be 
done*' Let us all be prepared to 
die for we know not at what hour 
he cometh 

If she had realized death was 
so near and could have left some 
parting words, I am sure they 
would have been, ''Come where I 
am going'' 

At the time of her death she 
was a member of East Bend Bap- 
tist church, where hor husband is 
pastor She was a great help to 
him in his work, and will be sad- 
ly missed by all, but "Blessed are 
the dead* who die in the Lord' 

Funeral services were conductor! 
by Rev Oscar Huey, of Louisville, 
at Big Bone Baptist church, De- 
cember 11th. 1919 

~T~ L R. M. 



Beard Favors Workhouses- 
Frankfort, Dec. 29.— The con- 
struction of large industrial build- 
ings in which the inmates of tne 
state hospitals for the insane 
and the feeble-minded can work 
will be recommended to the Leg- 
islature by the State Board of 
Control of the Penal and Char- 
itable Institutions of this state. 
The board met here today after 
each institution under their con- 
trol had been visited by one mem 
ber, and it was agreed that the 
most necessary improvement at 
these places is the construction 
of large workshops. An increas- 
ed appropriation for the main- 
tenance of the institutions Will 
also be urged. 

Bumper Corn Crop. 

— r 

Five hundred thousand railway 
cars are needed immediately to 
move the corn crop to market, a 
committee of the Chicago Board 
of Trade, ^appointed to investigate 
the situation, reported. Because 
of lack of transportation facilities 
CQuntfy elevators are overflowing, 
banks are seriously hampered be- 
cause of funds tied up in the 
crop and living costs remain high 
because of the lack of grain, 
the committee declares. 

"We have the ne-xt to the big- 

Rest corn crop i.i history and the 
nest in point of quality, but the 
supply in distribution canters is 
no small as to cause nlarui.'' said 
John J. Stream. 

Gone to Florida 

Dr M. J. Crouch and wife, of 
Union, left last Monday morning 
lug for Pmntllln, Florid t, to spend 
I bo lomilirlrr «»,' the winter He 
requested that the Recorder bo 
changed to I'mntlll'i that he may 
k"*ti Informal as to the doings 
of the people In his horns cuuift- 

ty. • , \ 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GEEATEST STORE. 




Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



Starting: Friday, January Second, our 

January 

Clearance Sale 

With the most startling Savings 
of the Entire Season 

Women's Coats Reduced. 



Values to $59.75 

$29-75 

Beautiful Winter Coats of splendid quality 
fabrics, every one of them with a big fur 
collar. Many are also fur trimmed. The 
smartest new styles and colorings in a 
wonderful variety. Savings up to ONE- 
HALF are offered on these extraordinary 
coats. 



Values to $3975 

$ 1 7.50 

9 

Just think of a brand new Winter Coat for 
only $17.50. Sounds impossible in this day 
of high prices. But right here they are, 
nearly 70 of them. Beautiful styles, fine 
heavy quality fabrics in smart self trimmed 
models. Wonderful values. 



Women's Suits 



Values up 
to $39.75 



$2 1 .75 



Fashionable tailored suits of excellent quality Serge and Tricotine, in black, navy blue, and a 
v good selection of the best colors. Many "dressy" as well as strictly tailored models are in- 
cluded in the wonderful suits at this price. 



There's hundreds of wonderful savings offered in this sale on Silks, Dress Goods, Wash 
Goods, Domestics, Hosiery, Underwear, Men's Furnishings, and Rugs and Draperies. 



Public Sale! 

Live Stock, Farm Implements, Etc. 

We will sell at public auction at our farm one 
mile from Burlington, Ky., on the Burlington 
and East Bend Road, on — "— — 

Thursday, Jan. 8, 1920 

The following property: 

2 work Horses, driving mare, work Mare, Colt coming 3 years old, Colt coming 2 years 
old, 2 Mules coming 2 years old, 6 milk Cows, 2 Heifers that will be fresh soon, 1 Heifer 
one year old, O. I. C. Registered Boar 18 months old, 9 months old Regtstered Duroc 
Boar, 14 fat Shoats that will weigh 125 pounds, 17 fat Shoats that will weigh 60 pounds. 
Sow and 7 Pi)gs, 2 Brood Sows, Farm Wagon, Road Wagon, Hay Bed, 2 sets Harness, 
Saddle, 4 Bridlds, 20 Cow Chains, Logchain, Buggy Harness, closed Carriage, Disc Har- 
Iron Churn* Deering Mower, 2 Oliver Chill Plows, Jumper Plow, crosscut Saw, 3 Scythes, 
Doubletrees, Singletrees, 2 step Ladders, 16-foot Ladder, International Separator, 2 8-gal- 
lon Milk Cans, Whitewash Sprayer, Set of Furniture, 2 Wardrobes, Cook Stove, Heating 
Stove, Coal Oil Stove, Forks, Hoes, Shovels, Hay, Fodder, Corn, 2250 Hickory tobacco 
Sticks and many other articles. 



I. 



TERMS OF &JLZS. 

All sums of $10 and under, cash ; on all sums over $10 a 
credit of nine months without interest will be given, pur- 
chasers to give notes with approved security payable at the 
Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. 

HANNA & ROBERTSON. 



J. ft, EDD1NS, Auctioneer. 

Lunch Will 



Sale to begin at 10 a. m. 
Be Served. 



wmm 



mm 



THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1<V20 



3UONE COUNTY RECORDER 



WASNT ASKING FOR MUCH 



At: r>r-.!o Wife Wanted of the Hus- 
band was Juet "One of Those 
Regional Banks." 



Stevenson, wo believe it was — our 
memory Isn't sis «ood as \* t was 1>efore 
the Income tax passed— tiled to lo- 
cate the greatest happiness in 
married Iffe, remarks a writer la r.uf- 
falo News. He said the greatest 
meed of joy comes from recount" 
Ing tales of courtship, didn't he? Or 
Is the pinnacle of happiness found in 
social contact with others, whereby 
husband nnd wife are spurred by the 
law of contrast to love one smother 
more dearly? We forget which was 
hts conclusion. 

"Tennyrate, both are wrong "and un- 
worthy of so great a master of litera- 
ture (Vu«- nuiicwi vmu ,vs *Mrf4\y F . i^ un- 
important, and very probably you 
speak within the law when you say 
so. But to us the greatest joy eomes 
in that mystic hour beside the eve- 
ning lamp, when the gray moss tnmgS 
low from the nuptial tree, casting j 
shadowy fancies about the heart of the 
home. .To sing to her, to write odes 
to lier. to recount Hi? day's work to 
her — all are |>lcusftn1 occupations. 

To read to her, though, ts the vory 
height of evening enjoyment : sbe is 
so attentive, hnngs so Interestedly 
upon every word, and then her re- 
freshing woman's views on what has 
been read! For example, last night, 
when he read two columns of compre- 
hensive uiatter on the currency inno- 
vation, after which slip yawned, wound 
up the clock and said: 

"I wish you would stop tomorrow 

and get one -Of Hm<i>» r<>;rinnnl hnnlca 

nnd bring it home. I have one of the 
A. M. & A. banks and a dime bank, 
too. But I think one of those regional 
banks would be so much more desir- 
able for larger nigney." 




CHANGE IDEAS ON HIGHWAYS 



BRITISH ADVANCE IN AFRICA 

Plan to Open Country Which the Huns 

Had Picked as Worthy of 

Exploitation. 



Railway development in Africa is 
evidently to be prosecuted with vigor. 
At any rate, , preliminaries are under 
discussion for a branch railway into 
Ruanda front the trunk line that Ger- 
man engineers had but Just completed 
from the Indian ocean to Lake Tangan- 
yika. The new li u » will advance into j 
a country where the war in Europe ' 
probably saved the natives from Ger- | 
man attack. Ruanda had r emai ne d an : 
undeveloped part of the German pos- ' 
session, btit had been examined and i 
written down as particularly worth ■ 
while to develop for the variety of its 
products. The new railway had | 
hrought Germnn military force within 
striking distance, and the history of 
German management In Africa gives 
every reason to believe that the open- 
ing up of the Ruanda country would 
have been a disaster for the Watussl 
who inhabit It. From the British 
viewpoint, these natives are to he con- 
ciliated rather than antagonized. They 
are, in fact, one of the superior races 
of Africa, held to be related to the 
Egyptians, Assyrians, or some other 
ancient African people, and should be 
benefited rnther than Injured by the 
coming of the Iron horse and the 
opening up of their country under 
British auspices. — Christian Science 
Monitor. 



Non-Motoring Public No Longer Re- 
gards Good Roads as Speedways 
for Fortunate Neighbors. 

The public's conception of "good 
roads" has undergone a radical change 
in the last two years. 

Prior to the entry of the United 
Siaies into the world war, t'.ie bob- 
motoring American public, more often 
than not, thought good roads were ud- 
vocated chiefly for the benefit of their 
more fortunate neighbors who owned 
and drove their own motor cars. 
writc* E. A. Williams. Jr., president 
of a large motor truck company. They 
were inclined to regard good roads 
laws as Class legislation and were urp 
willing ft iv the most part to lend either 
financial or moral support to ihe con- 
struction and upkeep of something 
from which they derived no direct 
benefits so far as they could see. 

The war merely hastened whn' 
leaders of the industry hhd foreseen 
for several years; |* furnished the set- 
ting and the conditions which enabled 
the truck to establish itself as a fac- 
tor In the economic life of the coun- 
try. 

The non-motoring public no longer 
looks upon good roads as "speedways" 
for the motoring "aristocracy." It has 
come to realize that motor trucks 
are essential ns transportation factors, 
and that good roads are necessary to 
the efficient operation of trucks. Its 
vision has been broadened ; It sees the 
advantages and benefits which accrue 
from a combination of these factors — 
benefits which have a direct bearing 
upon the economic conditions of the 
community. 

It sees the farm brought, one might 
say, to the very table of the consumer; 
it sees an ultimate decrease in food 
prices; and, those who pause to con- 
sider the matter further, see the ever 
e xpanding range of possibllilies of the 
truck and its ally, good roads. 

With the universal recognition nnd 
adoption of the motor truck the pub- 
lic's conception of how roads should 
be built also has undergone a change. 
Heretofore there has been a vast dif- 
ference between the average man's 
Idea of good roads and that of the 
experienced engineer. The average 
man was content to build for the pres- 
ent ; the engineer, as a result of past 
and not altogether satisfactory exper- 



Appreciated American Spirit. 
Here is au anecdote from Maj. Ian 
Hay Beith's "The Last Million," that 
shows the feeling of one British offl- j 
cer toward the American doughboy. 
"I like the young American's passion- 
ate affection for his country," said the 
officer, "nnd his fixed determination 
;to boost everything connected with her. 
■One day I was waiting in a village for 
an American staff car which was be- 
dng sent for me from Chaumont. I 
found one standing at the corner of 
the street, so I asked the chauffeur, 
, thinking he might be from headquar- 
ters, 'Where are you from?' And he 
sat tip and replied all In one breath, 
as If I had pressed a button, "Sir, I 
am from Marlon, Ohio, the greatest 
steam-shovel producing center in the 
world!' Just like that. That is what 
I call the right spirit." 




POSTS- O. 

Notice is hereby given that the 
lands belonging to the undesign- 
ed or under their control is pojt- 
cd against any and all kinds of 
fishing, hunting, trapping— in fact 
ngainst trespass of any and ail 
kinds, and "persons diaregar !i a , 
this notice will be prosecuted: 
BELLE VIEW PRECINCT. 

JULIA S. DINSMORE 

W. T. RYLE. 

MRS. E. L GRANT. 
BURLINGTON PRECINCT. 

FRANK PHILIPS. 

CLYDE BERKSHIRE. 

IRA T. RYLE 

BERT BERKSHIRE. 

R. B. HUEY. 

OPCAR HAN'NA. 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK. 
(known as Sullivan farm.) 

CARLTON PRECINCT. 
L. C. CRAIG. 

B. O". RYLE. 

WILLIAM PHILLIPS. 

S. J. STEPHENS. 

LEWIS L. & Wm. J. bVBPHENS 

BULLITTSVILLE PRECINCT' 

THOMAS P. GRANT. 

OTTO E. SOUTHER. 

H. D. SOUTHER. 

RILEY & DAY. 

MARY V. GAINES. 

B. C. GRADDY. 
CONSTANCE PRECINCT 

GEO. LOZE. 

ALONZO GAINES. 

MISS BELLE BAKER. 
PETERSBURG PRECINCT. 

B. H. BERKSHIRE. 

P. E. BRUCE. 

R. W. TERRILL. 

B. L. Rich, Jr. 

STEVENS BROS. 
FLORENCE PRECINCT. 

BEN LONG. 

J B. RESPAS3. 

CLEM KENDALL. 

BUTLER CARPENTER. 

J. C. LAYNE, Jr. 
VERONA PRECINCT. 

MRS. D. O. HUDSON. • 

JOHN FITZHARRIS. 
BEAVER PRECINCT 

DICK BAKER. 
UNION PRECINCT. 

IRA AYLOR. 

Arminta Aylor. 



Motor Truck Carrying Big Load Over 
lmprov-.j Road. 



t- 



New Kind of Construction. 
Several exhibition halls and assem- 
bly rooms have been "built in Norway 
by attaching to the uprights a "net- 
ting," fashioned from wooden rods 
about a third of an inch square in 
cross-section, which are bound to- 
gether with tin-plated Iron wire, nnd 
subsequently covered with a durable 
plaster. Structures of this sort, soys 
Popular Mechanics Maguzine, are 
easily and quickly constructed and are 
said to be useful in winter time. 



Qualified. 

He was applying for a position as 
attendant In an insane asylum. 

"Have you bad any experience han- 
dling Irrational persons?" he was 
•aked. 

"Some," was his reasons* "I was a 
motion-picture director for sevural 
years." 

And he won hired forth WUfh.- Kllui 
Fun. 



Proof. 

"My dear, I mum one of tin- very 
first to leave," mi 1. 1 a mini, who, on re- 
fcrmlng from mi evvniiix party, waa 
Jreeted reproachfully by hi* wife. 

"Ob. yea elwajre say thai," ehe r* 



"Weil t c«a i*re»a It ibis iimm, any* 
haw." insisted tee beabauU. "Look la 
tb* hall aud *«■«• ti lt .mH i wumitsd 
fteetat I've Btwagtit 



ience, knows nnd has known tho Im- 
portance of building for the future 
as well as the present. 

The first thing a railroad does after 
obtaining a right-of-way, as everyone 
knows, is to build a roadbed aud lay 
tracks. That roadbed is put in to 
stay. The track, which corresponds 
to the surface of *he highway, is built 
of the most substantial and practical 
material to be had. 

The railroad officials, however, do 
not expect this roadbed and track to 
last forever without attention. Long 
ago they learned that the only way 
to assure safety and durability is to 
anticipate depreciation and make con- 
stant repairs. 

That is just what we are coming to 
in road building. For years it has been 
customary tfor Oounty engineers to 
direct such operations but for the 
most part their work has been ham- 
pered by lack of funds, and inade- 
quate force or by limited legislation 
and more or less red tape. There are 
some states In which farmers are still 
working out their road tax by the day, 
hauling gravel or stone In a more or 
less haphazard fashion for the con- 
struction of roads; upon their efforts 
and those of a limited force of hired 
.workers depends the maintenance of 
the community's highways. 



Great Loss In Ken- 
tucky's Wheat Crop. 

Wheat growers in Kentucky lost 
$3,000,000 on 1919 crops, according 
to Geoffrey Morgan, asustmt di- 
rector of farm extension work, 
University of Kentucky, in an ad- 
dress to seventy-five Jefferson 
county farmers at the Board of 
Trade, Louisville. The farmers' 
meeting, was held for tho purpose 
of organizing a Jefferson County 
Farm Bureau. 

Mr. Morgan said a million acres 
was cultivated In wheat last year, 
and that the crop averaged but 
eleven bushels to the acre. Pro- 
duction cost was $25 an acre, and 
wheat was sold by farmers at $2 
a bushel. 

Mr. Morgan said he took the 
cost of production an acre of 
wheat from figures submitted at 
an investigation of a Cincinnati 
High Cost of Living Commission, 
which waa investigating alleged 
profiteering by farmers .but which 
dropped the investigation. 

"I let the other fellow do the 
figuring/ Mr. Morgan said, "but 
the farmer'B figures were placed 
Btill higher.*' 

Mr. Morgan did not stop at 
the figures, however. 

He said the miller bought four 
bushels of wheat for each barrel 
of flour; that the miller • received 
!J12.t5, exclusive of by-products, 
for each barrel ; that the baker 
received $58 for products of a 
barrel of flour, and that the gro- 
cer, restaurateur and confection- 
er realized $587 when it had been 
converted into bread, biscuits, 
cakes and p:tstry. The figure cov- 
ering all ingredients, however. 

Lack Solemnity. 

A report conies from Louisville 
to the effect that steps are tor 
be taken to have the next ses- 
sion of the Kentucky Legislature 
pass a law making it necessary 
to publish the applications for 
marriage licenses several days be- 
fore the license can be issued 

These students of sociology say 
it ia too easy for persons of ten- 
der age to obtain a license in 
Kentucky and aver something 
must be done to remedy the 
condition 

There ia a movement afoot' to 
take the right of marryipg cou- 
ples away from magistrates It is 
these persons who are responsible 
for many young couples being 
married, it is said 

Under the Kentucky law, a mag- 
istrate, no matter what his qual- 
ifications might be, can perform 
a marriage ceremony , , 

The ministers of Kentucky say 
records will ahow that more than 
60 per cent of all divorce suits 
filed are by persons married by 
magistrates 

Magisterial ceremonies, it is 
claimed, lack the solemnity and 
are not as impressive as ones 
performed by an ordained minis- 
ter 







^j^fc**^*^ 




%m. 



■*•-•*» «.'x 



A vail amount of work now rrmaina to be don* whi*h Ihe 
intrrrr ntion of war baa mcrnartty delayed and accumu- 
lated, and the result ia that • • • • • very large capital 
expenditure* ought to be made to make up for the inter- 
ruption* tncvitali'y ■' k to the war. and to prepare the rail- 
madi to serve adequately the increaaed traffic throughout 
the country. WALKER D. HINES. 

Utrufr G..»r«/,/ «iu>M4i. 



Work more — 
Produce more — 
Save more — 

But we can't continue increasing our 
production unless we continue increasing 
our railroad facilities. 

The farms, mines and factories cannot 
increase their output beyond the capacity 
of the railroads to haul their products. 

Railroads are now near the peak of their 
carrying capacity. 

Without railroad expansion — more en- 
gines, more cars, more tracks, more ter- 
minals — there can be little increase in 
production. 

But this country of ours is going to 
keep right on growing — and the railroads 
must grow with it. 

To command in the investment markets 
the flow of new capital to expand railroad 
facilities — and so increase production — 
there must be public confidence in the 
future earning power of railroads. 

The nation's business can grow only as 
fast as the railroads grow. 

3hlt> > adjKrtimYimt & 

SidMxmtipa ofdlailway %cecutwe&. 



Those desiring information contenting the railroad situ- 
ation may obtain literature by writing to the Associa- 
tion of Railway Executives. 61 Broadway, New York. 



Satisfactory Glasses 

Our glasses are comfortable when 
fitted, and wc keep them so for you 
free of charge. Any time they get 
bent or out of shape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 

Phone South 1746 

DR. N. F. PENN,6i 3 MadisorAvT^CovSlg'ton. Ky 





C&-eS=^^ 



FIND WORK FOR EX-SOLDIERS 

Eleven States Plan Vital Highway Im- 
provements This Summer- 
Fighters Preferred. 

Thousands «>f eotdieni corAlng bark 
In civil life Mitli ii preference for 
iititiltHic work will ftntl employment In 
ImiiIiIih^ IiIkIiv* ji vh In their bOOM 
state* lUftarti from sieto highway 

UliruU vl iU'HU tftatva mu, lual 
hi mi n will he flli|iU>)itl mi tllttlr 
n»ttiU ihl« yeaf mid thai caliber* wlM 
be flten Ilia u i Terence. 



Nelson County.— Tobacco on this 
market has been ranging from 16 
cents to over $1.00 per pound. 
The bulk of tho crop is yet to 
be sold on most farms. Early crops 
are grading out nicely but late 



LUTE BRADFORD 

•^AUCTIONEER- 

Is well posted on prices, has a wide acquaintance and 
knows all the good buyers. 

Live Stock Sales a Specialty 

Can Give all the Reference You Want. 
Farmers Phone. TERMS REASONABLE. 

L FLORENCE, KY., R. D. 



F. W. Kassebaom 6 Sen, 

:«R1S!TE 4 IlARBtB 

iwdNUMENTS, 

'i 
H Large Stock on Display j 

to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA. IND. 




! Sales and Service 



ia «— jcrciim -au, 

COVINGTON, . KY. 

CLYDE BARLOW, 

General Manager. 



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^ D. E. Oastleman, 
ATTORNE Y AT LAW, 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlan$er, - Kentucky. 

WANTED 

Boone County farms to sell. Ad- 
dress W. E. VE8T, 
First Nat. Hank Building, 

Covington, Ky 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Building 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



While Oak Stock Farm 



■' 







now has on hand April farrowed pigs 
both sexes; will be ready for ship- 
ment when 8 to 10 weeks old. These 
are the Big Bone aud smooth type, 
the kind that makes the show hog. 
Prices Reasonable — Pedigrees Free. 

FRANK HAMMOND, 
R. D. 1, Florence, Ky. 

Con. Phone 220. ma 8tf 



r^@ 




<i ._.. > . ; .e +v .K.++*.:.*+.:-+-H-+++++4..:. *» +» »+ » +**»- M '»++*++++»-m-»* 
ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 
Subscribe for the Recorder. 



crops are darker, but will weigh 
*d par acre is light, 
somewhat ovar half a prop. Judg 



ing from thi* present indication* 
thru' will lx» ii vory largt) crop. 
The fri- |iii'iit rains caused mueh 
t<il>iuci> to be stripped from thp 
Home small crops wrrt* net 
bulked at all Many have l>ulk»<t 
down now ami will work <m the 
tobacco Hirlpplng k>b all thr<4lgh 
the) holiday* in order to Ik* ready 

tl ii • t**rly January market, 
grade* h«\e bean "" inprt. * 
• i the last few sale*, hut there 
haa been no drop In t <*of 

hil B hUi made*. 



NOTICE. 

All those indebted to the Burling- 
ton end Waterloo Tttlphnne Co. OB 
account of box rent or »wl«oh (luce 
muat pa>w tha aemn to W. H. Mar- 
Kball, tV<r«tarv. p«f<ire January 10, 
ItnaJ. HUBKKT WHITK, 

ojanMtu Ptealdant. 

FOR SALE 

Pure brad B»rn*tl Plymouth Rock 
tnrela from lay luff, sUalna fl (X) 
«Mh. MKH It « OHAIH'N 

tens HurUimthn H l» 1 

OeaeeHafled euee Hi 



• Loet Certificate. 

I have loet my Burley Tobacco 
Warehouse Certificate No. 478. Infor 
iiiatlon as to Its whereabouts will be 
thankfully received. 

K. K OH A NT, 
BorllPftou, Ky., 11. D. 1. 

Wanted To Buy Farms. 

Any else or location Ceah buyers 
all klude rlimd inn (let, alee 
ami pri 

Wm. K HA1UI>. 
10 net Krtanff-r, K> 



Do not allow the 
poisons of undigested 
food to accumulate in 
your bowels, where they 
are absorbed into your 
system. Indigestion, con- 
stipation, headache, bad 
blood, and numerous 
other troubles are bound 
to follow. Keep your 
system ciean, as thous- 
ands of others do, by 
taking an occasional dose 
of the old, reliable, veg- 
etable, family liver medi- 
cine. 

Thedford'9 • 



Black-Draught 



Mrs. W. F. Pickle, of 
Rising Fawn, Ga., writes: 
"We have used Thed- 
ford's. Black-Draught as 
a family medicine. My 
mother-in-law could not 
take calomel as it seemed 
too strong for her, so she 
used Black -Draught as a 
mild laxative ana liver 
regulator . . . We use it 
in ihe family and believe 
it is the best medicine fot 
the liver made." Try it. 
Insist on the genuine— 
Thedford's. 25c a pack- 
age. E-75 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by (^Adver- 
tising. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eeeeeeeeeeeee 

• a 
e IMPORTANT NOTICB. e 
a Watch the date following a 
e your name on the margin a 
a of your paper and if It ia a 
a not correct please notify a 
e this office at onoe. It your a 

• paper has been dlaconttnu- a 

# ed by mistake before your a 
a time expired do not delay a 

• notifying thla office. All er- a 

# rora are cheerfelly correct- a 
S ed her* a 

♦ ♦ 

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> 



lubs a i lbe (oe 



•HUSH, 










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I 



THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1920 



GOOD 
ROADS 

1 '■ ■ " i ■— ■ — .i 

DAMAGE DONE TO HIGHWAYS 



Public Road* Bureau Experimenting 
With Matter of Impact en 

Various Surface*. 

A new series of experiments, which 
may have a fur-reaching effect upon 
transportation on the highways and 
the regulation thereof, has been un- 
dertaken by the bureau of public 
roads, department of agriculture. 

Tne work, whfch. is being douc uj 
the division of road materials, test 
und research, is designed to demon- 
strate the damage done to highways 
by different forms of transportation 
units traveling under varying condi- 
tions. It is thought that the Infor- 
mation so obtained will perhaps serw 
as a basis for scientific regulation of 
traffic on different types of pavements. 
Incidentally indicating the types and 
designs of road wTilch will best serve 
the needs of truffle. 

It Is also suggested* that from this 
knowledge fair consideration will be 
nsxurud In legislative charges against 





KEEP ONLY PROFITABLE HENS 

Emergency Agents Waging Successful 

Campaign Against Unprofitable 

Fowls in Flocks. 

;r.. y avo& vj» »:»• v-v.ti BtsJss tzgs** 

ment of Agriculture.) 
Practically all the southern MJssls- 
alppl valley and middle Western states 
have effected satisfactory Increases In 
their production of poultry products. 
The emergency agents are now waging 
a successful campaign against the un- 
profitable hens by getting owners to 
cull such fowls from their flocks. Heas 
which produce less than 7. r » eggs a year 
are better dead than alive, while fowls 
which yield from 75 to 100 eggs annual- 
ly are only fair producers. Good lay- 
ers produce 125 eggs and upward every 
12 months. In some flocks of 200 hens, 
76 of the low-producing fowls have 




WHEN YOU BUY SEED 

Do you buy those for which your land is 
best adapted? Or do you buy certain kinds as 
a~ force of habit or because they are cheaper? 

WHAT QUALITY DO YOU BUY? 
The best are the cheapest- 
High grade seeds mean high grade crops, 

and high grade crops mepns more money in 

your pocket. 

We handle only the highest grades of 
seeds — expertly tested. 

HILL SELLS DIRECT TO YOU AT 
WHOLESALE PRICES. 

We handle garden and flower seed — all 
varieties — in. the bulk. High test, pure seeds, 
large or small quantities. The best you can 
buy at the best prices. 

Write us for prices or information, or pay 
us a visit. * 

All letters of inquiry will be appreciated 
and promptly answered. 

Weights and measures guaranteed. 

PROFIT BY OUR 57 YEARS EXPERIENCE. 

Geo. W. Hill & Co. 

COVINGTON, KY. 
GROCERS & SEEDSMEN WHOLESALE & RETAIL 



CHRISTMAS GIFT than a 



Post Road in Maine Built Under Gov- 
ernment Supervision. 

truffle, since an accurate measure of 
impact damage therefrom will be pos- 
sible. 

The experiments will cover a wide 
range, taking into account four fac- 
tors—those of speed, height of fall, 
type of tire used and the weight of 
the transportation unit 

Under the last heading It will he 
necessary for the bureau to consider 
distribution of weight above and un- 
der springs and on back and front 
axles, a quantity which Is decidedly 
variable on different makes of motor 
and horse-drawn vehicles. The bureau 
has called upon the national automo- 
bile cbatdber of commerce to assist 
in the collection of this data, much 
of which has not .been generally tabu- 
lated, ind o questionnaire hns^ been 
sent to all motor truck manufacturers 
of America on this subject. Immedi- 
ate attention to this has beet) request- 
ed in order to facilitate 'the experi- 
ments. 

Tn the Initial stages of the work the 
pack has been measured by the per- 
manent deformation of one-half hy 
one-half inch copper cylinders placed 
- under a steel plunger subjected to the 
impact of trafllc, A varying height of 
f-.ill Is arrived at by different take-offs 
for the machine. First experiments 
Indicated n wide range in the force 
of impact us between units with solid 

tires und pneumatics^ ■' 

Working from these first steps the 
bureau officials plan to perfect a ma- 
chine which will take Into account the 
factors mentioned and which will en- 
able them to provide a constant suc- 
cession of impacts on selected 'slabs 
or paving compositions. This will en- 
able the experiments to proceed much 
more rapidly than would be possible 
under actual road conditions. Tests- 
will be. made on horse-drawh as well 
as motor-driven vehicles. \^ 

In addition to the above experi- 
ments another series is planned to de- 
termine the wearing qualities of differ- 
ent types of road surfnees when sub- 
jected to very heavy trafllc. 



Most Profitable Flock of White Leg- 
horns. 

beeu eliminated and still the normal 
production has l>een maintained. This 
results from more favorable condi- 
tions and surroundings for the hens 
left In the flock which are not so 
crowded and which consequently pro- 
duce better. 



POULTRY AND EGGS SUPPLY 

Badly Needed to Help Feed the World 

— Nothing Else Costs 80 Little to 

Raise on Farm. 

(By P. O. HOLDEN.) 
The high price of feed and' the high 
price of poultry have combined In 
causing farmers to greatly- reduce 
their flocks, and as a result we are 
facing a serious shortage in poultry 
and eggs at a time when they are bad- 
ly needed to help feed the world. 

We must not forget thnt while feed 
is high ami while poultry brings good 
prices, nothing else costs so little to 
raise on a farm as chickens, and that 
eggs are bringing fuel) high prices we 
cannot afford to shut off the source of 
their supply. — ■ — 

Large flocks of poultry are needed 
on every farm, and every farmer 
should keep his you&g pullets, which 
will soon be his be.*t layers. Get rid 
of the roosters. Avoid wasteful meth- 
ods in handliug poultry auQ lu mar- 
keting eggs. 





Ihe KITCAm 
G\BIAE xr ~ 




He Is a poet strong and true 
Who loves wild thyme and honey-dew;: 
And like a brown bee Works and sings. 
With morning freshness on his winga. 
And a gold burden on his thighs— 
The pollen dust of centuries! 

—Maurice Thompson. 



Ask for 

HILL'S 





SAVE TRANSPORTATION COSTS 



Eight Cents Per Ton-Mile Cm Be Ef- 
fected When Road Is Lifted to 

Durable Class. 

The report of the joint congressional 
committee which Investigated highway 
economics tn 1814 shows that a saving 
of eight cents per ton-mile can be ef- 
fected in transportation Costs when a 
mud Is lifted from the dirt to the du- 
rable class. This does not take into 
acrount Increased real estate valua- 
tions or social advantages from the Im- 
provement. 



Good Roads Approved. 
The secretary of agriculture, up to 
May 1, had approved 1,057 project 
•tutemonls for federal aid roads. In- 
volving the Improvement of lO.IYSO 
mi Lot of highway* at uu estimated 
coat of $02,038,000. 



Mueh for Trunk Highways. 

ft Is proponed that Uurlu gam a t >cud 

»«W,OOu.u0u fur trunk highway. »uw 

east the as B se s spprsa eh e a ween a 

will have as further rat too tt 

prluctpallj wtlft a mWdSga 



BLACKHEAD IS BAD DISEASE 

Cases Are Infrequent Where Birds 

Are Permitted to Forage for 

Moot of Their Feed. 

Of the infectious diseases of tur- 
keys, according to Andrew S. Welnut, 
of the bureau of animal industry, de- 
partment of agriculture, blackhead is 
the most destructive. It is notable 
that whenever the climate and range 
conditions are such as to permit of 
the turkeys foraging for most of their 
feed from the time they are hatched 
until they are marketed, cases of 
blackhead are Infrequent. Blackhead 
occasionally affects grown turkeys, but 
It mostly occurs among young turkeys 
between the uges of six weeks und 
four mouths. No positive cure for 
blackhead hns been found. As in the 
case of all other infectious diseases, 
the sick bird should Immediately be 
removed from the flock to prevent a 
further spread of the disease, and If 
very sick. It is best to kill it and burn 
the body. 

HINTS ON SELECTING LAYERS 

Pullets With Alert Eyes and Comb, 

Fsce and Wattles of Fine 

Texture Are Best. 

Judging poultry Is saitV to he a finer 
art titan the selection of oilier farm 
animals, but the man or WOUUtO who 
picks pullets with a line bead, alert 
eyes and comb, fft«S ami wutlles of 
One texture, hat taken the first stop 
toward liureastd egg production, QtfOd 
pullets should alund square on their 
with legs wide ujui.l, with Ihe 
frout tad of the body «llglill> higher 
than the |M»aU'rtoi eitd. unit With a long 
b«Ck uihI lull nulled miliar high I lt« 
body should be wedgt»saap«. l lsh l l ll 
autpu kmn f«« the vefM'wdueikia sad 
digestive **f»e* 



DISHES FOR HOT DAYS. 

The delicatessen stores are of great 
help to the business woman who has 
no tftne for cook- 
ing and can afford 
to pay the extra' 
price demanded tor 
ready-to-cat food. 
For the housewife. 
however, such food 
is not economical 
to buy except oil 
occasions when a quick meal may I ■ 
prepared after an afternoon's outing. 
The cost of the dishes when prepared 
at home will be found to be much 
less, as odds und eti'is will make these 
appetizing croquettes, deviled end's. 
and potato snlads. Further she b:'s 
the assurance thai the food Is fresh 
and wholesome. All the 'advantages of 
Th e" (telle:! lessen* food is uffwt I 
possibility nf a case of ptomaine poi 
soiling, as in many stores perishable 
foods are not Iced and will spoil in 
a short time. 

Ham Loaf.— This may he prepared 
from the bits of a leftover nulled bam 
or from a slice of broiled nam. Take 
three cupfuls of finely minced bam. 
one small onion also minced, three 
sprigs of parsley, one tnblespoonful of 
prepared mustard and two eggs. Put 
the bam, onion and parsle y through 
the meat grinder, add the eggs and 
■mustard, beating the eggs and mixing 
all the Ingredients until well blend- 
ed, adding salt and pepper to taste. 
Pack Into a well greased bread pan 
and bake In a moderate oven for for- 
ty-live minutes. Serve hot or cold. 
(Jarnish with chopped egg while and 
serve In green pepper cups with to- 
mato jelly. 

Chicken or Ham Croquettes.— Melt 
four tablespoonfuls of butler or any 
sweet fat, ailil five" tablespoonfuls of 
flour and when well blended add three* 
quarters of a cup of milk gradually 
auil cook until Ihlck ; then add one 
cupful of chicken or bam finely 
iuIikhmI and one egg yolk and season- 
ing of salt anil pepper, one roaspooniul 
at lemon .lulce with a little celery 
salt. Form Into croquettes when cool. 
Best Ihe egg white, add n quarter of n 

epp nf water, roil in crumbs and egg 

und let Stand to become Arm. Hcown in 
hot fat. Uebeat In 11 pun well covered 
In n h"t oven' twelve minutes. 



Fleming County Farratra were 

V*»ry hue) alnpplug tolwipeo after 
the w,.t ueathoi which fuinlabiui 
u gr«*«t »«meon allh" very oold 
has been «**nt into ths 
. at a KicNt rate and has 
brought k The atop la 

tut ning 

Ihoiii 



FIVE MILLION P 
USED XT LAST YEAR 

HILLS 

CASCARAb>QUININE 

Standard cold MSSldS for 10 year* 

—in tablet form-7«afe, aurt, no 

opiate* — breaks up a cold in 24 

hour* — relieve* grip in 3 days. 

Money back if it fail*. The 

genuine boa has a Red 

top with Mr HUl'a 

picture 

At All Drag Stmrma 




NOTICE. 

rfave lost my certificate of stock 
in the Burlev Tobacco Company. 
JOHN W. FISHER. 



NOTICE. 

I have failed to receive Certificate 
No. 1456 in the Rurley Tobacco Co. 
representing $23.65 worth of stock 
and am making application to said 
Company for a duplicate stock cer- 
tificate. W. N. I'TZ, 
R. D. 2 Ludlow, Ky. 



Lost Certificate. 

The Warehouse Certificate issued 
to 4. I. McWethy in the\Burley To- 
bacco Company for stock has been 
lost and the number of said certifi- 
cate is unknown to me. Any infor- 
mation as to the whereabouts of said 
certificate will be gladly received by 
the undersigned. 

Mrs. J. I. McWethy, 

Petersburg, Ky. 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All Calls Promptly Attended. 

Twenty-one years Practice. 
Phone 733 , WALTON, KY. 



DfL. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

«k>VOBNTI6T^d^ 
Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 






W - A- N -T- E - D 

Beech, Sycamore, Maple, 
Oak and Walnut Logs. 

If you Irave any to soil write to 

C C. MENGEL A BRO. CO. 
I ouUvlll* Kentucky 



•tier than si 



ft) at 



ight 




W 1 IOOMIN 



e l ItAiiM *l lloait. I 



Suit or Overcoat 

WACHS has them for 

Men, Young Men 
and Boys 

Also a large stock of Sweater Coats, Corduroy 
and Duck Coats ; also Pants. Let us show them 
to you 



Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 



Dodge Brothers 



^ 



MOTOR CAR ^ 




DODGE TOURING CAR 

Following is the present prices of the 
Automobiles for which I am agent: 

Dodge Touring Car $1172.50 

Dodge Roadster $1172.50 

Dodge Sedan $1867.00 

Essex $1687.00 

Sport Model Hudson - $2310.00 

Seven Passenger Hudson $21 10.00 

The above prices are for cars delivered at your home. : I 
keep on hand tires and accessories of all kinds at right prices. 

Cleveland Tractor, $1585. 

B. B. HUME, Agent - 

Sales Room, No. 5 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 



!23S 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 



1 



Embalmer and Funeral Director 



—p^o^sfc* 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 
Consolidated Phone 39. Farmers Phone. 



The B. B, Hume Automobile Co., Inc. 

23-25-27 E. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 

J. H. CHOATS. , I. L. HOOD. 

Agents for the following Autoniohiles aud Trucks - . 

Hupmobile Model "R" 191 

$1,335 f. o. b. Detroit. 



We have discontinued the sale of the Republic Truck and 
• taken the Agency for the OENBY TRUCK. 

One Ton Denby $1,680 00 f. o. b. Detroit. 

Two Ton Denby $2, .150 00 •• *• * 

three and 1-2 Ton Denby 14. 150 00 

Five Ton Denby $4.900 00 •• ** 

\\'«« arc prepared to tuk» care of nil repairs by expert mnolianU 
Wn carry a full line of accessories, batf*rlea ami pt*rtn. 

Park Your Car with Us When In Covington- 25c per day; 
50c Day and Night 



Take Tour County Paper, $1 



♦ ♦4>« + t 



►♦♦♦♦*♦ **♦♦♦♦♦< ♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦ 



^*m 



^"^H^^^^^H 



THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1920 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



WOANE CO. RECORDER 

•JMjHLfSIIKli KVHIiV THURSDAY 

W. L. KIDDELL, Publisher. 



led jit I h<- Pc.Mifflcr in Burling 
,i. Kv„ as SPOOnd-ClasH Mail 



WHAT EVERYONE 

SHOULD KNOW 

The Fourteenth Decennial 

Census of the United 

States Is On. 



In The Presence of Evil 

Good Is Discerned. 

Human greed is odd of tho dis- 
couraging phases of human life. 
Always present, but not always 
evident, it makes its most direful 
manifestation in periods of emer- 
gency in the matter of existence 
and ghoulishly preys upon its 
victims at a time when all that 
is best in human nature chal- 
lenges to helpfulness because of 
an unusual state of helplessness. 
In the end there is revolt among 
the oppressed, and by revolution 
of righteousness society wins a re 
currence of that regard for law, 
enforced through penalty, which 
it has never been able to com- 
pel through compassionate re- 
gard bt\ the part of might for 



Under the immediate direction 
of W. C, Elliston, Supervisor of I 
the Sixth census district of Ken- : right, 
tucky census enumerators will call Throughout the period of the 
at every dwelling house- in tin* j war response to the world's cry 
.•v><...Ti.;«i',r to secffio- the- infor-im"" rt^-i.f rn §t» tim** or great 

distress was generous and 



mat ion necessary to fill out the 
question* contained on tho print- 
ed census schedules. 

Questions covering the follow- 
ing points will be asked of every 
person in the United State*: 

Sex : 

Color or race ; 

-Ace at last birthday; 



ige 
Vhei 



generous and aeem- 
i ingly alt-comprehending. All sorts 
' and conditions of people, every 
! class and branch of the social 
order, gave surface indications of 
i a sincere, cordial spirit of help- 
fulness, even to the extremity of 
[ sacrifice. it seemed that the 
. world, through suffering and sym 



Whether single, married, wii- ', pathy therefor, was growing 
owed or divorced; i better just when it was at its 

Birthplace of person onumerat- worst. We rejoiced in the midst 
ed and birthplaces of father ana | of anxiety and self-denial that 
mother, giving names of both-j good was overcoming evil and 
country and province if foreign i that through its baptism of 
born; | blood humanity was attaining the 

Occupation, specifying trade or ' soul's beautifying, 
profession, also industry in which; Then came deliverance, readjust- 



employed ; 

Whether attending school ; 

Whether able to read ; 

Whether able to write; 

Whether able to speak English; 

Whether home is owned of rent- 
r ed, and if owned whether home 
is free of encumbrance or ismort-r. 
gaged ; 

Persons of foreign birth will be 
asked questions concerning these 
additional points : 

Year of immigration to the tf. 

Whether neutralized, and if so 
the year of naturalization; 

Mother tongue or native lan- 
guage. 

EVERY FARM VISITED. 

Census enumerators also will call 
at every farm in this community 
to secure the information neces- 
sary to fill out the questions 
contained oa the agriculture ached 
ule. 

Each farmer will foe asked 
questions concerning the acreage 
and value of his farm; whether 
he owns, rents or partly owns ana 
partly rents the land he farms: 
the value of the buildings, ma- 



ment and revelation. The develop 
rnents are at times dishearten- 
ing. We have endured the transi- 
tion period of profiteering with 
all its embroidery of evil mo- 
tives and evil means, wrought in 
unnumbered wrongs by evil men, 
or the suddenly awakened evil in 
men. We have endured it until 
it has become commonplace. And 
now, day after day, we are hear- 
ing of uncovered scandals in near 
ly all depart meats of war work, 
governmental contracts State de- 
partmental agencies in war-time 
aid, until the wonder is, and still 
the wonder grows, that there can 
be such tendency to prey on hu- 
man woes, and further yet the 
wonder as to where all honor 
goes. 

<: What is man that thou are 
mindful of him?'' was an apos- 
trophe of the Psalmist to the 
Eternal. In such circumstances as 
these we can easily adopt it, in 
sheer despondency. But we don't. 
We simply fall back on that faith, 
always safe and ever saving, that 
relatively exploiters of human 
evil are few and exploiters of 
chinery and implements belonging human good are many, very many 
to his farm ; the quantify of afi more, and salvation is in the rule 
crops raised on his farm daring of the majority —Commercial Tri- 
the year 1919; and many other; bune. 

questions which cover all possible ! y ■ 

farm operations. tup UfOOD SUPPLY 

An absolutely accurate and com- : ,nt ffUUU *UrrLI. 

plete census vitally concerns the' _ ~T"~ 

Welfare of this community and of , °" t° many farms there are 
every person living in it. The of- , de * d trees, old rails and posts 
Hcial population Tor the next ten ! a » d ° f *? n an old unproductive or- 
years will be determined bv thej? hard * hat may be worked up 



4 

4 
4 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 




TO ALL 



| Good Lirc^and Good Health 

g I want to thank my many custo- 
^ mers and friends for their help in 
JJ building my business to the s'atis- 
3 faction which I have met during the 
* year 1919, hoping that 1920 will 
meet you all with Prosperity and 
Success in every way. 

W. L. KIRKPATRICK; 

Burlington, Ky. I 




A 



v 



census of 1920, 

BE READY WITH YOUR AN- 
SWERS * WHEN THE CENSU.S 
MAN CALLS AT YOUR'HOFSE. 



SPECIAL TERM. 



into stove wood to good ad 
vantage. There is no better place 
for rails that are worthless for 
fence than the wood pile and 
the same can be said of a worth- 
less orchard. Apple tree wood 
does not burn well the first year 
after cutting, so if you have an 
old orchard to grub out this 
winter do not plan to burn it 
for fuel until the next fall. Some 



Judge Gaines began a special 
term of the Boon? Circuit Court 

last Tuesday for the purpose of j farmers" are"carefess" about" work- 
trying of the suit to settle thei'ing up the small limbs and the 
estate of Benj. Cook, deceased. At l branches into wood. The time is 
the time of his death Benj Cook | here when every available piece 
owned 40 acres of land near Wat- ; of wood whether branch or stump 
>o, tins county, on which the lis worth saving. The question of 



Citizens Bank, of Grant, h:id a 
mWtgago, and a suit was insti- 
tuted by the administrator to set- 
tle, the estate The widow claim- 
«d\| homestead in the land ana 
opposed the selling of the entire 
tract and the court held a 
homestead of thr> value of $1,000 
•should 



getting coal for fuel at anything 
like a reasonable price is likely 
to soon become a serious one 
hence, I would suggest that ev- 
ery farmer begin at once to use 
up more closely the wood that 
heretofore has gone to waste. It 
is rather slow work to cut a 



be set pfj tp her before [ cord of small limb wood, but 
»!^ re ™ inder ot the tract is enough of this top and branch 
*)ld. The court appointed Thos. | wood will do it and when the 
•Rice and Jasper Sullivan commis- ! cook wants a good and quick 
sioners to assist Maater Commis- fire on a hot summer day, she 

-X? e L££\i ^T ^° ? 1Io .l t0 i wi11 havp a °™thing with ' which 
-tfc^ uidow Tjf Benj. Cook a thous, I to mak- it if we do our part 

and dollar homostead in the 4a j thn-ing t ht* wood-cutting time. No 
acreB - I good farm manager will be con- 

tent to get just enough wood up 
to last thru the busy season. It 
does not take very long after 
there is nearly enough cut to 
a year to complete the job 



Don't Delay. 

Quite a number of subscriptions 
to the Recorder expires with this ' i a 'st 
issue, and it will be very satis- 1 and hav V a litUe 8urp i UB> 



factory to the publisher if they 
be renewed at once. Several have 
run -over and should be attended 
to NOW to avoid a discontinue 
ance. At the beginning of the 
year is the very best time to at- 
tend to this matter. 



Green-White Ghristmas. 

It was a green Xmos in this lo- 
cality while* a few miles noitti 
of here— in fact in the northern 
part of the county— it was u 
beautifully white Christmas, snow 
having been on the ground to the 
depth of three or four inches for 
several days previous to last 
Thursday. 

Deputy Sheriff Hume lodged 
Bertly -Craig, colored, in jail Tues- 
day under the charge of forgery. 
Craig, is charged forged checks 
and notes to the amount of eev- 
«ral hundred dollars on OUte Wil- 
ftams and Walter Sleet, of Heaver 
Wbborhood. Craig had invest- 
^IB an automobile and other lux 
lea, and was cutting a pret.y 
" SWath on his ill gollc i 

funds. 



pf. L. H. Voahrll, of llmon, 
Hjjttded to rofin* fr<ini fai'm 
■ htt sold hia fu in to 



Bone very fine aii inch creoh 
#»» harvested u«< w«*k. I'm 

in, who has Imhmi puttinK op 
for many years *•>» he n< 
! oteaaer, nloer loss 

rhJs i* UUP VHAM, ft>i« 

B*YH lit llaU.o M. 



A shelter of some kind is quite 
necessary to store wood under. 
Most farmers have a wood house 
of some sort but those who have 
not will find it to their interest 
to construct one of some kind. 
A few posts set in the ground 
with poles on top covered with 
old boards will last several years 
and the pleasure and extra heat 
that you will get by not having 
to burn wet wood or that cov- 
ered with snow will more than 
pay you for the cost of the shed. 

It was stated years ago that too 
much could not be said to check 
the wasteful methods of cutting 
off our timbered lands and yet 
in many sections this careless 
slashing goes on, Every care 
should be exercised to preserve 
the forest and make a cord of 
wood, as well as a ton of coal, 
go as far as possible.— C., N. Y. 



Hlalr.—tjf-JBIizaville, 

champion yearling 

county. Last week 



James O. 
claims the 
steer of the 

he shipped .i yearling stiver, bred 
and frd hy htm, Which he solo 
for 18 cents on the Cincinnati 
market, Weighing 1280 pounds. 

bringing mii.ho, which is th» 

higher! pvtee ev«-r brought by n 

v arling sold for beo! In the coon 

I v I'MemiugHbiirg Democrat . 

riuU.i. ii.i i* i, tin, ,,i ib.iinrM 

all hi stiver, sn. h*lng melted into 
stiver her* ft t the U h Mint i ,,i,., 

till l»l*r» Kl<< to be turn, d lulu il I met*, 

(|u»ri«rt mid lotir dollars Thall 
•ruinrnl iu»« found it il»ni»i»er t.. 
in. It Kin ilnlUm than i, , |ji« 

inmket met htlf lllvai lllnaf 

St Uts high. »l , .u. tu a uuiiiuai ..f 
yvers. 



Weed Them Out. i 

If organized labor desires to con | 
vince this country of its absolute 
Americanism it can go far in that ! 
direction by weeding out of its i 
organizations every alien mem- 
ber and by refusing to accept any I 
alien member until these men j 
come certified as citizens of the i 
republic under the provisions of 
the law. 

If the alien is not allowed to 
vote, why should he be made part 
of an organization which seeks 
to control, and dies in many in- I 
stances, control, the political ac- 1 
tivities of the country? 

It is pointed out, and the con- 
tention seems amply sustained by 
facts, that the ranks of organized 
labor are honeycombed with aliens 
and that this element is increas- 
ingly antagonistic to this Gov- 
ernment ; tha£ it has no real 
desire to accept American cit- 
izenship, which requires loyalty 
and devotion to the country and 
its institutions— its schools, its 
churches, its ordered business, its i 
Courts and rational social con-» \ 
ventions. It is proved that these 
men and women are ripe fiedls 
in which the Anarchist, the So- 
cialist, the agitators of sedition 
reap responsive and plentiful har 
vests of antagonism to democracy. 
Why should a person who is not 
a citizen of this country have 
place and vote in the labor or- 
ganizations, of this country? 

We are at preBe.it attending 
to deal with these ravagers and 
ravishers of civilization, eon- 
fronted by a strange and incom- 
prehensible reluactanee on .the 
part of Congress to enact laws 
absolutely essential to the pre- 
servation of the .nation. The 
threat of revolution is common, 
openly made, and made with im- 
munity. The spirit back of the 
strikes in this country is not 
disguised. A leader of the Bol- 
sheviki the other day proclaim- 
ed : "Strikes will be worked up. 
An effort will be made to re- 
duce mine production and break 
up both rail and water produc- 
tion/' He also proclaims the ter- 
rorist policy for the U. S. 

What are wo going to do about 
It? Is the loyal labor of the 
country going to associate with 
collaborate with, fraternize with 
elements which already are at 
work to destroy its sane and con- 
servative policies and traditions? 
We cannot believe it.— Enquirer. 



PUBLIC SALE. 



sold my farm, I will offer for sale at my 
residence on the Dixie Highway, two 

miles south of Florence, Ky., on 

Saturday, Jan'y 10 



The Foll^ing Personal Property : 

7-year old Mare, 8-year old Mare, 3 fresh Cows with calves by their side, 1 Cow will be 
fresh by day of sale, 5 coming 2ryear_oldHeifejS- with, calf, 3. last spring Heifer Calves, 
1 Shorthorn Bull coming 2 years old, 3 dozen Chickens, Rood Wagon with Boxbed and 
Sideboards, Spring Wagon, Buggy, Haybed, 2 -horse Sled, Mowing Machine, Hayrake, 
Riding Cultivator, Single Shovel Plow, Double Shovel Plow, Hinge Harrow, Doubletrees 
and Singletrees, 1 dozen Cow Chains, Cypress Incubator 120 egg capacity, 5-ten gallon 
Milk Cans, Milk Cooler and many articles too numerous to mention. 



Public Sale! 



We will offer for aale on the Alice 

Brown plan . oil 

Wednesday, January 7, 1920 

at 10 o'clock a. in. 
8 Jersey Cows — soon bfl fresh 
I ycarliiiK Heif«r 
I 7-miHitti* old J • • i m i ■ > Hull 
I MnwiiiK machine 
i l.*t Milk Cans 
I Hi'putnloi 
At the nam.. Ulna I will 1 1 4 eermi 

or Improvffd land, and if aold 1 win 

off or 

m. H Hurt**, 1 slubber Tiro Hug 
Kjr and souin plow*. 

una $10 <m ami under. i-«ah ; <m 
■ ■*•! tlouo all Blunt hs ni'illi, pur,- 
uh»«nr lo iilva uoUt with goutl S»uu- 
rlty, payablv In Klt>r*>m'« liana 

W II l.illNMOM, 
M. U. BAaHCH. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

On all sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over that 
amount a credit of 9 months without interest will be given 
purchaser to execute bond with approved security, negoti- 
able and ^payable in the Florence Deposit Bank, Florence, 
Ky., before removing property. * 

O. P. Rouse. 

Sale td~begin at 12 o'clock sharp. 



FOR SALE. 



Uronue Turkeys. Extra flno bred 



keys. 
Mali 



tom, «lre coat Mft; also aeversl n\ leu- 
did young bom* and tutu*. 

MK8. ROHT. CHAMHKHS. 
ojanl Walton, Ky 

PlU»na- Walton HOtt 



>.'■ LOST 

Hetwesn Y%. MlfeihsJI oar Hue and 
Klorenoe hSs>vy ilorae Hlsiikel. 
RBV, OJCRAl.D (ONNOIIY, 

Mt 1'aura (hurph Klortnoe, Ky. 

ujauH 



TAK1 YOUK 



Y rAMM. 




A. E. FOSTER & SON 

FARM SALESMEN AND 

LICENSED AUCTIONEERS 



Ho. S Plkt St w Covington, Ky. 

Will be pleated to talk over with you; either the tile 
or purchase of farm propetty. 



unu 




WaE&&b*i)it<!i. #^&.j 



la-^aa. 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1M0 





SALE 



i 



Having sold my farm, the Old Daniel Bedinger Homestead, half -way between Bichwood and 
Beaver Lick, Ky., I will sell at Public Auction on the premises, beginning at 10 a. m. sharp 



; 




JANUARY 9th, 1920 



HORSES AND MULES-5 year old Gelding ; 6 year old Driv- 
ing- and Work Mare; 8 good work Mules from 4 to 8 years old; 
2 year old Mule; 1 aged Mule. Jack Stock— 5 extra good Big 
Jennets with 3 Jack Colts and 2 Jenny Colts; 2 year old Jennet; 



^. , The Following Described Property: 

CATTLE--13 good Milk Cows all bred and will be fresh soon, 
2 Shorthorn Cows, Shorthorn Polled Durham BulU 4 long year- 
ling Steers, 2 Jersey Heifers, 2 Shorthorn Heifers, 4 coining 
yearling Heifers, yearling Steer. Hogs— 2 Sows and Pigs, 
20 Shoats, will average about 120 pounds. 



SHEEP— 25 Full Blooded HampshireJEwes, 2s good grade ewes. 
Hampshire Buck, Oxford Buck. A Complete Set of Farming 
Implements. Ford Runabout. Feed, Etc.— Lot Timothy Flay 
in barn, 150 barrels good Yellow Corn, 100 Shocks of Fodder. 
Household and Kitchen Furniture, and many other articles. 



Yearling Jennet, and 3 year old fine Black Jack. 
TERMS OF SALE— All sums of $10 and under, cash; on all sums over $10 a credit of 6 months will be given without interest, or 3 per cent, off for cash. Notes payable at the Equita- 
ble Bank, Walton, Ky. 

COL W B. JOHNSON. Auctioneer. 

THE LADIES OF THE CHURCH WILL SERVE LUNCH. 



J. C. BEDINGER, Walton, Ky. 



a 




Jtxt biggest aaset iz % ga*?h 
futU of our customers a*tb to 
stncerelg bnhxt tlje business gnu 
Ijafe gifcen us — < Mws > gour 
(Ulfristmas be <iHerrg nnb tJje 
JNefci Ijfaxx jigger, ^Better anit 
^Busier iljau efrer bfore^ 

Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 



FLORENCE 



» 
• 



DEVON 



♦♦♦♦ 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Miss Lottie Riddell has mumps.' j|iss Julia Coyle is Visiting rel-j 

Russell Cor bin spent Christmas ' atives in Ohio, 
with Mb mother, Mrs. Nettie Cor- Mr. and Mrs. T. "J. Hutsellwerel 
bin. guests at John Taylor's, of Rich-; 

Miss Pearl Long and Carl An- wood, Friday. 
derson spent Sunday at Rossj Mrg Theodore Carpenter and 



♦ :,♦ 

♦ ' ♦ 



GRANT R. D. 






e 
♦ 



BEAVER LICK. 



► ♦♦♦♦♦ 



Geo. 



cows to 



1919 



1920 



We desire to thank our friends and customers for 
their liberal patronage during the past year in mak- 
ing possible this large, serviceable bank. 

It has been a pleasure to do buainess with you 
during the past year and trust that you have been 
benefitted by our SERVICE. 

We begin the New Year with a bigger, better 
bank than ever before and hope that we merit the 
Continuance of your valuable patronage for 1920. 

No business too small to receive our courteous 
attention. 

i 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 
Capital and Surplus, $150,00000. 

W. L. B. ROUSE, President. A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 

EDGAR C. RILEY, Vice-Prw. 
NELL H. MARTIN, Astt. Cashier. L. T. UTZ, Ami. Caalper. 



Rubs'. , 

Ed, McAllister, wife and son, of 
Cincinnati, spent Xmas day witii 
Belle Long 

Misa Eva Renaker spent Wed- 
nesday night with Miss Elizabeth 
i Dell Goodridge. 

Mrs. Brad Sayre and son were 
guests at Ed. Sydnor's several 
days last week. 

Joseph Myers and wife, of Ham- 
ilton, Ohio, spent last Saturday 
at J. R. Whitson's. 

Glad to report J. R. Whitson 
as improving after a serious ill- 
ness of several days. 

Miss Edna Jotters was the week's 
end guest of Misses Clara and 
Helen Smith, of Covington. 

Dr. and Mrs. W, S, Cole and son, 
of Columh:*, Ohio, were guests 
of relatives < here last week. 

Ivan Conrad, wife and daughter, 
Evelyn and J. K. Tanner anu wife 
were guests at Ben]. Long's last 
Sunday. 

Messrs. Geo. and Fritz Drlnken- 
berg were guests of their father, 
Fred Drinkenberg and wife, last 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Emma Aylor and children 
and Mrs. Lee Whitson and son 
were guests of Mrs. Ed. Sydnor 
last Friday. 

Lute Bradford sold his crop of 
tobacco on the Covington loose 
leaf market last week at an av- 
erage of 70 cents, a pound. 

L. M. Rouse and wife entertain- 
ed the following guesc last Sun- 
day: Miss Mary Evalyn Rouse and 



sons, John and Earl, Sundayed at 
Mrs. W. W. Woodward's 

Mrs. Ben Brietow was the guest 
of Mrs. Perry Dixon and Miss Mae 
of Erlanger, Saturday evening. 

Best wishes to the RECORDER 
and its many readers for a hap- 
py and prosperous New Year. 

James W. Bristow and sister 
were guests of Misses Leta and 
Julia Rice, of Latonia, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Dixon enter- 
tained their brother, J. B. and 
sisters, Misses Mary and Jennie, 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles G, Lyne 
are rejoicing over the arrival oi 
a J. ine son, Sunday, Charles U. 
Lyne, Jr. 

Mrs. John Roache, who Is the 
guest /of Lucien Ryle and family, 
of Newport, spent last Saturday 
here with Mrs. T. J. Hutsell, 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Utz had 
for guests, Saturday, B. A. Gloyd 
and wife, Rev. Rover* and family, 
Mrs. Daughters and daughter. 

Mrs. Daughters and daughter, 
Miss Eflie, of Cincinnati, came 
out Friday and will spend a week 
here, guests at Harvey (Jtz'a. 

Mrs. McCoy will have for 



Ward sold two 
R. M. Wilson for $200. 

Lewis Beemon and family speni 
Sunday at Hogan Ryle's. 

Mrs Jane Sutton, Mrs. 
Ryle and R W. Rickards are sick. 

Miss Artie Ryle is nursing Mrs. 



Orvil Loomis, who has been ill, 
is improving. 

J. O. Griffith and wife spent 
Christmas at W. R, Miller's. 
Nelliel Dr. and Mrs. Ryle entertained 
Christmas day with a splendid 
dinner. 



Mabel Hodges, who has typhoid Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Ossman 
fever. ' spent last Monday with Mrs. Sal- 

Mrs S. J. Stephens entertainer) ; lie Adams near Big Bone, 
with a turkey dinner Curing j J. A. Loomis has bought a farm 
Christmas. j of 35 acres one mile south off n- 



Ralph White has accepted a po- 
sition as assistant caahier in the 
Deposit Bank at Grant. 

George Walton, Jr., and Lee 
Stephens attended a ball at Pet- 
ersburg, Friday night. 

Mrs. Anna Ryle entertained 
with a dinner, Tuesday, in honor 
of her son John and his bride. 

Misses Katie Hodges, Lutie Ryle 
and Agnes Chandler had Christ- 
mas entertainments at their 
schools. 

Ira Pope sold the registered 
Shorthorn bull he bought from 
J. H. Walton to Harris Bros,,' of 
Rising Sun. 

David Ryle and family moved 
to Covington last week. He was 
appointed a census enumerator 
for a Covington district. 

William Presser and wife a/e en- 
tertaining a small son since Dec. 
17th, and Wilbur Kelly and Wife, 
a daughter since the 26th inst. 

Everett Clore and family and 



guests this week her daughter, I Mrs. Belle Beemon visited John 



Mrs. Valrandingham and baby. 
Lula Catherine, of Sadieville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey (Ttz ana 
their guests, Mrs. Daughters and 
daughter, spent Sunday with their 
aunt Mrs. Deliah Utz, in Florence, 

W. W. Woodward and Theodore 
Carpenter left Friday morning for 



William Walton, of Burlington, and I Texas, where they will be the 
Dr. Elbert Rouse and family, of guests of Mr. Woodward's father, 
Ludlow. ! James Woodward. 

William Lancaster, a former eit- . Frances Kenney and sister, Misa 
izen of this county, but who has Ella Mae, attended the rook par 
been living in Ohio for _ several j ty at_ the home of their cousin, 



Hogan sad family, near Hebron, 
Saturday. Mrs, Beemon stayed for 
a longer visit with her daughter, 
Mrs. Hogan. 

Not only Christmas bells but 
wedding bells rang here last 
week. The happy couples were 
Thaddie Ryle and Ada Acra, John 
Ryle and Stella Stephens and Paul 
Cook and Viola Stephens. 



years, was buried at Highland 
last Monday. He fell last fall and 
broke one of hiB hips, which, 
with ailments incident to ola 
age, caused his death. The family 
has the sympathy of the commun 
ity. 



VERONA 




Cull DOllbtflll Hint. !<*» it is with Leghorns for the 

I reason that when they become 

When culling a flock of hens at brootty a certain amount of plg- 
the end of the laying season ment is likely to return to the" 
there are si ways a few Individ- shank. One must make due alio w- 
uals that may be classed as doubt- ] anee for this and 
ful. Very often the owner of 
the birds allows sympathy to In- 
terfere with good business. Ac 



goo 
cording to G. W. Hervey, of the 
University of Missouri College of 
Agricugture, it is better to cull 
a olrd that may lay five or six 
more* eggs only this fall than to 
keep her all winter as an abso- 
lute expense. 

A hen may show the character- 
istic body depth of _ three or 
more fingers and yet may have 
but a one finger spread between 
the pelvic bones. This means that 
the Bird has stopped laying but 
her period of non-production has 
not been long enough for the body 
depth to elose up also. She has 
Just reached the point where she 
will be kept at a loss. 

Sometimes a bird may exhibit 
the desired characteristics of both 
good body depth and well-spread 
pelvic bones yet her skin under 
(he fluff may feel tough and 
leathery. Such a hen will invar- 
iably have coarse pelvic bones and 
a coarse breast bone. She may 
hsve had a period of production 
during the summer but her total 
for the year would do* Justify 
retaining hot another season. 

In culling the American breeds, 
the Wyandotte, Plymouth Rook 
and Rhode tatoad Mod, at* la spl 
to bo confuaod by ike ektnk col- 
or toot. TWo toot w 9mt on te» 
luut* with these hastier breeds 



if the bird is 
favorable in appearance other- 
wise it may be profitable to keep 
her over as a breeder for the 
spring season. 

In general, then, the poultry 
keeper when culling must not be. 
influenced by any single factor, 
but must consider all of them. 
The more rigid the culling the 
more capable Is the flock man- 
agement. It is usually safe to 
market at least half of the to- 
tal number of hens at the end 
of the laying season, replacing 
them with pullets. 

Wintering Niotly 

Up to the present time live- 
stock in this county is in fine 
condition and no great amount 
of food has been required So far 
feed could be handled in the most 
economical manner as the ground 
has been frozen for some lime and 
the animals have consumed the 
food instead of trampling It into 
the ground as is the esse during 
wet periods during the winter 

Mew Ferryman. 

Geo W. Terrtlt, new owner <>( 
the ferry, has engaged »• ferry- 
an Lake Halt* who runs a small 
weua Law renow burg «ad 
carrying the mall Mr 
•Misted in the ferry 
tber, Hubert ll.it 



♦ 

e 

e • 

ooeeeOeeeeeeeeeeooooeeooee 

Miss Madge Kennedy has the 
measles. 

A. C. Roberts and wife spent last 
Sunday at J. M. Powers'. 

The first snow of the season 
showed up here last Sunday morn 
ing. 
Elbert Kennedy and family, of 
Illinois, are guests of L. 
s. 

New Bethel church called Bro. 
Payne, last Sunday, for the en- 
suing year. 
Miss Pay Hudson will begin her 



Roy Kenney, of Beaver, Saturday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCoy en- 
tertained the following guests 
last Saturday: Mrs. Craig, of Sa- 
dieville; Geo. Bassett and fam- 
ily, Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Mulber- 
ry, of Devon. 

J. B. Dixon and sisters, Misses 
Mary and Jennie entertained with 
a turkey dinner for the following : 
Their brother, Jerry and family 
! and sisters, Mrs. Perry Dixon and 
daughter, Miss Mae, of Erlanger. 
-_- 

o 

GUNPOWDER. o 

O 



o e 

O PETERSBURG « 

o o 

eeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee* 

A large crowd attended the mo- 
vies Saturday night. 



dependence, Kenton county. 

Howe Cleek and wife, Johnny 
Ryan and Mrs John English 
spent Tuesday in the city. 

O. W. Cleek, Mrs, a *W. Cleek 
and Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Osssxian 
apent last Tuesday in the city. 

Miss Katie McCabe sent 19 tur- 
keys and a coop of chickens to 
the city last Monday that brought 
her $127 net. 

Hamilton Lodge, F. and A. M« 
elected officers for the ensuing 
year, Dec 27th, and enjoyed a 
splendid oyster dinner. 

Joe W. Cleek and Ben Hodges 
sold 1935 pounds of their crop of 
tobacco at the Farmers' Loose 
Leaf at Walton, at $75.98 per 100 
floor average. 

The entertainment at the Bea- 
ver school house, given by Miss 
Anna Cleek, Miss Jane Hance ana 
pupils Christmas night, was a 
success in every particular. Re- 
ceipts, $20.25. 

♦ooosooeeoesoeoosoooooooto 

♦ •; 

♦ WOOLPER HEIGHTS. w 




Henry Wingate and family spent 
Christmas day at Toney Rue's. 

Mrs. R. H. Walker has retimed 
home after a week's visit 
Covington. 

Cabil Beemon and wife, Rue 4 
David Wingate spent Xmas> 
friends in Cleves, Ohio. 

B. E. Aylor and wife spent Si 
day with Mrs. Aylor's mother) 
sister in Hebron neighborhood. 

Charlie Easton and family said 
Mrs. Cad Sullivan and little son 




tTeinHnc 



Bert Clore and wife were pleas- 
ant guests of this writer on 
Thursday of last week. 

Robert Rdbbins, who Is attend- 
, ing college at Lexington. spent 
the -holidays with home folks. 



Alfred Chambers, of Texarkana, spent Saturday at Ed. Eastonm. 
Texas, is visiting relatives here. Herman Wingate visited his un~ 

Lieutenant W. G. Stephens is cle, Charlie Rue, in the Belle view 
here spending the holidays with neighborhood from Friday until 
his parents. ; — { Su n day. : 

Miss Helen Crisler and Mr. He- 1 Mrs. Wm. Siekman had as guesta 
bert Crisler, of Covtrfgton, are Christmas day L. C. Scothorn and 
week-end guests of Mrs. Riley. family, o£ Idlewild ; Geo. Hewetf 

Bro. R. H. Carter and wife are of Burlington, and Miss Blanche? 
to spend the week-end at his | Aylor, of Latonia. 
mother's home in Wiiliamstown. i 

o ! 



rona precinct Jan. 2nd. 

The young people here haye en- 
joyed several dances during the 
holidays, in private homes. 

Walter Vest, who lives two 
miles east of town is ill with 
blood poison, but is improving. 

Miss Nannie Powers, of Rising 
Sun, Indiana, spent the past 
two weeks "with Mr. and Mrs. J. 
M. Powers. 

Miss Marion Johnson, of La- 
Grange, was the guest of her 
grandparents, Mr and Mrs. J. M. 
Powers, during the holidays. 

The Christmas tree at 



Ed. Slayback and family were 

woriToI ^^cens^enunrerat^of' Vol |^J* ""£ S M * B ^1 Christ' 
rona nr«Mnr* T.n 9nrf Geo - £°y le and Mrs. Coyle, Christ- 

mas day. 

Mrs. Bell Clore, of Erlanger, 
was the guest of her sister, Mr* 
B. A. Floyd, last Saturday night 
and Sunday. 

Mrs. Irene Foulk and John Mc- 
Connel, of Ashland, O.. are visit- 
ing friends in this mid Union 
neighborhoods. 

The Christmas exercises at Hope 
ful on the evening of the 24th 
were a success ana were enjoyod 
by a large and attentive au- 



Bro. R. H, Carter and wife were 
remembered by a very substantial j 
gift from both the church ana 
Bible School. 

Mr. and Mrs. .. tan ley Palmer are 
here on a short visit with Mrs. 
Palmer's parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. 
H. Berkshire. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Gridley, of In- 
dianapolis, are spending Christmas 
here with Mrs. Gridley»s parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. B, Berkshire, 

Miss Edna' Riley and brother, 
Thomas Milton, who were attend- 
ing college at Lexington, are here 
for the holidays with their moth- 
er. 

Mrs. Bryd McCord has as her 
holiday guests her sister, Mrs. 



•♦♦eeeeeeeeeeeeee»e#eeeeae< 

S BEBRON 

• 

♦♦eooeooeeooooeooooeo s o oo» 

We wish the Recorder force ana 
readers a happy and prosperous; 
New Year. 

Miss Katie Clayton, of Vanee- 
burg, spent last week- with he* 
parents here. 

James Kelly and wife and How** 
ard Kelly and family spent Friday 
at Moses Aylor's 

The regular annual congrega- 
tional meeting will be held Satwn* 
day, Jan. 3rd, at the church. 

Melvin Jones is moving to tat) 



Emms' WeatX of De hT6., «a £» Z£;»'VSl* Q ~ ,r " J9 
Mrs. Hslhe Groesbeek and Miss ' a B ,n ? ^Km?" L »n a *>«"* and 
Margaret Wentzel. en , ce » * hich ttt recently purchaiV 



garet 

A splendid Xmas entertainment 
was given by the Bible School of 
the Christian church on Sunday 
night, consisting of music, drills 
and tableaux. The decorations 



dlence. The church was beautiful-*, were very elaborate. 



Graded school building, Christmas! S., and the hearts of t 
eve was well attended. Sasta ones were made glad by i 
Claus appeared oo the scene I a nice treat 



( ly decorated, a beautiful musical 
the 'program was rendered by the S. 

he littiq 
resolving 



and distributed many presents to 
the children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker en- 
tertained wit it a family reunion 
on ChrlstmiH day with turkey 
and all the deh>acir» of the sea- 
son. Those in attendance ware 
Harry Moore and wife. Clay Ba- 
ker. Harley Baker,, wife and child, 
of Walton ; MIsm-m Kate and Bva 
Roberta Mrs. Msttie Rsaeoea 
Mioses sfsry. tlraqe and 
rlsasoa, W. m 
A C ftoberts mid wife. 



H P. Uts and wife entertained 
several of their friends at dinner 
last Saturday. It has been their 
custom for several yesrs to enter- 
tain their friends with a dinner 
and social during the holidays, 
and this year was no exception. 
The dinner consisted of turkey 
and the trimmings and all other 
delicacies of the as s son Those 
. , present were Rev. Hoyer, wife 
Rdlths and daughter, Mies Mabel ; Mrs. Al 
JepklM sad wife, > ice Daughters and daughter Miss 
KffK of Cinetnnat^ and others. 



For more than a half a cen- 
tury Petersburg has b^en reMv- 
ing its mail by river from Law- 
renceburg Mr. Luke Holt, our ef- 
ficient carrier, who is eperating 
the Lawrenceburg Ferry, has pur- 
chased s new Chevrolet from L. 
S. Chambers, the local represent- 
ative, and in the future the mall 
and passengers wtH be carried 
from Lawrenceburg to Petersburg 
by automobile. 

All members of Sand Run church 
are requested to bo present oo 
Saturday, Jaa 3rd, at t:M p* an, 
aa there will be huoinsaa of im- 
portsaee to tr« 



KAVtR, Clerk. 



ed. 

Leon Aylor and wife had a* 
guests Christmas day, Hoot. Day 
and wife and John Whiuker and 
Miss Ruble Ryle, of near Prancstr* 
ville. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. U, <iarnetta«M 
sons entertained the young peo- 
ple with a daoce last Saturday 
night. At about 11 o'clock the 
crowd was given a tn-at of ap- 
ples and candy 

Mr. and Mrs. Mo*e Aylor had seV 
oral of their relatives ss 
Isst Sunday They were 
Aylor and family, tleni-y Lea, 
lor and family, Milton Aykar 
family , Kdwar I Raker and (as 
ilv, Prank Ayl.i. and Wlfe^ 
Misses Bestir Aylor and NaM 
Lodge. 



The weather wail 
■ llielwM l>ecerah« 
ty good winter nto-ith 




THURSDAY JAN. 1, 1»20 



fcuoNE COUNTY RECORDER 



f 



HIGH PRICES ARE PAID 

ThorauohbredR Ara Gdd At 
Fancy' Figures 



Fashionable Gatherings at Saratoga 

When Aristocracy of Horae Family 

Are Placed on the Block. 



An astonishing expat.*.- *n the 
thoroughbred horse sales business und 
an amoving increase in thoroughbred 
Ttilues is revealed in the cast up of 
the eastern traffic In running horse 
stock for the fiscal year ending August 
:S1, by E. J. Tranter, president of the 
Foslg-Tlptpn Cojrap^%*, of New York. 
The Faslg-TIpton Company has undis- 
puted control at the eastern sales busi- 
ness now. And the snles in so far as 
thoroughbred yearlings offered in the 
eastern market are concerned are held 
mainly in the month of August and 
conducted in 11 splendidly appointed 
establishment built by Mr, Tranter 
three or four seasons back after the 
best European models, but with certain 
American establishments.. Everybody 
who is anything in the thoroimlibred 
world, or ever hopes to be, flocks to 
Saratoga in August. The thorough" 
bred yearling sales, ami especially 
those held at night under the glare of 
electric arcs, have become social func- 
tions. Men never think of going out 
to the night sales from the- palatial 
cottages aird the great hotels save in 
evening dress. Women attend them 
Invariably In evening dress, or un- 
dress, according to one's point of view. 

The best appreciation of the expan- 
sion of the Uioroughbred auction sales 
business and of the increase in tho- 
roughbred values Is to be obtained by 
comparing the records of l'.HVj with 
the records of 11)17 and IMS. Two 
hundred and seventy-three yearlings 
were led to the auction block in Mil 7 
aud they brought a total of $388,275! 
an average of $1,104 a head. Sixty- 
seven horses of racing age brought 
J110.100, an average of $1,7:1-2.83 a 
head. In 1918 two hundred and thirty- 
five thoroughbred yearlings brought a 
total of $248,620, an average of $1,- 
057.96 a head ; nine brood mares fetch- 
ed $20,050, an average of $2,327.77 a 
head J and 152 horses of racing age 
fetched $200,810, an average of $1,- 
821.12 u head. 

Run Into Big Money. 
More than three-quarters of a mil- 
lion dollars — $879,210 to be exact— was 
realized «t the auction block at Sara- 
toga* for the thoroughbreds the Tran- 
ter Company offered to bidders. Two 
hundred and twenty-seven yearlings 
brought $603,500, an average of $2,- 
658.58 a head; nineteen broodmares 
fetched $130,300, an average of $7,- 
173,69 a head; three stallions brought 
821,800, an average of $7,2(17, and 
eighty-three horses in training fetched 
8117,010, an average of $1,417. These 
figures relate merely to the auction 
sales business. Many horses of vari- 
ous ages have been bought and sold 
privately. Montford Jones paid $40,000 
ln Joire for the 2-year-old Brookholt, 
« son of Ballot. ». C. Hildreth paid 
$17,800 for Dominuque, a son of Peter 
Quince. Hildreth is said to have re- 
fused an offer of $150,000 for the three- 
ear-oM Purchase. Larry Waterbury, 
successful New York broker, paid 
830,000 for the three-year-old Sennlngg 
&..' Mr. Tranter, who keps a close 
Watch on the thoroughbred market. 
erally ertlmates that some two and 
a Half million dollars will have chnng- 
.ed hands in transactions in thorough- 
bred blood before the first of the year 
Many horses of various ages will be 
sold In Kentucky this fall. 

It was thought that the top limit ol 
'American buyers as regards auction 
■ aales prices was reached in the sum- 
i^jnst of 1913. when Mr*. Walter M. .Jef- 
fords, of Philadelphia, paid $15,600 for 
1 t a French-bred yearling by Sweeper oul 
of Znna, which won the Saratoga Spe- 
cial in August under the name oi 
Golden Brook; when Commander J. K 
&&.' Ross, of Montreal, paid $14,300 foi 
a colt by Black Jester out of Primula. 
and Joseph K. Widener paid $14,001 
for a son of Vulcain and Fairy Cold 
fchicb claims Friar Hock, Fair Play 
and Fllttergold for half brothers. Bui 
this theory has been badly shattered. 
Tdn thousand dollars and $15,000 were 
.common prices for good looking 
thoroughbreds last August. A breedet 
offering a youngster that looked like a 
thoroughbred and boasted of a fall 
pedigree who failed to get from $5,001 
to $8,000 for his stuff went back tc 
- Kentucky or Virginia utterly disgusted 

A Few Big Prices. 

, W. Y. Thraves, u Virginian, who l« 

rf about to embark ou u thoroughbred 

jPtOtUCing •enterprise at Long Uidg* 

jRafln in Fayette county, Ky,, paid 

I 824,900 for a yearling son of Ultlmu* 

Offered by John Oliver Keene. Com 

4pander Hoss puld $25,000 for an im 

ported son of Snnster and Marian 

Hood. Philip T. Chlnn, acting for Mr. 

Waterbury, paid $22,50u for a son ol 

9elt »nd Sand Dune that claims the 

•printer The Boy for half brother, W. 

R. Doe paid $15,000 for u brown son of 

Celt and Patricia IV. Commander 

Boss paid $30,000 for Melody, a brood 

SOS** by Meddler oul of Hutluntrae. 

tbjLaras offered at the dispersal suit 

ftHkB Mack ay stud 

It* yearlings from Claiborne mil 

Jertllt studs offered by Arthur I! 

keocfc brought the uuespected lots. 

^H^*\ an fa.erage from Clylhom* 

■071.48 aud for Filer. I it- „f $(j, 

m- Other breeders of American 

t.tbet is ia vugua Just uuw fared 

^HsW »eli— Ad*. 




MAKING WAR ON GRAPE PESTS 



Most Destructive Insect Is Cureulio, 

Which Feeds on Foliage From 

Spring to Fall. 

(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 

In many localities In the eastern 
part of the United States the grape 
cureulio, which feeds upon the leaves 
from spring to frost, Is the most de- 
structive Insect attacking this fruit. 
It may be practically unknown In 
some places, but in uenr-by districts 
may appear in such destructive num- 
bers ns to destroy each year from 35 
to 100 per cent of fruit on all grape- 
vines that do not receive protection. 

AnoUier insect pest that Is a men- 
ace to many grape owners In the east- 
ern part of the country is the root- 
borer, which burrows into the roots 
and causes injury similar to severe root 




pruning. The cureulio can be success- 
fully controlled by arsenical sprays. 
the bulletin says, but the only method 
of combating the borer now known Is 
through cultivation, which destroys 
larvae and pupae in the cocoons, and 
the practice of such cultural methods 
as will Induce vigorous and rapid 
growth of healthy vines. 

The adult cureulio is small and In- 
conspicuous, and a grape grower will 
frequently lose within a short time an 
entire crop of fruit without being 
able to determine the nature of the 
enemy. The grapes will suddenly be- 
come wormy and will be ruined. At 
about the time Concord grapevines 
bloom the cureulio beetles emerge 
from hibernation and appear upon the 
leaves. The pest feeds on the upper 
Surface of the leaves throughout the 
season. Ants are their natural ene- 
mies, and some forms of ground- 
dwelling Spiders feed upon them. A 
number of parasites aid in their de- 
struction. 

In several cases practically com- 
plete freedom from attack has been 
obtained by upplying two sprays of 
lead arsenate, three pounds of the 
paste form to 50 gallons of water, the 
first Just after the blossoms have 
dropped and the second three or four 
weeks later. 

Like the cureulio, the grape root- 
borer Is Inconspicuous in all of its 
stages. The borers rarely kill the 
Tines, but cause infested plants to lin- 
ger for years, making meager annual 
growth and bearing reduced crops of 
fruit, the owner often being unaware 
of the cause. The newly batched 
larvae feed entirely on the roots, both 
large and small roots being attacked. 
The borer feeds over so wide an area 
that digging for the pest as a prac- 
ticable method of destruction Is out 
of the question, and even soil funil- 
pants are, for the same reason, of 
doubtful value. The use of. fertilizers 
and the application of other cultural 
methods which promote rapid, vigor- 
ous growth, offsetting the root prun- 
ing caused by the borer, are the best- 
known methods of controlling the 
pest. 




PRUNING A NEGLECTED TREE 



Good Plan to Leave Some of Water 

8prouts for Year to Provide 

Food for PlanL 

In prunlug a badly neglected tree It 
la a good plan to leave some of the 
water xprouts for a year. This be- 
comes of more importance out the prun- 
ing becomes not* seven, tm tba wa- 
ter sprouts furotah move leaf eniiass 

provide feed for Mm eattre pleat 
fne second year wnter oproats pay be 

teved. 




REMOVE MALES FROM FLOCK 



Infertile Eggs Are Best to Keep and 
Coat Less to Produce — Send the 

Roosters to Market. 

(Prepared by the United States Depart 
merit of Agriculture.) , 

Produce Infertile eggs. They are 
worth more, as they keep better and 
they cost less to produce since there 
are no roosters to feed. No expense, 
education, ability, or labor other than 
catching and killing or selling the 
roosters are necessary. Remove the 
males at once. 

While eggs are plentiful some should 
bo preserved for the winter months, 
as they will be scarce and high priced. 
It costs but little In time, money and 
labor, and Is so easily done that it is 
only common sense to do It. Use 
fresh, infertile eggs and let custom- 
ers know that they can get such eggs 
#er preserving. Those who have never 
preserved eggs should get In touch 
with the county or home demonstra- 
tion agent, the state extension direct- 
oi, or the United States department 
of agriculture. 

Now is the time to begin culling 
flecks. Send the roosters to the chop 
ping block or the market. Eliminate 
nil weaklings and deformed chicks 
Get rid of the chick that stands along 
the side of the coop with Its wings 
down, Its feathers ruffled, eye shut, 
and head down. Do not keep 'a single 
chick that you are not sure it will pay 
to raise. 

Shade, clean fresh water, cleat 
coops, and colony houses, and good 
ventilation and plenty of room during 





Chandler Leads Where 
Performance Counts 

WHEREVER men ask much of their automobiles the 
Chandler dominates. In the mountain countries it per- 
forms as many cars with larger motors do not perform. Climbing 
steep grades with the sharpest turns on high, creeping up and 
up at six or seven miles an hour on 'high without a miss or a < 
skip or a sign of effort, where others shift, the Chandler holds 
for its driver the thrill of really satisfactory motoring. 

In country roads of mud or sand, and in the congested 
traffic of crowded city streets, this same power and this same 
flexibility show their qualities. 

The Chandler leads the whole six-cylinder group so distinctly 
because it is such a good car and so fairly priced. 

There's no better time than NOW to place your order. 

SIX BEAUTIFUL TYPES OF BODY » 

Seven-Passenger Touring Car, SI895 Four-Passenger Roadster, $1895 

Four-Passenger Dispatch Car. 11975 
Seven-Passenger Sedan, 12895 Four-Passenger Coupe, 12795 Limousine, S3395 

All prices/, o. b. Cleveland 

S. O. SC HANKER, Ef langer, Ky 

Write or Phone for Demonstration: 
CHANDLER MOTOR CAR COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO I 



At 



Shade and Clean Coopa Furnished 
Young Chicks en Government Farm 
at Beltsville, Md. ' 

the night are of the greptest Impor- 
tance in growing healthy, strong, vig- 
orous birds, whether they are for meat, 
eggs, or breeding. 

Growing chicks should have plenty 
of good, nourishing food. Bone meal 
should be fed liberally to^those intend- 
ed for layers or breeders; 

Do not forget to continue the flgh! 
on mites and lice. They must be fought 
nil the Mme In all sections and in all 
seasons. 



— Both Phokxs — - 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 

Boon* House, 

BURLINGTON, ■■ KY. 

Prompt; Attention te all Calls. ^ 



MONEY MADE WITH CHICKENS 



Tennessee Woman Cleared $379 
Five Years With Two Settings 
of Wyandotte Eggs.' 



In 



(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of AeTiculture.) 

Two settings of White Wyandotte 
eggs, costing $2, in five years' time net- 
ted $379 profit for a woman poultry 
club member In Madison county, Tenn. 

The first two settings of eggs were 
bought In 1914. In 1915, nine hens and 
six cockerels were sold for $4 ; Id 
19.16 43 hens and two cockerels brought 
$10; in 1917 flOO worth of eggs and 
birds were sold; in 1918 the value el 
the flock, both fowls kept and sold, 
was $316; a total of 9429. Much of 
the feed was waste products of the 
farm and cost nothing 

The total cost of production was: 
Original settings, |S» two breeding 
pens, $30; feed, $10; advertising, three 
years. $8— a total of $Sf>. The profit of 
$379 was made possible ■because of the 
smallness of the enterprlae and the 
fact that most of the feed for the hlrda 
had no money value. 



FOR SALE 

A $200 Piano Player, Mahogany 
finish, in excellent condition, can be 
used on any style piano, and about 
30 music rolls. Would make a fine 
Christmas present. Price, 960. 
MRS. W. M. COREY, 

Phone 2X Erlanger, Ry. 

BULL CALVES FOR SALE. 

High Grade Holstein Bull Calves, 
sired by Registered Bull, out of good 
producing dams. 
THEO. CAPENTER A 80NS, 
R. D. 2, Walton, Ry. 
Both 'phones. dUec26 



t<¥e/¥W¥¥¥¥¥**»¥»AJ»*A**** A ! 



FOWLS YIELD $1.14 AN HOUR 

Indiana Woman Has Demonstrated 
That This Amount Can Be Made 

by Keeping Chickens. 

(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture > 

A side line for the fanner's wife 
which yields $1.14 for every hour she 
puts Into It la worth the consideration 
of every farm woman A Wabash 
county (Indiana) woman has demon- 
strated that this amount can be made 
by keeping chickens. Last year the 
local county agent interacted this 
woman In keeping a farm wmjtry 
fleck, sad ae a res* It sflm ptudaeed a 
not me flt of S tfUtV like bemt en sc- 
ensete aetuMt ef her work and found 
st the eflfl of the Season that eke bed 
received $1 14 an hour for the lime eke 
sctuejly devoted U earing fur bar 



Ship by Truck 

We are again in position 
to do your general truck- 
ing — tobacco and live- 
stock a specialty. 

Carpenter Bros., 

Florence, Ky. 

Consonants* Phone: 
Burlington 117. 



o-dee-14 



Attention Alto Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing on all makes or cars. 

Starter and generator work a 

specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me e trial. 

Earl Ml. Ay Ion 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



Raw Furs Wanted 

Hif heat Prices aed SUmsWd 
Grade HERBERT KIRK, 
Burlington, Ky. 




Out 

They Go! 



Silly cityward-heelers like to kid them- 
selves about "delivering the farmer 
vote." In Ontario they had notions 
like that last fall — and the farmers took 
the bit in their teeth, kicked the poli- 
ticians out and elected a farmer 
government. Nov/, at the beginning 
of an election 'year, is a good time for 
our own politicians to take a leaf out 
of the Canadian notebook, says 



ISe COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

For the farmers of America are united 
in thought and action as never before. 



Consider the National 
Farm Bureau Federation 
—no politician can lead 
those men by the nose I 
Pulling together, they 
have determined, in ef- 
fect, that the farmer 
shall no longer be the 
national goat. Acting 
together, they can prove 
that the fanner is not a 
profiteer, and they can 
have about anything 



they want. Every farmer 
should know what the 
united farmers are doing 
these days. And so he 
should read the Great 
National Farm Weekly— 
THk COUNTRY GEN- 
TLEMAN. A year's sub- 
scription will cost you 
only $1 and it will keep 
you up to date on every 
farm question. Order— 
today. 



through me 

52 BIG ISSUES-ONE DOLLAR 

Eva May Ri££8, 

ERLANGER, KY 

Phone ErL 50-Y 

An authorised tubirrlpt Ion reOrsMBtstlvs of 

l»a!aoWfloomJesro*1 
Uaejn 01.11 



••♦♦♦eeeee+aeeeeeeeeeeeeee eee+eeeeeeeeeeee* 

DO YOU TAKE THE RECORDER? 

Try It One Year - You'll Like 
Only 91.60 the Tear 



tea 



All 



■* 



♦♦ l * MM» HM t y » 

TAEJs YOUat CtUWTY l»Al*R 

♦++».» » » » ♦ h hh eeeeoeeej^eete^i^jSj* 




It. 







liisissiiiifiBfiiriftfl 



/ 



\ 

* 





Vol. xxxxv 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY JANUARY 




1920 



$I.5(J Per leaf 



No 15 



— 



THE NJmitiALFMM^ 
BUREAU MEETING 



How the Chicago Meeting and 
the Western Farmers Look- 
ed to a N. Y. Delegate. 

This meeting was called to form 



fce 



1 -»..'.- L .-._ . 



__ o — - 



at ion that might be able, no* only 
to strengthen and heip the coun- 
ty and biate work, but also to 
secure a square deal for the 
farmer in tne national field. The 
delegates from 33 States were 
present, coming from statOb dif- 
fering in organization, problems 
and economic conditions, but an- 
imated by common i.ieais. While 
the delegates differed as to sfume 
of the details they were prac- 
tically a unit as to the under- 
lying, principles which should gov 
or li. Tne first and most prominent 
of these was the uncompromising 
Americanism which cropped ouc 
again and again ; in the reply, by 
S. L. Strivings, of New Yora, to 
tne address of welcome in which 
he said : 'Anyone who raises the 
red flag in America should be 
run ouc of the country at the 
point of a bayonet, 1 ' and in the 
resolutions adopted as follows: 

'■We unqualiiiedly assert our 
loyalty to the principles of the 
freedom of the people, under our 
American institutions, and while 
recognizing the right of any 
and every class of our people 
to associate themselves for ma- 
terial benefit, we Just as strongly 
assert the right of every Ameri- 
can citizen to the free and un- 
hampered privilege of disposing of 
his labor or products thereof as 
he may individually desire.'' 

The same spirit was also shown 
in the discussion on the floor when 
delegates were reminded that the 
country was looking to the far? 
mers as the great sane conser- 
. vative element of the population 
Which had not gone on strike for 
a six-hour day or a 100 per cent 
raise in wages, but as usual was 
Working eignt hours a day twice 
a day, once before dinner and once 
after dinner to feed the world. 

After Americanism was evident 
the unalterable determination oi 
the delegates to secure thru unit- 
ed action a "square deal 1 ' for the 
farmers of the nation. Hereto- 
fore the farmer has very large- 
ly been voiceless or represented 
by those with whom other inter- 
ests have been paramount. It is 
hoped that this organization may 
furnish a medium through which 
all the Farm Bureaus of the coun- 
try may speak with authority on 
matters of national concern to 
farmers. 

Not all the Southern States were 
represented, and the delegates 
from the South who were present 
seemed most anxious to find out 
alt they could about the North- 
ern methods and organizations, 
and willing to adopt' the good 
things discovered. Their attitude 
of mmd was shown by one dele- 
gate who said he would have to 
gO hornet and not only raise 
money enough to join the Nation- 
Federation but that he would have 
to reorganize their State. ^ 

The "corn-fed'' delegates from 
the Middle West wore a husky 
lot, and came to the convention 
with definite ideas of what they 
wanted and how to get it. While 
they did not differ from tjhe 
other delegates in fundamentals, 

■ they did differ on some details. 
They were after quick results, 
and as a means to that emu 
wanted a large amount of funds, 
immediately available. They had 
a ''vision" of fighting the pack- 
era and the elevator ring with big 
lawyers, big funds, and big nois- 
es. This involved the levying of a 
big membership fee of from 50c 
to $1 for each member of the 
State Federation. This would 
have automatically put all but the 
corn belt out of the game. 

New York also had a "vision,,' - 
but it was not such a vision 
of dollars as a vision Of service, 
and they could point to the arx 
complishmenrs of New York State 
Federation on an expenditure of 
less than $2,000 in 1919 as a prac 
tical demonstration of their view, 
New York backed by New Eng- 
land, Dixie and the Pacific coast 
finally won out, and the member- 
. sip f \*r was assessed on the ba- 
sis of ten per cent of the mem- 
bership fees paid into the coun- 
tties affiliated with the State Fed-, 
eration and levied on the basis of 
membership as of December 31 of 
of the previous year, and paya- 
ble in advance quarterly, January, 
A ril, July and October. This will 
let all sections of the country par- 
ticipate and automatically 'adjust 
the payments so that the State* 

^ having a low membership fee will 
pay less than the Middle Wee*, 
where the farmers are worth from 
$70,000 to $125,000, and where the 
membership fee ranges from $5 to 
$15. The vital thing was to get 
things so arranged that every sec- 
tion of the country could afford 
to come In. * 

California sent a strong dele- 
gation, and they had a decided 
Influence m shaping the policies 
of the meeting. They said (alitor 
nla waa strewn with the wreck* 
of co-ojreratlve associations that 
that died of too much money, ami 
whore the carcass waa there the 
husunrds would be gathered to- 
aether, and they stood for • care- 
ful and conservative program. 
Utto of the out si i« tulkng thing* 
■■alUig waa th-l thai Mi- 
ter the delegates front the differ 
•at section* beeaase ai iueut«u 
the hotter they liked esefc uthar. 
Tta* L«Mtvet«tfcu« d+aea— *Ttt»1 that 



New York was ahead of most of 
the other States in organization 
and in accomplishments to date. 
Many of the States are still bus- 
ily engaged in getting their State 
and county organizationa in shape 
to function properly, and to date 
have very little but membership 
campaigns to show. Another year 
will change all this, and give 
the farmers an organization thor- 
oughly articulated* from the in- 
dividual farmer to a rational ma- 
chine that can deliver the goods. 

The delegates from New ling- 
land ran true to type, and led 
by the delegate from Vermont 
stood for a sane program that 
would give the farmers an Instru- 
ment responsive to their control, 
and that would help to realize 
their ideas of a better country 
life, economically, socially and 
spiritually. "New York secured th»> 
vital things for which she con-, 
tended; partly (because many of 
the other States looked to New 
York as the .pioneer in the move- 
ment and also largely thru the 
team work of the delegation, the 
influence of some of the silent 
delegates being the most potent) 

It really begins to look as tho 
the time was drawing to a close 
In which economic conditions were 
so shaped that the cost of living 
was kept down by forcing the 
farmers to feed the city at less 
than the cost of production ; that 
legislators who want to regulate 
the sun will have to think about 
the farmefr rather than about 

folf, and that it will no longer 
e safe to pretend to do some- 
thing for the farmer and then do 
something to the farmer-*- Wicks 
bills, 'farm labor specialists, the 
farmer urged to cooperate to ted 
the world by the TJ. S. Govern- 
ment and then prosecuted when 
he does if, etc. There is real need 
for this organization, aind itp 
atrength will be In the complete 
organization, sound principles on 
which it is based, and the 
strength and character of the of- 
ficers and executive committee.— 
The Rural New Yorker. 



PERMISSION 



HEART TO HEART TALK 

Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D. 
"If any man thirst, let him 
come unto me and drink.'' Jesus 
stood and spoke these precious 
words on the great day of the 
feast, when the people— tired, dis- 
tressed, ready and helpless were 
thronging about him. His loving 
heart was full of tender compas- 
sion and he longed to comfort, 
bless and save them. The Holy 
Spirit often compares the bless- 
ings of salvation, to living water 
and Jesus only has that living 
water to bestow. Oh, I love by 
pen, tongue and life to tell out 
to helpless, needy creatures about 
the infinite saving power of the 
Christ I believe lit, love and long 
to all men everywhere to accept 
and serve. Left to ourselves, 
we never, never would know 
Christ Jesus. But, he loving con- 
strain* us. Be stood and cried, "If 
any man thirst, let him come unto 
me and drink.'" My friend, have 
you come to Jesus for the water 
of life— refreshing, satisfying? Do 
you desire to know him? If so, 
he says, "Come unto me and 
drink.'' Come without money. 
Come without precious prepara- 
tion. Come without doubt or gain- 
saving. Come if you never -before; 
felt need of him, or the least de- 
sire to know him. Come though 
ill and sinfnl. Come to Jesus be- 
cause he bids you come. Ask him 
to give you the living water. Ask 
and expect to receive and bless. 
He longs to receive and save you. 
Believe his own word and act up- 
on it. "Him that comoth unto me, 
I will in nowise cast out.'' Come, 
come now, and. I assure you, you 
will no longer be a stranger to 
his saving grace. 
Union, Ky. 



Granted By French Government 
For Removal of 20,000 
American Dead to U. S. 

The French Government has 
granted permission for the re- 
moval -of the bodies of 20,000 
American soldiers buried in France 

to thft TTntt^vl StntPH. Thrt hnHina 

to be removed are those buried 
in cemeteries outside the zone of 
the armies, and do not include 
those gathered into big American 
cemeteries 'in the army zone. 

It is understood that the policy 
of the American Government will 
be to remove to the U. S. 
those bodies requested by 
tlves of tho dead soldiers. 
number of such requests to 
been made is not known. 



\ 



Correct Dope is This 



A Splendid Man,— In looking ov- 
*r the vote cast at the kist elec- 
tion it is surprising to know that 
the Sixth Congressional District 
gave Governor Morrow a majority 
of nearly three thousand votes 
over Governor Black. This Is the 
first time in the history of the 
district that a Republican can- 
didate ha* received a majority ov- 
er the Democrat. We notice that 

Ln lain Pnnappouman Rnusn rnnniv* 

ed a majority pf 4417 over Chas. 
W. Nagel, Republican, for Con- 
gress. In 1912 Congressman Rouse 
received a majority of 7734 over 
D. B. Wallace, Republican. In 1914 
the Republican party did not nom 
inate a candidate, the Progres- 
only i slves nominated Emmett Orr. That 
rela- ' year, 1911, Congressman's Rouse's 
The j majority over Mr. Orr was 17,329. 
"""> In 1916 Congress nan Rouse receiv 
ed a 



BOONE COUNTY BANKS 

To Furnish Customers Kentuc- 
ky Farm Account Books 
Free of Charge. 



YANK IN "WET" BERLIN 

PITY FRIENDS AT HOME 

Berlin, Jan. 2.— In the midst of 
the merrymaking incident to Ber- 
lin's second after-the-war New 
Year's eve, thoughts of •arid" U. < 
S. recurred to Americans who are 
in the city. Every now and then, 
at the Adlon and Bristol Hotels, 
where Americans assembled, some 
one was heard to remark : 

'•I wonder what they're drink- 
ing" on Broadway tonight?** 

Berlin did not suffer anv dearth 



have 

i ed a majority of 12,012 over John J 
These 20,000 bodies aro scatter- R, Shepherd, Republican and in j 
ed in 600 cemeteries, the largest 1918 Congressman Rouse received 

:~.U ...... !•« D.....,- ...U n _... _ > ;. _» ... . n-. . l"__JI 



The farmers in the county, as 
well as the entire- country, are 
facing a need for isy stem atie man 
aeement and business records. 

Farming today is noi the hit 
or miss, haphazard business it 
was twenty, or even four year* j of beverages, thanks to the '-hole 
ago. . The farmer does more buy- j in the West'' through which li- 
ing and selling, and handles more quid refreshments found its way 
money now in some months than . to the capital. All reservations at 
he did formerly in a year's busi- j hotels were gone days ago, and, 
ness. I because of tho large number of 

Th? business of the entire world | foreigners in the city, the Adlon 
today is fast getting on a cost of and Bristol hotels had the big- 



two of which are in Brest, where* 
there are about 5,500 graves of 
men who died of influenza. 

Other large cemeteries outside 
the army zone are situated in Bor- 
deaux, Nantes, St. Nazaire, Tours, 
Le Mans and other supply cen- 
ters. ; 

COST OF IMMODESTY. 



Will Have a Big Sale 

than go to Florida 

C. "W. Lassing, of Union neigh- 
borhood, called at this office one 
day the past week and arranged 
for advertising a big sale of 
live stock, farm produce, etc., on 
the 16th of this month. To make 
comfortable those who attend the 
sael, a good, free luhch will be 
served at the noon hour. In a 
few days after the sale Mr. and 
Mrs. Lassing will leave for Flor- 
ida, probably to make their home 
there in the future. 

A Pleasing Suooest. 

The dansant given by Zimmer 
and Wingate at Hebron on New 
Year's night was a very pleasing 
success from every standpoint 
The chivalry and beauty of the 
surrounding country was there in 
force and not a single occurrence 
marred the pleasure of the gath- 
ering. The music furnished for 
the occasion was an inspiring fea- 
ture and the young people trip- 
ped the light fantastic until the 
old year passed out and 1920 was 
ushered in. 



Insufficient Clothing Worn By < iirls 
Harmful to Morals. 

Minneapolis Tribune. 

Immodest dress by women of the 
day is not peculiar to any one 
country. It prevails in an amaz 
Ing extent in the United States, in 
Great Britain, in France and prob 
ably in other countries. What has 
given so strong an impetus to it 
is largely conjectural, but pre- 
sumably it is one of the social 
reactions from the soberer con-* 
duct, thought and feeling of the 
war period. 

If girls cherish a thought and 
hope that they enhance their 
chances of a happy marriage, or 
marriage at all, by a free reveals 
ment of physical charms, they are 
deluding themselves. With com- 
paratively few exceptions th? 
man who puts his mind seriously 
to the marriage project looks 
about him for the womanly wo- 
man, one of whose fundamental 
charms is modesty. He envisages 
such a woman as likely, above 
others, to have the qualities re- 
quired in a life mate whom he 
can honor, love* and trust. 

Men are none too good at best. 
Indeed, as ' a class, they are too 
bad at best, but about the surest 
way to make them worse Is for 
women to appeal, by dress or 
otherwise, to their grosser na- 
tures. It is enough that defi- 
cient draping of the female fig- 
ure exert a harmful influence in 
terms of sex, but atop of that is 
the fact that it is a menace to 
health and an injustice to chil- 
dren yet unborn. 

HOW TO PUT THE 

ROADS ON THEIR FEET. 

The readjustment of the rail- 
road situation is undoubtedly a 
vexatious problem, but its settle- 
ment is the issue upon which 
return of the Nation to normal 
conditions is most Ifcrgely depend- 
ent. Under .whatever plan the 
return Is made, there is bound 
to ensue a longer or shorter per- 
iod of unjointednea* before the 
normalities of railroad operation 
on a peace basis shall have been 
established, and the sooner the 
matter is finally disposed of • the 
better for the country. The Gov- 
ernment would be committing a 
fatal blunder in handing back the 
roads with no provision made for 
assistance in operation pending 
the successful working out of the 
new system. Under the best of 
conditions the railroad manage- 
ments would find it a difficult and 
and tedious process to place these 
properties M on their feet.'' For a 
time, at least, the Government 
must stand as financial agent for 
the roads. That is a conclusion 
that cannot be dodged. The guar- 
antee by which the restored prop- 
erties, including the leas fortunate 
short lines might be guaranteed 
against bankrupt conditions pend- 
ing the working out to a success- 
ful issue V>f their i*w policies, 
would seem to be a bound en du- 
ty on part of the Government 
that has hold them under com- 
pulsory confiscation atad which 
has made a poor job in the mat- 
ter of restoration of railroad 
wreckage. 

The public will have to pay for 
bringing the railroads out of their 
condition of distress. If the Gov- 
ernment is not disposed to foot 
the bill it Will be exacted out of 
the people in the shape of in- 
creased tariffs. Out of their past 
experiences we believe the peo- 
pel will be disposed to call upon 
the Government for fair and just 
treatment for *he railroads in the 
final arrangements for return of 
thi'so properties.- Charlotte N. C, 
Observer. 



DELCO-LIGHT 



Kl< . HI. Unlit unit power for I. ■• lltun 
<mi in* p«)lii|i fur poor Unlit. 




PRANK A. AVI Hftl 

thslSf Itt Onion. Light FnMhwtt, rhmmm 

•tuts iiu* a. t**i«atuu, a , 



a majority of 10,197 over Virgil 
Weaver, the Republican candidate. 
If the Democratic party in the 
Sixth District wants to redeem 
the district it behooves them to 
renominate Congressman Rouse or 
the district is likely to find 
itself again in the Republican col- 
umn. The writer spent six years 
in Washington as Secretary to the 
late, lamented Senator James, and 
during that time, had many mat- 
ters of public 'interest to handle 
in connection with Kentucky Con- 
gressmen, and can say without 
criticising the others, that Mr. 
Rouse was always on the job and 
ready to go to "the front tor 
his district. Kentucky has no more 
valuable Representative In Con- 
gress and the people of the 6th 
District can congratulate them- 
selves upon having a man of his 
untiring energy, who never misses 
an opportunity to do all he can 
for his constituents. — Danville 
Advocate. 



Operated en far Appendicitis 

John Wingate, an old citiien of 
McVllle, w\iB operated on one 
day last week for appendicitis, He 
recovered from thi» operation 
nicely. 

Miss Alio* Walton, daughter Of 
Mrs. Kllsa Walton, w«» stricken 
by spiiritdi' HU While » lilting it 
tts*n**d Mtgfi's in She Mktvlew 
nalflsKM'lMfA lest Week Mho was 

rlrwstt, iwl VNWI, of Hu 
ton, removed the appMulu, aim 
she is recovering uie«4y frum the 
onsrstlon. 



in waa 

'■X 

iirttaf. 



GRAVES OF YANKS 

RECHECKED. 

Paris, Jan. 1.— American army 
officers believe but few" unident- 
ified bodies will lie among Amer- 
ica's soldier dead in Prance when 
the Army Graves Registration Ser 
vice completes a thorough recheck 
ing of records now in progress. 

Every grave record is being 
checked against the army's casual- 
ty list. Each little white cross— 
or six-pointed star over Jews- 
is having an embossed aluminum 
strip placed on the back, dupli- 
cating the name, rank, Organiza- 
tion, already painted on the mar- 
ker. This is being done asl a 
precaution against the possibil- 
ity of winter weather wearing 
away the stenciled information. 

Almost 70,000 American boys are 
buried in the eleven districts of 
Prance, Belgian battlefields and 
the Duchy of Luxemburg. Thero 
are 38 cemeteries of 300 or • more 
graves, cared for by discharged 
soldiers. The largest of theee in 
Romagne, north of Verdun, where 
,lie 23,000 of our men. 

The next in size is that at Thiau 
court, with 4,500 graves. 

A number of those who fell in 
battle are sleeping in British and 
French military or the French 
communal cemeteries. A few were 
left where they first were put in 
the ground, as in the Vosges 
Mountains. 

All graves are under the care of 
the commanding graves officer in 
the 11 districts, and a caretaker 
watches over them. Officers make 
periodical inspection. Where prac 
tical grass has been sown on the 
battle burry grounds, and in the 
spring this work, previously ham 
pered by the task of grouping 
the bodies, will be carried on. 

Tobacco Buyer is Arrested. 

Paris, January 1. — John Doe 
Fuqua, a young man claiming Vir- 
ginia as his home, was arrested 
here today on a wairant sworn 
to by the managers of two to- 
bacco warehouse companies. Re 
is charged with falsely represent- 
ing himself to be a buyer for a 
large Virginia tobacco company. 
He bought liberally during the 
past 10 days, but it is alleged 
that none of his purchases have 
been paid for, and that he pick- 
ed the beat of the crops ano 
resold the tobacco on the floors, 
collecting the money. Advices 
from Virginia state he Is not aut li 
orized to represent the company 
In question. 



gest receipts they ever had. 

MORROW DENIES CANDIDACY 

Louisville, Jan, 2.— The Louis- 
ville Times to-day prints a denial 
from Governor Edwin P. Morrow 
that he is a candidate for the 
Republican Vice Presidential nom- 



production basU. We*, must keep 
some records by which w-e can at 
least approximate cost of pro-: 
duel ion, if we hope to compete 
with easier organized business 

It has long been recognized that 
bankers a;'e good business men, 
and that th?y are successful. 
They keep records. They believe 
in keeping accounts and" business I jna'tjo"/, 
records so strongly that they are j Mr. Morrow is quoted as having 
furnishing Farm Account Books to | saia he did not wish his name to 
their customers free of charge, be used in that connection ano 
All the banks in our county, save t hat 'such talk has a tendency 
two, have bought a supply of j to confuse and embarrass whatev- 
these farm account books to fur- j e r plans and policies I may for- 
rish their custome -s who feel | niulate'' as Governor, 
that the book will be of value to j Mr. Morrow's statement came 
them. I on the heels of a meeting of, Re- 

This Kentucky Farm Account j publican party workers here, 
Book has been prepared by the \ Wn ere tentative plans were made 
Farm Management Department ol to present Mr. Mtorrows name as 
Kentucky and it is believed to , a candidate in various state pri- 
be the most simple form of ac- 
count book that will entirely 
cover the vear's farm business 
that could be prepai-ed. The far- 
mer will find it much easier kepi 
than the blank note book in which 
one must set down his original 
memora ndoras. 



manes. 

Tests Prove Bovine Origin. 

Frankfort.— Tests show that the 
tuberculosis afflicting 8 per cent 
of the children in Kentucky is of 
bovin*? origin. This fact was dis- 
closed here by Dr. S. F. Mussell 
man, State Veterinarian, in his re- 
port to the Livrt Stock Sanita- 
tion Board. 

During the year a total of 14,059 
animals have been examined. Of 
this number 349 animals were 



Drive Being Pushed. 

The membership drive for the 
Boone County Farmers' Bureau is 
being pushed this week, and ~ a 
permanent organization will he 
formed following the drive. , 

This move seems to be very pop- slaughtered as tubercular 
ular in many parts of the court- • In the hog cholera work a total 
try, the farmers recognizing in It of 94,448 head were treated, of 
many ways in which they are to 
be benefitted. Every farmer in 
Boone county will be given an 
opportunity to become a member 
of the Bureau which it is- pro- 



which 60 per cent recovered. The 

loss to the owners of hogs in 

< this state has been reduced from 

*1 .500,000 in 1916 to $500,000 in 1918, 

and if the price of hogs was the 

posed" to "have in'fulloperatlon i same now as in 1916 the loss 

by early spring. If you do not w °uld be less than $200,000 The 



by 

understand the program of the 
Bureau get posted as soon &s 
possible and be ready to givethe 
solicitors your answer to their 
request to Join. 

Petersburg Baptist Church. 

This, booy of Christian people 
was organized about four and a 



board will ask for an additional 
appropriation of $11,000. 



1,891,929 Autos Built 

In America in 1919. 

New York, Jan. 2.— The Nation- 
al Automobile Chamber of Com- 
merce announced today t that mo- 
tor vehicles produced in 1919, jn- 



*£i J^f f g °-^, R fOUr 5n ma if eluding passenger and commercial 
and eleven females-15 in alL machi ^ totaled W91i9M , rep- 

About two and a half years ago resentin ^ a wholesale valuation 



fl w u j2i. .T ua * i-Tft- resenting a wholesale 
they dedicated a handsome little | f | 1)80 7,594,580. Passenger car pro 
church budding with some out- . £ « t w ; li5 8 bl 7 8 7 vehicles, as 
standing indebtedness provide^ t rf in ' m Truc r pf0 

for. All of this has been paid d * advanced from the pre- 



off. They are grateful to their 
brethren who have aided them. 

When they called the writer, 

being desirous of locating him in 

their midst, they were constrained 

j to purchase a parsonage in which 

j to house him. This they proceeded 

to do. 

The latter part of October they 



vious high record 
to 305,142 in 1919. 
exported had a v 
000. 



Pitcher- 



At the parsonage of Big Bone 
Baptist church, on Wednesday af- 
began a series of meetings with ternoon, Dec. 3Ut, 1919, Rev. O. C, 
Rev. Dr. U L. Henson, bf Cov- . p e \ton, D. D., Pastor, officiating, 
ingtoh, doing the preaching. Sev- | Mr. Roy Pitcher, of Hamilton, Ky., 
enteen were added to the mem- ; and Miss Elizabeth Hodges, of 
bership, which was thus brought i p,ig Bone Springs neighborhood, 
to 89. This growth in four and a J The ceremony was w itnesaed 4>y 



half years was remarkable, con- 
sidering the circumstances. 

The church was asked for $2,000 
in the great 75-Million Dollar 
Campaign. They have responded 
with cash and subscriptions with 
$3,175. 

To put a kind of joyful capstone 
on their joyfulness in doing things, 
quite a number, led by Dr. J. m 



a small company of friends of the 
contracting parties and cordial 
good wishes were expressed for 
them by all. 



Will Move to Indiana. 



\V. L. Satchwill, of Locust Grove 
neighborhood, has been ready and 
anxious for several days to move 
Grant and his good wife, proceed- ' to his lS^acre Tarm purchased re- 
ed on New Year's night to give eently four miles back of Aurora, 



Will be a Busy Session if— 

Kentucky has the Legisalture on 
its hands again, and the session 
will be watched with great inter- 
est from 'every quarter of the 
State aa the leaders of the party 
in power have mapped out an 
elaborate program of reform in 
State affairs. If all the good 
legislative work that is promised 
la performed in the sixty days ses- 
sion the legislators will' of a nec- 
essity burn considerable midnight 
oil preparing their work. It is 
evident that the Legislature will 
do exactly what Governor Mor- 
row and the party leaders tut 
out for them and will have but 
few suggestions of their own to 
submit, which will be a display of 
wisdom on their part. 



A party p 
House one 




Up at th* Boon* 

ht the past w«*k 

a farm b« had 

of AurOra. Mfc- 

♦rain 






goods had frtne Of 
he «m (skins Ul% tsam and wag- 
on through, tt» had beeu o» tho 
road vighl dsya, * 



the preacher and his . family a 
good "pounding'' in order to keep 
up a good circulation during the 
stormy winter months. The many 
good things they left in the way 
ofr-eatables were greatly appreciat- 
ed and will be much enjoyed in 
the time to come. Blessings on 
this noble and generous people. 
B. F. SWINDLER, 

Pastor. 

New Schedule of Feis 

Following Is the schedule of min 
imum fees to be charged for ex- 
amination of titles to real estate 
in Boone County, Kentucky, ef- 
fective January 1st, 1920: 

The minimum charges are : 1 per 
cent on the first J2,000 or part 
thereof And add 25 cents for each 
0100 in excess of f 2,000; but no 
fee to be less than $7.50 except 
that $5.00 may be charged If the 
loan or sale be less than $500. 

Renewals and additional loans 
made within five years in the 
same name $7.50, but If under $500 
—$5.00. Writing deeds or mort- 

Jages for real estate minimum fee 
2.50. 

" w 

Automobile Quit aa Them 

Joseph Ilog.m, mother and sis- 
ter, Miss Lorrtta. of the Hebron 
neighborhood, got stranded on the 
Walton hill en IH* rTurrmgron ana 
BeUevWw pit* tet Friday night 
Their msrhlu* iffttsaO fa |mII th« 
kiU a»d tstf h« to send for re~< 

a v«ry uiiromrnrtaM* « t ( M «tlDit ■• 
• •tiff wiitd «!• blowing 4». I |k» 
wt»4 4ui y was traveUag 

the sere mark pretty raptu 



Indiana, but has been detained in 
Kentucky on account of the fer- 
ries not operating their large 
boats because of ice in the riven 
Herman Archie and Peter Smith 
will go with Mr. Satchwill to as- 
sist him operate his farm. 

Dr. E. W. Grant Dead. 

Dr. B. W. (Bd.) Grant died last 
Saturday at his home in Louis- 
ville, where^ he was a prominent 
physician and was at the head of 
the City Heatlh Department for 
several years, and was for the last 
two years Registrar of Vital Sta- 
tistics for Jefferson county. He 
was a son of the late Dr. Elijah 
L. Grant, of Belleview precinct, 
and a cousin of Dr. J. M. <«rant, 
of Petersburg, this county, where 
he has many other relatives. 

The trial of the colored man, 
Craig, who was lodged In juillu»t 
week, charged with shoving cold 
checks and forgery was continued 
until tomorrow. " In ths matter 
of cold checks the law g'ivea the 
party who Issues them io days In 
which tfc rslse the money with 
which to pay them, and some 
think Cralg may be able (..evade 
the cold cheek charge by raising 
enough money to Miusfy them. 

Ths report reachwd Krlauger 
last Sunday th«t two. large, 
trucks, kMtded With whlMi¥ tj 

,i way from L*>ui«vUI» ti», 
etniisll. would pass «i 
team Sunday night. a*«| it 
several ol the M>h>«» • susl 

laager iKHti i ma •» 

after lb the ref^H 

(key sHmi *»•«», uttu «kmt alfOj*/ 








■ 



mmemm 



Mfak^£>ii :-^j&Mk-m 



SM^^ititBSi^lBiSi^'^^il^M^SM^I^iMg^^ 



. ***Sa2.i., 



THURSDAY JAN. 8th, 1920 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDS* 



l **N 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦«! have about all they can handle, 
«. *■» ! ^nu quite- a lot of tobacco Bold 

» WALTON. ♦ : on other markets has boon 

» • j brought here for sale as it is. 

*>»*«*««>««**«ee«e***««**o« [the general opinion oi buyers, and 
Miss Katie Powers of Verona, ! sellers who know, that the Wal- 
epent Tuesday here win friends, ton 



Miss Jennie Noelf, of Covington, 
spent port of last week herewith 
f r lends - 

i Charles L Griffith has been quite 
ill the past week but is im- 
proving. 

Robert W. Allen of Landing, 
spent part of last week herewith 
his many friends. 

Michael DempBey, one of the 
best citizens of Verona neigh- 
borhood, spent Tuesday herewith 
frienda 

Judge, and Mrs. Chas. Strother 
have been enjoying a delightful 
visit to their daughter, Mrs, Chas. 
Holman and family. 

Mr and Mrs. Clifford Holburn 
of Louisville, spent *the first of 
the week here the guests of Mr 
and Mrs Edward Fuilifove. 

Mrs. Bruce Allen spent the past 
week at Leitchfield, Grayson-co., 
the guest of her former pastor, 
Kev. Oius Hamilton and wile. 

Prof. J. W- Dixon of New Cas- 
tle, Henry county, spent part of 
last week with Mr. and Mrs. 1. 
j. Davis on the farm near town, 

Cal Neumester, B E. McElroy 
and Bluch Rich, Jr, spent Friday 
in Louisville relative to the to- 
bacco there shipped from the Wal- 
ton warehouse 1 , 

Mr and Mrs. Harry Percivalland 
his sisters, Misses Anna, OUie anu 
Emm, oi Covington, spent Sunday 
here,, guest3 o* uieir cousin, R 
K btepnens and wiie. 

Rev and Mrs. J. D. Waters and 
children moved to Millcvsourg, O , 
the first of the weeK, whi'iv lie 
has been engaged as pastor of the 
Christian eiiureh lor the current 
year 

Mrs. Cynthia White was called 
to the bedside of her mother Mrs. 
Geo. L. Smith, near Big Bone 
Springs, last Saturday on account 
oi her serious illness with pneu- 
monia. 

Miss Janie Dickey who has been 
indisposed lor .some time 
much improved and is ontneroau 
to full recovery, but it will i>e 
some time beiore she will be abie 
to resume her school work. 

George T Ryan, of Cocington, 
was a visitor nere last week He 
recently returned from overseas, 



cents better than any other loose 
leu' market in Kentucky or Indi- 
ana. 

Walton Odd-Fellows lodge elect- 
ed and installed officers for the 
ensuing term as follows: Noble 
Grand, I. T. Grubbs; Vice Grand, 
N. D. Moore; Secretary D. B.Wal- 
lace; Treasurer, H. C Diers; Host, 
Wm. C. Mox..., r <R. S. Noble Grand 
J. G. Pennington; Left Supporter 
Noble Grand, A. H. Smith; R. S. 
Vice Grand, John Stamler, Left 
Supporter Vice Grand, A. S. Pen- 
nington; Conductor, Carl Neumeis 
ter; R. Scene Supporter, John H. 
Friend; L. S. 8., B. C. Moore; In- 
side Guardian, W. O. Richey; Out- 
side Guardian, R. D. Stamler, Fi- 
nance Committee, W. T, Dudgeon, 
John Allen; Wm. C. Moxley ; Wid- 
ows and Orphans Committee, N. 
T. Welsh, J. M. Bolington, A. H. 
Smith. 

The market at the Walton Loose 
Leaf Tobacco Warehouse last Sat 
urday was the best in average- 
price this season Nearly ninety 
thousand pounds were sold at an 
average of $34 00 per cwt. The 
banner sale was that of J D. 
Vanlandingham's crop, raised in 
Kenton county, in which there 
were several thousand pounds, 
averaging $71 69. The market was 
good on all grades because of the 
introduction of several new buy- 
ers from Louisville, and the pros 
pects of an active market and big 
prices are very encouraging, and 
the balance of this month r will 
be a fine time to get the best 
market of the season Get your 
tobacco ready before March 1st, 
for in all probability the selling 
season will be about over by 
that time 



♦ ♦ 

♦ BELLEVIEW. « 

♦ ♦ 



T W. Cook and family spent 
New Year's day with J Cook and 
is family near Waterloo 

Mrs Lena Buchner returned to 
her home in Newport, Monday, 
after several days' visit with rel- 
atives here 

Miss Laura Whitenack has re-< 
turned from Harrodsburg, where 



she spent the holiday vacation 
where he served Lncle Sam, ana j with relatives 
he is now back in the railroad j Ralph Cason and family, Mr and 
service as fireman on the C O. | Mrs Carlos Cason, Mr. and Mrs. 

J G. Smith and son and Miss 



Jno. L. Vest spent the first of 



the wees at Louisville attending Kathryne Maurer were the S 
to some oi his law practice aim | &**£? of „ Mr8 T1 ? e )l!_?f *?": 



Sunday 



also attending a meeting of the 
Chapter of Eastern Star, being 
the Associate Grand Worthy Pa- 
tron of Kentucky. A 

The trial of Beartley Craig,' 
charged with forgery, was con- 
tinued last week by County Judge 
Riddeil, and Craig was remanded 
to jail to await developments nee 
essary to properly dispose of the 
case until the grand jury meets. 

Walton Masonic Lodge elected 
and installed officers as follows: 
Worshipful Master, George J. 
Grubbs; Senior Warden, A. R. 
Johnson; Junior Warden, J. T, 
Hurt; Secretary, S. H. McCartt; 
Treasurer, Chas. W. Ransier; Ty- 
ler, Joseph Reed. 

Foreman H. Arthur of Mayslick, 
Mason county, spent part of the 
past week here with his sister, 
Mrs G. C. Rankins and family, 
and is arranging to move to the' 
Chas S. Bolee farm near Rich- 



Mrs W. W. Green and Mrs. 
Laura Botts entertained at dinner 
during the holidays, Mrs Belle 
Cason and daughter, Miss Anna; 
4-Mrs Carlos Cason and Miss Alma 
Lake 



v ed by his father C C. Arthur. nnt ,,_ th ~ nrpMlnf Kniiriincr r h« 




Mr. and Mrs. Chas. F. Dixon 
and children moved here last 
week from Greenville, Va , and 
have rented the McElroy resi- 
dence opposite the Phoenix Ho- 
tel Mr. Dixon and his brother 
n. the Phoenix Garage and will 
manage.it, succeeding A M. Ed- 
wards 

The Town Council recently elect 
ed organized Monday night at 



Large Rural Mails. 

The largest mail/in the history of 
the local rural routes was (hat han- 
dled by the carriers last Friday : 

R. D. 1 handled 770 pieces. 

R. D. 2 handled 710 pieces. 

R. I>. 3 handled 754 pieces. 

The rural mail has bten increasing 
in volume pretty rapidly for a year, 
and the carriers are wondering when 
the limit will be reached. 



M. L. Riddeil closed out his 
store at auction last Tuesday af- 
ternoon. Mr. Riddeil has not de- 
cided as to where he will locate. 
For at least seventy-five years *a 
mercantile business has been con 



put" up the present building the 
corner was the site of a one- 
story building in which Jno. Glenn 
and Joseph Hawes sold groceries. 
The corner already has a lone- 
some look, and it is hoped that 
it will not be long until some 
business is opened up there. 



It commenced raining and freez- 
ing Tuesday evening and by Wed 
nesday morning there was a pret 



the office of A Ralph Edwards, j ty good sleet on the ground and 
who is the town clerk, and the ] getting about was difficult. Some 



following organization Was per- 
fected; Chairman, 11 V Diers; 
Treasurer, J Cloyd Powers; tho 
other members W. B. Johnson, B. 
B. Allphin and J. M. Arnold were 
appointed on various committees 
Jno. L, Vest was elected Town 
Attorney, and A R. Edwarus. 
Town Clerk 

t 

Miss Corinne Tom tin entertain- 
ed a number of her young girl 
friends at the home oi her par- 
ents Mr. and Mrs. Sampson Tom- 
lin last Friday in a most elegant 
manner and a fine day was spent 
together. Music was a most pleas- 
ing feature and a nice luncheon 
waa enjoyed very much. The 
guests were Mi9ses Mabel John- 
son, Marie Vest, Margaret Ryan, 
Nellie Johnson, Anna Reffit and 
Gertrude Wills. 

Wilford R Rice of Walton, who 
has been employed in the office 
force of the Filth-Third Nation- 
al Bank, Cincinnati, has been elect 
ed cashier of the Deposit Bank 
at Hebron, Boone county, and 
will take charge as soon as the 
bank opens for business which 
will be in about a month Mr. 
Rice is a very fine young gen- 
tleman of ability and he wili 
make the bank an excellent cash- 
ier 

Walton Lodge Knights of Py- 
thias elected and installed offi- 
cers for the ensuing term aa fol- 
lows: Chancellor Commander, Sam 
uel H. McCartt; Vice Chancellor, 
G. B. Powers; Master At Arms, 
Wm. C. Moxley; Keeper oi Re- 
cords and Seal, Thomas F. Curley ; 
Matter Exchequer, D. B. Wallace; 
Prelate, W. D. Kennedy; Inside 
Guard, H. C. Diets; Outside Guard 
Blmer Breedwu , Deputy Grand 



John P. Duncanh as sold his poul 
try farm immediately east of town 
to Leonard Kite, consideration 
not given. It is not known 
wether "Mr. Kite expects to con- 
duct a poultry farm or not. 



Carroll Cropper's Ford runabout 
went off the Petersburg pike near 
one of the Woolper bridges last 
Tuesday night. The sleet was 
the cause of his trouble. He es- 
caped without injury. 

The rural carriers left town 
Wednesday morning with their 
hearts full of misgivings as to 
what would happen them beforo 
they got back 



The Walton eorr«4S|x>mk'nt re- 
Blmer Breed eu , Deputy Uihimi po/ta the Farmers tobacco house 
Chancellor, Carl Neumt'istorj Rep J at Wilton, us having a big sale 

1 l. is! Monday Head wind he says 



resentatlve Oraud Lodge, 
Wallaoe. 

The Farmers Loose Leal Tob»o 
c© Warehouse had a great *al.< 
Maott; with a fine floor of &m 



average <>i r > ■ ■ ■ 



asidhave stag prospect fui the 



Helta 



Theceaay 
of ttaf k. 



and Honda v. 
Ickt Kami*. * 



Mrs Helen Gessert, of (iruml 
Junction. Colorado, Is the guest 
of Mrs Kmms Brown 

WidiMaday wm* u foggy day, 
the it-mil! of the softening up 

llf 111"' tiMllpt'l tftll- 



of the trucks that make daily 
trips . to tho. rjty- had to give up-, 
going Wednesday morning as they 
coula not be kept on the road. 

Hubert Rouse, mail carrier be- 
tween Burlington and Covington, 
came as far as Florence with his 
truck Wednesday morning by 
which time he had had enough 
excitement trying to keep his ma 
chine on the pike, when he call- 
ed a mule and a buggy to bring 
the mail on to Burlington 

Remember that the sale of Wal- 
ter Florence advertised for the 
10th inst, has been called off. 
This sale was to have taken 
place on the farm recently pur- 
chased by Mr Florence from Jno. 
Conrad, on the Burlington and 
Florence pike near the Hopeful 
church * 



PUBLIC 




Horses. Mules. Sheep. Hogs. 

Farm Implements. 

• # 

I will sell at public sale at my residence on the Union and 
i_ Beaver road, two and one-half miles from } 

Union, Boone County, Ky., ' 

Beginning at 10 o'clock a. m., on 

FRIDAY, JM. 16, 

THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY. 




Horses and Mules. 

Pair of Mules 7 and 8 years old, 16 1-2 hands 
high and good ones ; pair of unbroken 3-year 
old Mules ; pair of aged horse Mules, as good as 
ever looked thru a cqllar ; 12-year old family 
Mare ; 3-year old Filly. 

Sheep and Hogs. 

2 Poland China Sows and 12 Pigs; 49 registered 
and purebred Hampshire Ewes, bred to the best 
Ram imported from England last year, at a cost 
of $500 ; 9 registered yearling Hampshire Rams ; 
2 registered 2-year old Hampshire Rams; 40 
grade Ewes bred to above Rams. 

SOME HOUSEHOLD AND 

Manure Spreader, two or three Log Chains, 
Sheep Clipping Machine. 



Farming Implements. 

2 good Road Wagons, 1 old Road Wagon, 2 Hay 
Beds, Rock Bed, Mowing Machine, Hay-rake, 
2 Oliver Cultivators, 3 Oliver E breaking Plows, 
Hillside Plow, Jumping Plow, single and double 
Shovel Plows, 2 5-tooth Harrows, pulverizing 
Roller, Corn Drills — 1 and 2 row, Forks, Picks, 
Shovels, etc., good 2-horse Sled, Hinge Harrow, 
Iron Harrow, Disc Harrow, several new Gates, 
Fencing, 2 Wheelbarrows, 2 Lawn Mowers, 
Tools, etc., lot of Corn, Hay, etc., 3 Corn Shel- 
ters, Hog Scalding-box, Kettle, etc., Phaeton, sin- 
gle and double Buggy Harness, Bridle, Saddle, 4 
sets Work Harness, several Collars good as new. 

KITCHEN FURNITURE, 

Several Tarpaulins, Horse Covers and Blankets, 
and a lot of Tobacco Sticks. 



TERMS OIF SALE. 

On sums of $10 and under, cash ; on sums over $10 a credit of nine months 
without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved security, negotiable 
and payable in Union Deposit Bank, Union, Ky., before removing property. 



LUNCH FREE 

GEO. BURKITT, Auctioneer. 



C. W. Lassing. 



PUBLIC SALE. 



I will soil at my residence 1-8 of a 
mile from Hopeful church, Boone 
county, Ky., beginning at 12 o'clock 
noon, on 

Saturday, January 17th, 1920 

the following; property: 

1 good work and driving Horse 
1 yearling Heifer 
1 spring Wagon 
1 Vulcan Chilled Plow 
1 "A" Harrow 
1 Hayrake 
1 Mowing Machine 
Some Meat and Lard 
Household and Kitchen Furniture. 
Terras— 8ums of $5 (X) and under, 
cash ; on sums over $5.00 a credit of 
six months without interest, purch- 
aser to give note with good security 
payable in Peoples Deposit Bank, 
Burlington, Ky. 

C. E. TANNER. 
Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. 

FARMS JOR SALE. 

We have some good farms for sale 
In Boone county, Ky., and Dear- 
born county, Indiana, adjacent to 
l.awrenceburg. 

II. K. FISHER, 
It l.awrenceburg, I nil. 



Quite a number of aubacribrrfi 
have renewed their subscriptions 
since the beginning of the new 
year while several new numes 
have been added to thai Recor- 
der's subscription list. 



January does not seem tacUosd 
te change the weather program 
hat or December 



FRANCBSVILLB. 



♦ 



School opened here again Mon- 
day after a week's vacation. 

Little Manllus Raymond Good- 
ridge ia recovering from mumps. 

Mrs. Nellie Markland who has 
been quite ill does not improve. 

Jack . Pierce, of Delhi, waa the 
guest of John Cave, Jr., last Fri- 
day. 

Miss Florence Bggleston spent 
last week with relatives in Addy- 
ston, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Bggleston ama 
children visited at Wm. Houze's, 
in Ludlow, one day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Ogden and 
children spent New Year's day 
with Leon Aylor and wife, of He- 
bron. 

Otto Muntz has returned to his 
home near Belleview after a visit 
of several days with relatives and 
friends here. 

Mrs, Will Reitmann had as her 

guests last week Mr. and Mrs. Carl 
unsicker and daughter, Loraine, 
Sue, of Cincinnati. 

Mioses Klnora and Mary Eggles- 
ton spent the week-and with their 
friends Misses Bewie und Alma 
Munts, near BeUevleW. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Scot horn hs<4 
as guests last Thursday Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W Grant, C 8 Riddeil 
and wire and Mr. and Mrt H W, 
Maker and little son Ronald Lee. 

Covlngton-IOtJM pounds of to- 

o sold Monday at «n average 

of m.U. Oood and Uncy leaf 

was from ft (of «#•*• W *«P" 

par lesi an trf cofcry grades 

sold as high U&M * P°»» oa - 



SATISFACTION 

It is worth a great deal to you to have a feeling 
of perfect satisfaction about the manner in which 
your financial business is handled- 

Let us take care of your business and you be 
the judge as to whether or not it is properly 
handled. 

Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

Capital $30,000. 
Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) $50,000 

We have a few more Farmers Account Books 

for distribution among our patrons. 

CALL FOR ONE. 




Wanted Wiry Cow*. 

A dairy oommuulty la being started 
In Pulaski oounty. They waql one 
or two oar loads of bfs^-olassjpows. 
Lot tas know If you havs m, "" 
for sals. Tbls means good producers 

and not on 111 

W. D. BUTTON, Co. Aft** 

o]tnf 



WANTED. 



Men to raise tobacco on new 
grourd and work by the day when 
not In thu crop, 

W. A. OAINEB * 
sfsM 
R. D. 1. 



I NEB * HON 
llurllngton, Ky 



.' 






aWsnfflH HBBi 



■ni-inwm Hm 



BOONB COUNTY RBCORDBR 



* 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

ltev. Gko. A. Ruvkh, Pastor. 
JANUARY 11th, 1920, 

Hopeful— 

H):ilO a. m. Divine Worship, with 
Sermon by the P»Htor, and the Holy 
Communion. Ffferiiig for benevo- 
lence. 

Kht'iiHZflr 2 p. in. PorvlccH and ser- 
mon by Pastor. 

All heartily welcomed to the'e 
service*. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D., Pa.tor. 

Pr«iu'hiner every Bnnday morniiiK 

mid *■ veiling. 
Bible School evory Sunday at 10 h. 

m.— Sam Allen, Superintendent.. 
8kj \ cnrdiHl invitation is extended 
to all our 8er''ie<'«. 



THURSDAYJAW. 8th, 19*» 



The river was full of ice Mon- 
day morning. 

A very small crowd attended 
court last Monday. 

The shovel and the "ho ho'' are 
what deliver the goo<«s. 



Do you remember that there 
was no zero weather last winter? 

Rural route carriers have been 
having hard weather the past 
few days. 

R. - S. Crislei- has shingles and 
has been confined to his house 
for several days. 

People who have ice houses have 
been given a fine opportunity to 
fill them with a very fine qual- 
ity* of ice. 

Quite a number of the persons 
in town last Monday called in and 
had their subscriptions moved up 
a notch. Thanks. 



The census enumerators are now 
abroad in the land. They haa 
pretty rough weather in which to 
begin their work. 



Hear that Elmo Gaines will not 
lose his clerkship in the Stato 
Auditor's office at Frankfort for 
some time if at aH. 



While the heating plant in the 
local High School building is out 
of commission, the school is be- 
ing held in the court house. 

The first day of the new year 
was very bright but a cold wind 
from the west made it very un- 
fortable to be out of doors. 

Before buying whisky from a 
bootlegger it is well enough to 
makejiim prove the quality of his 
goods by taking a drink of it. 

D. 9. Wallace, President of the 
Equitable Bank & Trust Co., Wal- 
ton, Was a business visitor .too 
Burlington one day the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T, Stephensom, 
ot Limaburg neighborhood, enter- 
tained the young people with a 
delightful party one nigh', during 
the holiday period. 

, John P. Duncan, who was bad- 
ly hurt several days ago by- be- 
ing thrown out of hia cart while 
driving n young horse, has about 
recovered from his injuries. 



Thirty thousand barrels of Ken- 
tucky whisky arrived in Philadel- 
phia from Louisvillo on Christmas 
day and yet not a "drap'' could 
the Fillies get to use in the hol- 
iday celebration.* 

It has been said that life Is a 
battle in which the battle-field ia 
Just north of the ears. The ques- 
tion is this: Is your share of 
it full of heavy artillery or is it 
just "No Man's Land." 



1 



A cow that had to stand out by 
the side of the barn and shiver 
such nights as some or those the 
past week was not in much of a 
condition to give a large flow of 
milk the next morning. 

Col. W. J. Bryan has appeared 
on the political horizon as a can- 
didate for the Democratic nomin- 
ation for the Presidency again. 
Who knows but what the Colonel 
may landt he nomination? 
t ^^' — ■ 

Claude E. ^llen, son of Levi Al- 
ien, pf Brookville, Ind., but for- 
merly of this county, writes the 
Recorder of his big holiday strike, 
the capturing of nine fine skunks 
in one den, for which he receiv- 
ed ntjb. ^^^^^ 

A few years ago it was thought 
an automobile could not be oper- 
ated when the temperature was 
inf the neighborhood of aero, but 
that notion no longer prevails and 
they are kept in us* until it gets 
too cold for the driver to be 
out, but occasionally a machine 
becomes so badly chilled that it 
quits. . 

Parties entered the school house 
during the holidays, put water in 
the large boiler and then fired 
the furnace, leaving Ihe system 
with water In it which froze, 
burstrd several sections in rad- 
iators in the building, putting the 
entire system out of eommiasion 
and causing several clays' unex- 
pected dealy In resumption of 
•chool following the vacation. 

The flscil court was In MS* Ion 
Tuesday closing up the MHMty'l 
buHUKrti for the |eist yen . and 
taking a peep into the fu'uro jti 
far as H #«»ul'l. 

Besides the settlement «>r tin* 
ah»rtfl whirl* « ii filed by •' M 

.*U»g, camndflsloii«»« it|.|Mitnt- 
«m! to miiks the settldmt-ut. * **!« 
..( • 16,000 In i > is *m cr- 

ib 



Personal Mention 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C Hughes en- 
tertained with a turkey dinner 
last Sunday. . 

Col. John Baldon spent several 
days the past week in Indiana- 
polis, Indiana. 

Mrs - William Hedges spent the 
latter part of last week with rel- 
atives in the city 

Mr and Mrs. Rimer Kelly enter- 
tained a number of their relatives 
at dinner New Year's day. 

Miss ^Ruitrt A.en^ spent her hol- 
iday vacation with her sister, Mrs. 
Dean Stanley, at Lebanon, Ohio. 

Denzel Carpenter, of the Locust 
Grove neighborhood, has been 
'very ill following an attack of 
measles. 

W. L. Kirkpatrick entertained 
quite a number of relatives and 
friends with a turkey dinner last 
Sunday. 

County Atty. Benj. Riley spent 
last Sunday with his lady friend, 
Miss Jessie Cleek, of the Union 
neighborhood. 

William Finn afterOspendin? the 
holidays at home returned, Mon- 
day, to Lexington, where he is 
attending college 

Mrs. Elizabeth MOller, of Big 
Bone, was the guest of her sis- 
ter, Mrs. B. B. Hume, a — few- 
days the past week. 

Supt. Gordon returned last Sat- 
urday from Lexington where he 
spent a portion of the holidays 
with his daughter, Miss Mary. 

Mr and Mrs. Richard Perm re- 
turned home Monday after a vis- 
it of several days with relatives 
in Scott and Harrison counties 

Prof, and Mrs. Caywood return- 
ed the latter part of last week 
from a delightful visit with rela- 
tives and friends in Mason county. 

Judge Gaines spent several days 
last week in Louisville, attending 
the State Convention of Circuit 
Judges and Commonwealth's Attor 
neys. 

Mrs. Joseph Huey and her hus- 
band's grandmother, MrB. Crouch, 
all of Union neighborhood, expect 
to leave for Florida about the 
13th inst. 

County Farm Agent W. D. Sut- 
ton and wife spent the holidays in 
a most delightful manner with 
their relatives in the Southern 
part of tho State. 

M. L. Riddell and wife and his 
sister, Mrs. Chester Utz, of He- 
bron , neighborhood, were guests 
of his brother, W. T. Kiddell ann 
wife, of Dayton, Ohio, from last 
Saturday until Monday. 

B. F. Crisler, of McVilel, one of 
the Recorder's veteran subscribers, 
made the office a brief call one. 
day last week. Although leading 
the life of a. retired farmer he 
has no time to lose and was in 
his usual haste to get back home 
"to see to things.'" 

Miss Nell Martin entertained one 
evening last week with a "Chaf- 
fing-dish' 1 party Among those 
present were A B. Renaker and 
wife, M G. Martin and Wife, E. 
C Arnold and wife, Judge Sidney 
Gaines, Miss Sheba Roberts and 
County Attorney B H. Riley. 

W. A. Gaines left Tuesday to 
visit his son, Lieut. B. W. Gaines 
on Paris Island, S. C. Owing to 
scarcity of surgeons Lieut. Gaines 
has been unable to secure a dis- 
charge from the service. After 
spending some time with his son 
Mr. Gaines will go to Florida 
where he will spend the remainder 
of the winter. 



Good Sale of Hogs. 

John Binder, of near Hamilton, 
shipped 36 eight-month old hogs 
to the Cincinnati market, one day 
last week, that averaged 180 lbs. 
to the hog— 6180 pounds. These 
hogs sold for $14.50 per hundred, 
bringing $939.60. After deducting 
yardage and commission netted 
Mr. Binder $904.27. These hogs 
were fed on corn that had been 
damaged by high water. 



Women 
Made Young 

Bright eyes, a clear skin and a body 
full of youth and health may be 
yours if you will keep your system 
in order by regularly taking 



COLD MEDAL 




HMtmim 



TlM world's Standard remedy for kidney, 
liver, bladder and uric acid troubles, the 
enemies of Hie and looks. In use since 
1606. All druggists, three sizes. 
Leak far the nam* Gold M*<UI on every bos 
•ad accept no imitation 



FARM BUREAU CAMPAIGN. 

Those in charge of the Boone 
County Farm Bureau have received 
word itiiit Mesxrs. Morgan Hughes 
and Geoffrey Morgan can bo with us 
for the week beginning Monday, 
January Ittth. During that week 
meetings will be held in every i re- 
crnct in the county to acquaint the 
fanners in every corner of the coun- 
ty with the functions of tlif Farm 
Bureau. 

Those faun ra soliciting members 
already hsve around 200 in the or- 
ganization. Immediately following. 
this week's campaign, u two days' 
membership drive will be put on. 

Monday the 26. h and Tuesday the 
27th have been set snide for the 
membership drive. You will have 
an opportunity to join the Farm Bu 
reau before the close of this drive. 
By Tueadsy night, January 27th. it 
is expected there will be 800 active 
members in the Farm Bureau. 

Watch next week** paper lor the 
Hpeakiug dates in your neighborhood 
, « W. i). SUTTON. 
County Farm Agent, Henna Co. 



♦ ♦ 
S UNION. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
*♦•♦♦«*♦♦•♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦•*♦♦♦«>• 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Barlow had hk 
their guest.«, Sunday, Leslie Barlow 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Perry l T tz 
and Hon, Mr. and Mrs. Jolm Tavlor 
and Miss Kathryne. Mr. and Sirs. 
Ezra Blankenbeker and Alma.. and 
Mis* Jesuits Utz. 

Mrs. J. $. Garrison is visiting her 
sister, Mrs. Wallace Garrison in 
Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. I). W. Newman en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. J. B.I onrad 
and sons, Ross and John, at dinner, 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Feldhaus entertained 
Rev. and Mrs. Potts, Saturday night. 

Mrs. Woodry has returned home 
from Carlsbad Springs very much 
improved in health. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Herndon, jr., 
are living at their home recently 
purchased from J. A. Huey. 

Mrs. Chas. Hedges entertained 
Miss Louise Feldhaus and Raymond 
Newman at dinner New Years. 

Sterling Woods was the week end 
guest of his cousin, Raymond New- 
man, of Woodview Farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Bristow had as 
their guest, last Thursday. Mr. and 
Mrs. J. C. Bristow and daughters, 
Nairn and Ann. 

Miss Eugene Riley spent the lat- 
ter part of the week in Cincinnati 
with friends. 

The many friends of Martin Wea- 
ver, are sorry to he ir of his death a t 
S'wldy, Teun. 

Percy Dugan, of Warsaw, has pur- 
chased Mr. Huey's bungalow and 
will take possession March first. 

Rev. S. T. Hill has goue to Tennes- 
see for a month's vacation. 

Miss Jessie Cleek returi ed to He- 
bron, Monday, to resume her school 
work. 

Mrs. Joseph Huey and children, 
and Mrs. Nannie Crouch will soon 
leave for Florida to spend the win- 
ter. 

Mrs. John Criswell entertained the 
W. M. U. Frldav afternoon. 

Mr. Townsei d spent several days, 
last week, on tne tobacco market at 
Cynthiana. 

Mrs. Sara Burkett entertained Dr. 
Hanley and sous, last week. 

Dr. and Mrs. M.J. Crouch lift, last 
week for Jacksonville, Fla., where 
they will spend the winter 

Mr. and Mrs. James Huey have 
moved to their home at Erlanger. 

Reuben Conner has resigned as as- 
sistant cashier at the Union Bank 
and has accepted a position In a 
bank at Erlanger. 

Miss Norma Rachal left, Monday, 
to resume her studies at State Uni- 
versity, Lexington. 



BULLITTSVILLE. 



Nearly all tho ice houses are filled 
with a very fine quality of ice. 

This neighborhood was real lively 
for several days in honor of Mrs. 
Stephens, of Ash la ml. Kans. ; Dr. 
Raymond Cropper, of Columbus, 
Ga. ; and Earl Cropper, who were 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Crop- 
per during the holidays. .Saturday. 
Mrs. Cropper entertained I S or 15 
of her friends with a handsome tur- 
key dinner. Sunday the crowd was 
entertained by Mr. and Mrs. C E. 
Stephens. Then we had a day's ret-t 
and went to Mrs. Anna Gaines and 
son, Milton's, to another fine dinner. 
Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Milton 
Souther entertained the crowd at 
their Hill Top home. Thursday a 
theater party composed of Miss Lou 
Stephens, Mrs. Hubert Cropper, Mrs. 
Ida Balsly. Mrs. Annie Gaines and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Kreylich and 
daughter. Miss Mattie, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jas. T. Gaines went, to Cincinnati 
and remained over until Saturday, 
sight seeing. 

Miss Edna Riley and brother, Mil- 
ton, and Hebert Crisler, of Coving- 
ton, were visiting Mrs. Ida Balsly 
the latter part of last week. 



HUMS. 



Will Smith Jias la gripe. 

Arch Noell entertained. Sunday. 
Mr. and Mrs. liiiese!! Sparks. Mrs 
W. M. Smith aid boii, Oral Mi-s No 
in llotfuiau and Miss Leii>t ( llukci. 

Mrs. (leu. W. Baker visited her 
parents recently. 

Henry Norman and Wlfssr* guests 
of In r mother. Mrs Lua Milhi 

Hi iiIm ii Noell In Muk . 

Robert and Alheil Finindl will 
give a 1**11 si Hlg Hone, Saturday 
night, January In The h«#l of J*«* 

tiiuale will be luiuUlied Iw.-ryone 
la li.v I 

- sick 
er.v • i'l >• waa «U-u 

by Jamea Hello id a.) night 



Resolutions of Respect. 

In'inemory of our Brother Win M. 

Lancaster, who died Dec. 25, 1011). 

Whereas. It has pleased Almighty 
God in His wisdom to remove from 
our midst our beloved brother, Win. 
M. Lancaster by death. 

Therefore, be it resolved that by 
his death Lodge has lost a faithful 
and consistent member of I he Order, 
a generous and kind neighbor. 

Resolved, That this Lodge extend 
its sy in|iathies to his beloved wife 
mid children in their sore bereave- 
ment, ^-^, 

Resolved, That a copy of the a 
resolutions be Me lit to his v. lie, also 
a copy be seid to the Boone County 
Recorder for publication, 

Resolved, That, tlms* r> solutions 
l> ' # *piear. upon the ReCrvrda ot the 
Lodge and ilutt the members o! the 
Lodge wear the usual badge of 
mom ling for 110 days. 

l) H. Brown, 

I O, Rouse, 
H. It. Tanm I 
Veiiua l.odg.. So 11 1.0.0 

Flwrete 



Com. 



I 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GEEATEST STORE. 




Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



Tremendous Sale 

Of Coats 

Formerly Priced up to $59.75 ~~ 

$2975 ~ 



Every Coat With a Big Fur Collar. 

One hundred fine coats from our regular stock of higher priced coats 
are included in the wonderful selection of coats in this sale. Beautiful 
fabrics, luxurious fur collars, and the most fashionable colors of the sea- 
son. You save ONE-HALF on the coat you buy in this sale. 






Sensational Savings Offered in our 

January 
Clearance Sale 

Beautiful Silks, Wool Dress Goods and Coatings, Wash Materials, 
Linens, Towels, White Goods, Winter Underwear, Hosiery, Men's 
Furnishings of all descriptions, Millinery, Fine Undermuslins, Blouses, 
Blankets and beautiful Drapery Materials at prices that are DRASTI- 
CALLY REDUCED FROM REGULAR PRICE. 



Public Sale! 



Live Stock, Farm Implements, Eta 

We will sell at public auction at our farm one 
mile from Burlington, Ky ., on the Burlington 
and East Bend Road, on 



Thursday Jan. 8,1920 

The following property: 
2 work Horses, driving mare, work Mare, Colt coming 3 years old, Colt coming 2 years 
old, 2 Mules coming 2 years old, 6 milk Cows, 2 Heifers that will be fresh soon, 1 Heifer 
one year old, O. I. C. Registered Boar 18 months old, 9 months old Regtstered Duroc 
Boar, 14 fat Shoats that will weigh 125 pounds, 17 fat Shoats that will weigh 60 pounds, 
Sow and 7 Pigs, 2 Brood Sows. Farm Wagon, Road Wagon, Hay Bed, 2 sets Harness, 
Saddle, 4 Bridlds, 20 Cow Chains, Logchain, Buggy Harness, closed Carriage, Disc Har- 
Iroh Churn, Deering Mower, 2 Oliver Chill Plows, Jumper Plow, crosscut Saw, 3 Scythes, 
Doubletrees, Singletrees, 2 step Ladders, 16-foot Ladder, International Separator, 2 8-gal- 
lon Milk Cans, Whitewash Sprayer, Set of Furniture, 2 Wardrobes, Cook Stove, Heating 
Stove, Coal Oil Stove, Forks, Hoes, Shovels, Hay, Fodder, Corn, 2250 Hickory tobacco 
Sticks and many other articles. 



.This l» Ml J HP » BOH** tl«>, tM 

,U> upon which DetnocriU *•» 

together and I* >htl 
eul eam|>atift»» 



TERMS OIF 1 SALE. 

All sums of $10 and under, cash; on all sums over $10 a 
credit of nine months without interest will be given, pur- 
chasers to give notes with approved security payable at the 
Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. 

HANNA & ROBERTSON. 

J. M. EDDINS, Auctioneer. Sale to begin at 10 a. m. 

Lunch Will Be Served. 



m 




%M&^XmS8£ " BW=^ 



TBtJRSt>AY JAN. 8th, 1920 



3UONE COUNTY RftCQRDER 





f 



DIFFERENT BREEDS OF GEESE 



L£SS HOG-CHOLERA LOSSES 



In 



1918 Death Rate of Swine From 
Disease Was Placed at 42.1 
Per Thousand. 



(Prepared i.y tiio United states Depart- 
ment «f Agrlcu :p.) 

Sincr- 1013, when the United Stntes 
nVp n r t m enl «>f agriculture began work 
lo control lioj: iliolorn, Ihe dreaded dis- 
ease has brcoYlie less and less <i<?st.cue? j nnd 
tivc each year. A force averaging 1G5 
federal peterlnarfans has been main- 
tained, working in PtNmeratlon with 
state authorities in charge of quaran- 
tine ai.'l 
necessary For the >\wvv<- 

work. Daring the fb ■:ii yea 

than .->,■"< h,( «ift bogs were 
with hofj-ckofem serum, 
than 2 



Toulouse, Embden, Chinese rnd Afri. 
can Are Easily the Most Popu- 
lar in This Country. 

(Prepared by the Vnileil States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 
Six breeds of Reese have hcen ad- 
mit ted to the American standard of 
perfection, nainefy: Toulouse, Emb- 
den, Chinese, African, Wild or Cana- 
dian, and Egyptian. In addition to 
the standard breeds there is the so- 
called slongtt 1 goose, yvhich is a hy- 
brid made by crossing one of these 
varieties or the common goose with 
wild geese. Crosses of the varieties 
of geese, especiaHy of the Toul o use 
Knjhden. are ocr.usintutUf' uu'U-. 



without any apparent j;t:in. The 




iiiiiiiiiiiiii ii'iiiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin i 







Mirt It.UfI in 



There Is No Profit in Unhealthy Hogs 
— Animals Kept Under Clean Condi- 
tions, as on Good Pasture, Are Bet- 
ter Able to Resist Cholera and Other 
Diseases. 

with cholera, were cleaned and disin- 
fected under supervision of the depart- 
ment veterinarians. 

Altogether, representatives of the 
department visited more than 15,000 
farms to investigate reported out- 
breaks, to apply preventive measures 
and to clean and disinfect premises. 
How great a mennce hog cholera has 
been to the nation's swine industry : 
may be judged from the accepted esti- 
mate that fRt per cent of hogs lost from I 
all ailments die from cholera. In 1918 j 
the death rate of swine from disease ' 
waV placed at 42.1 per 1,000. Thus the ! 
loss was slightly above 4 per cent for i 
the United States, the lowest on rec- | 
ord, according to the department'* fig- 
ures. 



Toulouse. Emhden. Chinese, and Afri- 
can are easily the most popular breed! 
of freese in this country, the first twr 
greatly leading the other breeds. All 



;ept pri 
if flesh 
eir egu? 
ary pur- 



HOG RAISING IN THE SOUTH 



Many Southern Farmers Growing 

More Animals and of Larger Type 

— Noticeable In Georgia. 



economic breeds of geese are 
marily for the production 
and feathers, and aituongl) I 
are occasionally used for cull 
poses on the farm there is nc demand 
for them for food purposes in ihe mar- 
kets. 

The Toulouse, the largest of the 
standard breeds of geese, is a good 
layer, producing from 20 to .55 egg* 
a year, is docile, grows rapi-.'y. and 
makes a good market bird, however, 
its darJ*tpinfeathers make it a slightly 
li ss attractive market goose t'nan tht 
Embden* 

The Emhden, a large, white goose. 
slightly smaller and wirh somewhat 
longer legs than the Toulouse. Is only 
a fair layer and Is usually less pro- 
lific than the Toulouse. This .breed 
has white plnfeathers. Is a rapid grow- 
er, and matures early. 

The African, a gray goose with a 

distinct brown shade, about the size 

of the Emhden. is n good layer and 

makes a good market goose, although 

: It has Ihe objectionable dork pln- 

I feathers. It Is a rapid grower and 

j matures early. 

There are two standard varieties oi 
Chinese geese, the brown and tht 




& 



«W* 




(Prepared by the United State. Depart- I "^ ^\ varieties mature earl, 

mpnt of Agriculture.) ! an " nre 8n '" to be proline layers and 

An Important result of bog-cholera '"P" 1 powers, hut shy and rather dlffl- 

control work which has resulted In a ' <,,,f ,0 handle. 



steady decline of the disease, has . 
been the stimulus given the develop- I 
ment of swine raising in the South. I 
With other activities of the depart- j 
ment in this line, the assurance given 
to Southern farmers that hogs can be 
produeed without fear of losses from \ 
cholera has encouraged growing not 
only larger numbers of animals but 
also belter types., This ha* been no- [ 
tlcenble particularly In Oeorgin. A | 
few years ago that state purchased , 
about 40,000,000 pounds of pork more ' 
than it produced annually. But ef- j 
forts for the control of hog cholera '■ 
have gradually extended over the en- • 
tire state, with resulting confidence In ; 
hog raising. By 1918 Georgia was 
producing pork enough to make ship- 
ments to outside points besides sup- 
plying a large number of hogs to local ' 
slaughtering establishments. Similar ! 
progress has been made In Misslssip- ] 
pi, Alabama and Florida. 



The wild goose Is bred to some ex- 
tent in captivity, and the young are 
sold to hunters to use as decoys. Thf 
wild gamier is used to cross with 
either the common or the purebred 
goose, producing the so-called Mongrel 
ROOse. This Mongrel goose is highly 
prized as a market crnose, but is sterile 
and cannot be bred. 

The Egyptian goose Is a small, 
brightly-colored troose kept for orna- 
mental purposes, and rarely seen In 
this country. It resembles the -wild 
goose in shape and weighs two pounds- 
less in each class. 



yiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

I LIVE STOCK NOTES I 



nwiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimmmiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiifT 

There should be more calves on 
farms. 

• * # 

A satisfied, cow is probably a satis- 
factory cow. 

• * • 

More cows should be kept on the 
average farm. 

• • • 

Cows without salt lose flesh and 
finally breuk down. 

• • • 

Comfort is as essential to a cow as 
to any other worker. 

• • • 

When buying a grade cow It puys 
te select one from a pure-bred bull. 

• * * 

A number of calves die every year 
on account of the disease known as 
scours. 

• • • 

In stormy weather, when mud || too 

Srequent, the cows will take u K reat 
sal of scrubbing. 

• • • 

One hundred ton* of Milage will 
ftatf V cows 40 pounds of Milage a 
ay for 900 days. 

• • • 

. Any man who keeps ten head or 
mar* cattle will And a Jflo an eco- 
nooste esjfjlnenent en his farm. 



PoultpyNotes 

TJo not overcrowd the houses, brood 
coops, brooder or colony coops. 

* * * 

Everything must be kept clean In 
warm weather to keep vermin down. 

« • ♦ 

Turkey hens usually lay a : >out fif- 
teen eggs before beginning to get 
broody. 

* "* * 

Poultry can endure warm weather 
just as well as they can freezing 
weather. 

• * * 

In rainy cold weather young chicks 
should be kept where it Is dry and 
warm. 

• • * 

Put the brooder for early little chicks 
in a dry. sunny clean place where' there 
art no lice oj* mites. * 

♦ * • 

It doesn't nay to try to rear the very 
early ehiekf. in out-door brooders un- 
less those b'ooders are under a shed. 

• • • 

Soft-shellei eggs are often caused 
ft? Ihe fowls being confined, hecomlng 
overfnt, and from lack of mineral mat- 
tor. 

» • * 

He Hure that the windows In the 
south side of the poultry house are 
wide o|M»n on all bright, sunny days to 
let in the health-giving pure air. 
» • « 

With the advent of warm spring 
weather, nee and mites nre apt to be 
on the Increase. Itobust laying beiiM 
If! u< nciallv under the care of people 
ujm .(,. ■•;> • • .-. <« ,ijj V presence of 
vermin. 



Fine Metals Have , 
Given Maxwell its Rank 



iHE very substance of which a car is made 
denotes its quality; and the use of rine and 
strong metals in the Maxwell has won it 
many, many friends. 

It was necessary to make the Maxwell chassis 
of the very best materials. For its great mission 
was to transport — /;/ an extremely economical way — 
as jjreat a passenger load over the same road and at 
the same speed as the larger and heavier cars. 

Thus it was obviou,s that the Maxwell had to be 
light. And to make it light the quality metals 
were used. , 

Metallurgists, the men who have made tlie 
study of metals a science, say that it compares 
favorably pound for pound with the highest priced, 
cars the world has produced. 

But you need not be a metallurgist to discover 
this "inner goodness" in a Maxwell. Three months 
will tell; six months will tell you more. 

Otherwise Maxwell in five short years would 
never have grown from a production of 5,000 i 
year to 100,000 a year. 

300,000 Maxwells on the highways of the world 
today answer most any question you can ask about 
this great car. Price, $985 f. o. b. Detroit. 



W. L. KIRKPATRICK 

Agent for Boone County 

Btirlingtonv Ky. - 



F. V. Kassebun & Sim, 

ttAJUTE 4 MARBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large 8to«h on Display J 
to detect from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

US Main Strest, 

AURORA, IND. 

i 




ic 



i 

19 E. Seventh St, 
• COVINGTON, KY. 

CLYDE BAklOW, 



I Sales and Service 



! 



General Manager. 






m 



D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORWE Y AT LAW, 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger. - Kentucky. 

WANTED 

Boone County farms to sell. Ad- 
dress W. E. VEST. 
First Nat. Bank Building, 

Covington, Ky 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Building 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 

White Oak Stock Farm 



1 




now has on hand April farrowed Rigs 
both sexes; will be ready for ship- 
ment when 8 to 10 weeks old. These 
are the Big Bone and smooth type, 
the kind that makes the show hog. 
Prices Seasonable— Pedigrees Free. 

FRANK HAMMOND, 
R. D. 1, Florence, Kv. 

Con. Phone 229. ma8tf 



Out in the State. 

Cynthiana.- Thieves who borea 
a hole through the floor -of a 
freight car syphoned off tho con- 
tents of one barrel in a shipment 
of whiBky to Mexico. 

Frankfort— Dog taxes will pro- 
vide $85,000 for county schools and 
an evidence of canine- regenera- 
tion is - found in a decrease of $34,- 
000 in sheep claims. 

Richmond— Miss, Bettie F. Story, 
13 years old, married to Brack 
Applegate, 22 years old, is the 
youngest bride of local record. 

Danville— A thief who visited 
the apiary of David McGinnis se- 
cured only a small amount of 
honey, but destroyed seven hives. 

Winchester — Captain Lindsay 
Johns, who was reported to have 
died in Siberia, has written his 
parents he will return home in 
May. 

Vanoeburg— A hog butchered by 
J. B. Rackworth dressed 785 lbs., 
and hams weighed 80 pounds each. 

Maysville— The motor car of B. 
L. Roberts bolted into the en- 
trance of St. Patrick's church and 
tore away the railway of the stair 
way. 

London — Dynamite caps with 
which Walter Proffit was prepar- 
ing a coal blast exploded in his 
hands, inflicting severe injuries. 

Louisville— Three bandits raid- 
ed a card game at the home of 
Harry Silbernagle md secured 
$800 before escaping. 

Bath County.— While the tobac- 
co crop is not as good as last 
year's high prices are being re- 
ceived by the farmers of • this 
section for their 1919 crops. Most 
of the crops are averaging from 
40 to 00 cents per pound. Nothing 
but tobacco seems to interest the 
farmers, and while it is too early 
to talk 1920 acreage, the possi- 
bilities are that as large an 
acreage, if not a larger one, will 
be planted. Kveryone who raised 
tobacco last summer is contemp- 
lating planting as large an acre- 
age, and many are talking of in- 
creasing the acreage, while many 
farms are bring purchased 
for the purpose of raising* a crop. 



Satisfactory Glasses 

Our glasses' are comfortable when 

j 

fitted, and we keep them so for you 
free of charge. Any time they get 
bent or out of shape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 

Phone South 1746 

DR. N. F. PENN,6i3 Ma/Uim'K^cSISgtm, Ky 




r&^5r^^®=^Z3 £-i Sr-l S +&* 



LUTE BRADFORD 

^AUCTIONEER- 

Is well posted on prices, has a wide acquaintance and 
knows all the good buyers. 




Live Stock Sales a Specialty 

Can Give all the Reference You Want. 
Farmers Phone. TERMS REASONABLE. 

FLORENCE, KY., ,R. D. 



II 




It Helps! 

There can be no doubt 
as to the merit of Cardui, 
the woman's tonic, In 
the treatment of many 
troubles peculiar to 
women. The thousands 
of women who have been 
helped by Cardui in the 
past 40 years, is conclu- 
sive proof that it is A 
good medicine for women 
who suffer. It should 
help you, too. 

. Take 





gjThe Woman's Tonic 

Mrs. N. E. Vcrncr, of 
Hixson, Tenn., writes: 
"1 was passing through 
the . . . My Back and 
sides were terrible, and 
my suffering indescriba- 
ble. I can't tell just how 
and where I hurt, about 
all over, I think ... I 
began Cardui, and my 
pains grew less and less, 
until iwas cured. Iarrr 
remarkably strong for a 
woman 64 years of age. 
I do all my "housework." 

-Cardui, 



Try 1 



today. 



+ ...;..;., r ^..;.+4.++<..:":~H"e+++4"M'+4"t' ♦4H»4"t»4'4>4 "l" r'l " l l ' H '»4 ■• { ■ I I ' I ' li >■ I f * 

ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 
Subscribe for the Recorder. 

4 / +.|..j..t..H*++4 , ++4>++++++4*++++4 , + +++4"+++4^ , ++4 , ++++4"M"M-+4'+-H" 



NOTICE. 

All thosn indebted to the Burling- 
ton and Waterloo Teljphone Co. on 
account of bo* tent' or sW'tch dues 
must pay the same to W. !*• , Mar- 
hIihII, Secretary, pefore January 1* 
1U1S0. < HUBERT WHIT?;, 
offcu 2 SO Preside ^. 

FOR SALE 

Pure bred Barred Plymouth Ko<> 

( inkerele from laying strain.- M<x> 

.men. MRS. B. V. OHADUV, \ 

,>|.,,w Burlington R. I). 1. , 

Consolidated piioe SM 



3- 



Lost Certificate. 

I have lost my Burley Tobacco 
Warehouse Certificate No. 476. Infor 
mation as to its whereabouts will be 
thankfully received. 

R. E. GRANT, 
Burlington, Ky., R. D. 1. 

Wanted To Buy Farms. 

Auy sis* or location. Cash buyers 
for all kinds. Bend me list, slse 
and price. 

Win. E. HAIR1), 
10-oot Krlanger, Ky 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by (Adver- 
tising. 



iii\ 



♦ IMPORTANT NOTICE. ♦ 

♦ Watch the date following ♦ 

♦ your name on the margin ♦ 

♦ of your paper and if it is ♦ 

♦ not correct please notify ♦ 

♦ this office at once. If your ♦ 

♦ paper has been dlsconttnu- ♦ 

♦ ed by mistake before your ♦ 

♦ ' time expired do not delay ♦ 

♦ notifying this office. AU er- ♦ 

♦ 'rora are cheerfully correal- • 
a ed here. a 

♦ a 
eaaaaaee+eeaaeeeaeeeeeeeae 



Subscribe for th» H' MID**. 



c* 



V 



BBSMea ■ ':::' ■ * 



THURSDAY JAN. 8th, 10*20 



BOONE L.JNTV R&COP.DEK 



Wrv, 5 . 



£ 



* 



I 



WORLD NEEDS THE ELDERLY. 

Their Ripened Experience sad De- 
veloped Judgment Make Them of 
Value to the Community. 

Hardly anyone, If Indepd any- 
one at all, hold* at ^35 that he 
was wiser when he was 25, or 
says at 50 that he knew more, 
and had better judgment, whep 
he waa thlrty-tfive. Yet young 
men are prone to look upon old- 
er men as being dispetnsable. If a 
man could live to be two hun- 
dred years old, retaining hi* men- 
tal faculties unimpaired, leading 
an active life as a member of a 
profession or a man in business, 
his ripened experience, hie de- 
veloped Judgment, his vista, would 
make him worth aa much as a 
dozen youngsters fcn many re- 
spects. 

Dr. William Mayo of Minnesota, 
unlike Dr. Osier who retired dis- 
comfltted and never really ex- 
plained, when he made his fa- 
mous declaration and gave to the 
English language the term "osler- 
ized," says old men are the na- 
tion's greatest assets. Aboriginal 
savages aa^d the same thing. The 
aged Indian at the council 'fire was 
worth a score of young bucks on 
the battle line. 

One of the most valuable uses 
to which the experience of oia 
men is put is detecting the soph- 
istries of extremists and resisting 
agitators who urge perilous inno- 
vation. 

Doctor Mayo believes 15 years 
added to the average, life since 
the Civil war -constitutes a task 
only half done. Another 15 years 
may be added by medical and sur- 
gical science plus education which 
will lead to early adoption of 
preserve health. . 

The slogan. "A short life and. a 



♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

»- • 

• PLOKKNCK ♦ 

* • 

Corey Laile hqs mumps* 

L M. Rous.- and wife are occu- 
pying their new home 

Rev DeMoss was the Sunday 
guest of Arch Lucas and wife 

Mr*. >Ben Klumper was the New 
Year's guest of Mrs. Elmer Ca- 
hlll. 

Joseph and Frank Weiae were 
guests of Mrs. Jake Lowline last 
week. 

Robert Snyder bought a Stude- 
beker machine from C. W. Myers 
lust week. 

William Lidy, of S. D., waa the 
guest of Mike Cahill last Satur- 
day night. 

Mrs. Al Scott entertained Mrs. 
John Bentler and Mrs. T/ony GeL- 
ger, Thursday. 

Milton Goodridge, of Crestwood, 
Oldham county. Is here visiting 
his brothers, George and Will 

Mte&en' rve-at.^ec B.hl~ Helen Oar- 
hill spent' last Thursday with their 
grandparcnta, Mi*, and Mrs. Mike 
Cahill 

Jake Lowline sold his house and 
lot near the Methodist church to 
Henry Johnson, who expects to 
move there soon 

Messrs L. T. Utz, Stanley Lu- 
cas and Misses Eva Renaker and 
Oscie Oastleman attended the the- 
ater last Thursday night 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Whitson 
had as week's end guests Charles 
Whitson, wife and son, Walter, 
Misses Catherine Cook, Mary Whit 
Hon and Robert Whitson. 

Edgar Aylor and wife entertain- 
ed with a six o'clock dinner Mon- 
day evening Those present were 
Renay Tanner and wife, Goebel 
Stephens and wife, J S. Surface 
and wife, J G. and Paul Renaker 
and sister, Miss Eva 

Mrs Geo. Scott entertained with 



merry one'' shortens life. Doctor a six o'clock dinner last Tuesday 

Those present were Mrs W. H. 



Mayo says and robs a race of a 
social element— hale and useful 
seniors— upon which a value too 
high cannot be set. 

Assuredly, a sane life and a 
long one is desirable from the 
point of view of b o th the state 
and individual. 

The man who believes at fifty,, 
or sixty, or seventy, that his 
Judgment ia better than it former- 
ly was is altogether . rig"ht.— Louis 
ville Courier-Journal. 



CHEAP HOG FEED. 



Cheap feeds sound attractive to 
any feeder and feed to be cheap 5EEJS 
must be the kind that puts .on ' ' 
weight, not just low in price. Soy 
beans and corn, hogged off, Will 
be found one of the best a*id 
cheapest combinations and our 
farmers should plan to grow them 
next season. Grow them in tihe 
same row at the same time, plant 
ing shallow with bean attachment 
spacing the beans about 6 inches 
and the corn 16 inches or the 
regular distance used with corn 
alone, which, of course, varies with 
the fertility of the aoiL One 
feeder who used the*e together 
this year had one field that pro- 
duced a thousand pounds of pork 
per acre. 

The seed should be inoculated 
by spreading beans on the floor 
and sprinkling with a thin glue 
water and then dry dirt from soil 
that has grown beans, which has 
not been exposed to sun rays 
then stir with a garde i rake in 
such 
small quantity to each bean. 



Scott and daughters, Lillie and 
Eva and son, William, ■ and Mr 
and Mrs Arnold Bauers anddaugh 
ters Catherine and Mary Eliza- 
beth 

Prof Henry Rhoads visited our 
High School for the purpose of 
having it entered on the accred- 
ited list of High Schools In point 
of course, of study, subject mat- 
ter, classification, daily pro- 
gram and teaching force He ad- 
vised the purchase of an equip- 
ment to the value of $75 in ad- 
dition to what the school al- 
.ready had, and the Board of Trus- 
tees immediately authorized the 
Principal, A M. Yealey, to pur- 
chase the same This brings our 
High School up to the necessary 
requirement and will admit the 
graduates to the University and 
Association of Colleges of Ky 



jMow is the time Mr. Farmer for you to think 
of the seed you are going to plant this winter. 

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO PLANT? 
HOW MANY ACR£S WILL YOU SOW? 

What kind of seed will get you the best 
results ? 

THINK IT OVER. 

We are now prepared to take your order for 
any variety of winter seed. 

Fancy New Timothy, Kentucky Blue Grass, 
Orchard Grass. Red Clover, Alsike Clover, 
Alfalfa, Yellow and White Sweet Clover, 
Fancy Recleaned Red Top. 

It is a fact that in previous years prices 
of seeds have always jumped as the seed 
season advances, so why not play wise— 

GET YOURS NOW. 

You'll get the best of seed from us, high 
grade, high test, pure seed, and you will save 
money. 

WRITE NOW FOR PRICES. 



Its A Wise 

Practical head which decides to give Husband 
or Father, Brother or Sweetheart "A Warm 
Friend That Will Stick" when the cold winds 
blow. What would be more appreciated as a 
CHRISTMAS GIFT than a 

Suit or Overcoat 

WACHS has them for 

Men, Young Men 
and Boys 

Also a large stock of Sweater Coats, Corduroy 
and Duck Coats ; also Pants. Let us show them 
to you 




Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 



Northern Kentucky's! 



LEADING GROCERS 
AND SEEDSMEN. 




tfrEK-fcyj 



-3?i»2i:H2l" 




This is a hostorlc old church. 
Dr J. A. Kirtley, highly honor- 
ed and much beloved, served hero 
as pastor for nearly fifty years. 
A strong doctrinal preacher, he 
left his impress on the minds 
and hearts of all of the presont 
membership, who sat under his 
preaching. The present pastor ia 
grateful for the privilege of fol- 
lowing in service for God and 
men, a man who wrought so long 
and so well, for the good name 
and influence of Bro. Kirtloy* 
a manner as**to ' attach "a^f abides in all our community. 

Our church bore an honorable 

Son" D^VTamVa^r'A'goJd 5 : 



United States Wheat Directors License No. 010835-Y 



111 



TWO NEW ANIMAL PESTS. 



with late corn, use late beana , , Bum pledgef j aiul ll0W the 

The two crops can be grown to- 1 f afltor . \ f h t 

Sd^heV.'^ d^uot SWfffi «?* °' allWs as tliey fall 
Yield of coru materially on good! £■ ... , .„ . u ^--l 

soil and moisture conditions. It is ] Our \\ omans Missionary Ho- j 
said that the beans furnish more c » pl >' devoted Wednesday after- 
nitrogen for the corn plant and ; noon, January <th, to a special 
will Increase fertility with sue- ' service of intorceasary ^ prayer • in 

Mo- 
ulder 
Mis- 
thern 
rs and ,,M the "planted | Saptlst Convention. The offer- 
crops come through this will aid >ngs were credited on the cam- 
in keeping it clean; a round ! P.aign pledges and devoted to mis 
chunk of wood should be attach- , sion work in China, 
—j k *± Jwaa /k U Af frl -ii '* y ftu; « HI in fi 1 Wo nrt> irlad io nnt/> *>;it r.a.ncfi 
plowing is a good practice as is j of Mr. David Clements, of our 

church circle, into the University 




also the subsequent use of the 
weeder or harrow. 

Begin picking soy beans when 
the pods begin to fill and feed 
to the pigs for a week or two 
befor* turning hogs into the field 
and feed old corn for a short 
time after turning in which tends 



of Kentucky, at Lexington, for a 
special course in Agriculture. 

Some sickness among our peo- 
ple-Mrs. O. L. Smith, Mrs P. P. 
Neal, Mrs. Lon Utz, Mrs. Fannie 
Suljivan, Mrs. Kate Isaacs. 

The weather hinders attendance 
to the utilization of the bean i on a \\ church services, now, but, 



first producing growth and per 
mitting the corn to mature more 
and pigs will not eat too mu,ch 
green corn then for best resutls. 

In addition to corn and beans, 
all that is required are water and 
minerals. One hundred pounds of 
beans are more than equivalent to 
50 pounds of taekage at 600 
pounds per acre and is a low yield 
which at present prices figures a 
value of $15 per acre for the beana 
However, you will find after try 
ing this out, that this valuation is 
very low on account of the extra 
condition of the pigs. Some feed 
ets -eports gains of two pounds 
per day with beans and corn. Rye 



pastor Peyton is earnestly and 
prayerfully striving to bring 
some cheering, upbuilding and 
strengthening truth $o the at? 
tention of his people. Many are 
appreciative and responsive, and 
he trusts they may get a broad 
vision of our relation, as a church, 
to the upbuilding of the kingdom 
of Christ and be led to sincere 
devotion to his aervicet 



.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



(UINPOWDKR. 



R. E. Tanner and wife broke 
following this crop proJucci tine. bre ., d at Ed glayback's, las: Sun- 
day. 



Watch the Common Schools. 

The leaders of the public schools 
of Kentucky had better ke?p up 
a good organization and have a 
legislative committee at Prank- 
fort this winter. As has been 
the case every session for years 
the state institutions will main- 
tain a lobby to put thru legisla- 
tion to increase the yearly funds 
for the Normal schools and state 
university. The state is asking 
for ¥350,000, a like sum being giv- 
en them at the Isst session. These 
large sums cut the common 
school funds and hold down the 
Nilsrie* of the teachers of the 
common schools. Unless we have 
more work done fn the common 
schools we will hav*» but little 
need of the university ss but few 
will ever gel thst far.— Owen ('<>. 
lAmocrat. 



Noah Zimmcrimn and family 
were guosts at J. H. Tanner's, no ar 
Florence, Monday. 

Winter is on ami the mercury 
has registered near the zero 
maik several morning i. 

Noah Zimmerman and wife en- 
tertained several of their friends 
at dinner New Year's day. 

L. M. House moved to lis new 
honv near Florence last woek 
which lie purchased of Mr. 
Schmidt. 

Dr. L. K. Rouse and family, of 
Ludlow, spent New Year's day 
with his parents, Mr. and Mum. L. 
M. Rouse. 

Miss Shelly BaflOlir, of Orange 
Hull neighborhood, spent tna 
week's end with ItW mini, Mrs. H, 
K. Tan i. 



Hi. Yrlton has provided himself 
with a Ford runabout equipped 
' with started sad electric lights 



Two animals not much spoken 
of previously have gained promi- 
nence as destructive rodents dur- 
ing the past year, reports the 
chief of the Biological Survey, 
United States Department of Ag- 
riculture. One is the mountain 
beaver or sewellel? a curious ro- 
dent living in \he humid regions 
of the northwest coast. It was 
formerly considered harmless, t>ut 
with the development of agricul- 
ture in Its region it has become 
increasingly injurious to crops, 
particularly small fruits and mar- 
ket produce. Control measures 
have been devised, and represen- 
tatives of the department have 
given demonstrations in Oregon 
and Washington, where active 
measures were needed. 

The opher animal that has come 
into prominence as a destroyer is 
the cotton rat, a small rat-like 
rodent limited to the South At- 
lantic and Gulf States. Its depre- 
dations are principally in connec- 
tion with sugar cane in Florida, 
where experimental plantings with 
in •the past two years gave 
promise of very profitable devel- 
opment. So serious has been th? 
damage by cotton rats, however, 
that the principal company in 
terested in the development of 
the sugar cane industry in Florida 
has written the department that 
the success of the industry will 
be imp os s ibl e unless som» methoxt 
can be found for successfully con 
trolling the cotton rata Losses 
of from 40 to 60 per eent of t9w 
growing cane have been reported. 
The Bureau of Biological Survey 
however, announces the determin 
ation of successful poisoning meth 
ods, and it is believed, that thru 
demonstrations and advice, the 
growers will be able to control 
the rats and reduce the losses to 
a negligible amount. 

Another Old Citizen Gone. 

John Barnard, one of the oldest 
citizens in the northern part of 
the county died at his home on 
Garrison creek last Saturday. Mr. 
Barnard was over 80 years of age 
and had spent his long life in the 
neighborhood where he died. His 
father came to. that localbty in 
pioneer days and erected a grist 
mill which was operated by wat- 
er not far iAm the mv,..«ti of 
of Garrison creek. The mill drew 
custom for miles around and was 
noted for the quality of corn 
meal It produced. Mr. Barnard's 
iuneral took place at Bullittsburg 
Baptist church Tuesday. Thus 
one by one the old landmarks dis- 
appear, and scarce are the men 
who helped to blase the way for 
civilization in this part of the 
country. 

New York, Jan. 3.— Importer 
stocks of champagnes, wines and 
cordials to the value of 1*75,000 
a'-cording to valuation under pres 
ent arid coalitions, were distrib- 
uted gratis to patrons of the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria. McAlpin and Clu- 
ridge Hotels as the new yesr 
was welcomed, the managers of 
the hotels announced today. 

daiiurd County Paras sra 

chanui.iK limits rapidly in this 
COUn'y »* evtiemeU high prlCSS. 

They have brought from #I6'J i«er 
acrs to ll.intl for a two-acre farm. 
The ms.oiit) -mm m to he twinging 
from f!80 t<» c*»o per aere. 



INFLUENZA 

starts with a Cold 



Kin the Cold. At the first 

sneer* tmke 

HILL'S 



CASCARAk><ll)ININ 



bromid* 





Standard cold remedy for 20 years 

in tablet iorm— safe, aure, no 

opiate*— breaks up a cold in 24 

hours — relieves grip in 3 dart. 

Money back it it fails. The 

renuine box has a Red 

with Mr. Hill's 

"picture. 

At All Dm* Stmret 



IT'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 

Hudson Speedster $2315 40. 
Essex Touring $1568. 

^_ _ Essex Roadster $1588. 

Dodge Touring $1175. 

Dodge Coupe $1867. 

Dodge Sedan $2025. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above prices are delivered at your door. 

If you want to place an order for any of these cars, i^ 

. call £ 



3 

3 
* 

Or 

5 

3 
5 



B. B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. 



■I! 



Philip Taliaferro 

Undertaker 1 Embalmer 



NOTICE. 



'l'h'' annual election of the Board 
of Directors of the Hebron Telephone 
Co. will be held at Hebron at 1 p. m. 
Saturday, January 10th, 1920. All 
stockholders are requested to attend 
as there will be business of import- 
ance to consider. The annual state 
nient will show that the exchange 
property has been paid for and all 
other debts paid with a nice working 
balance on hand, or on the books, 
notwithstanding there have been re- 
ports to the contrary made by part- 
res w ho a re n ot c orrectly-inf o r m e d. 
J. B. CLOliD, Sect'y. 



WANTED 

Ageut wanted for good paying busi- 
ness. Address 

GEO. B. COE. 
jan. 1-8. Erlanger, Ky. 



Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 



ERLANGER, 
Phones 



KY. 



) Day: ErI. 87. 
t Night: ErI. 52-Y 



!.« 



4 



if! 



The B. B, Hume Automobile Co., Inc. 



j 



23-25-27 E. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 



J. H. CHOATS. 



I. L. HOOD. 



Ageuts. fbr the following Automobiles and Trucks*. 

Hupmo bile M ode l "R" 1 91 5 

$1,335 f. o. b. Detroit. 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All Calls Promptly Attended. 

Twenty-one years Practice. 
Phone 733 WALTON, KY. 



DR T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

<^as*tDBT4TIST^S^ 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



W- A- N -T-E- D 

B*«ch. Sycamore, Maple, 
Oak and Walnut Legs. 

If yon lnm» nny to soil writ* to 

C. C. MENGEL & BRO. CO. 
LoulavllU Kentucky 



KEN 



&&S9ES 




A 



W.TI.00MIS 



We have discontinued the sale of the Republic Truck and 
taken the Agency for the DENBV TRUCK. 

One Ton Denby r f 1,650 00 f. o. h. Detroit. 

Two Ton Denby $2,350 00 »• " 

Three and 1-2 Ton Denby $4,150 00 

Five Ton Denby $4.900 00 " 

We are prepared to take care of all repairs by expert mechanics. 
W. carry a full line of accessories, batteries and parts. 

Park Your Car with Us When In Covington — 25c per day ; 
50c Day and Night. 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 



• <i ?5S> 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 

Consolidated Phone 35. farmers Phone. 



♦ THADB AT HOMB ! 



•»»♦+++♦»♦»♦»»■» * » » +»4-»+++4-» ++++-r>-M"l"»4'+»*+-f ■M-l'-M' >♦»♦♦ 

Take Your County Paper, $1.50* 

Head Our Advertisements and Profit Ov tycm. 



♦ THtTtTTHHTTTvmH T«T V V TTit 



THURSDAY JAN. 8th, 1320 



4fWV£ GO. BLGM8E-R 

l'l l.l.i-lw n KVKRV TIIWFKPAT 
W. I.. KIDOIiLL, Publtajier. 



>' ill 1 1 . ]' 



I'.n 



THHflBAtCfl MARKET. 




MILLIONS IN TOBACCO 

MASSED IN KENTUCKY. 



Queen Nicotine has come 'unto 
her own'' as the leading prpdnet 
of Old Kentucky, 

Pox - years ahe was the running 
mate of the late John Barleycorn 
in importance in. the Blue Grass, 

Now that J. B. hns been secure- 
ly and thoroly laid away the fair 
miss is the undisputed champ. 

Tobacco valued at mo-e than 
*100,000,000 was raised in Kentucky 
during the year 191f>. 

The crop of I'll!) la estimated at 
411,000,000 pounds. 

Tb?s -eanaparOA with 427. n 00,040 
pounds in 1818 at** 1 :- 43 5 , 000,0 00 
pounds in 1117. 

One-third of the United States' 
crop 0/ 1,389,-185,000 pounds, the 
second largest on reeora, was 

frown In Kentucky. The Unite I 
states' crop, greatest La the world, 
has a money value of ; .\"i !•-'."> !7,'^0 i. 
the Department of Agricultnre "s- 
timatcs. Last year ih;> department 
figured the Kentucky crop as 
•worth ¥98,000,000, based On an av- 
erage price of 2.1c a pound pre- 
vailing Decerning 1, 1018. 
PRICES AKE SKY HIGH. 



Aurora, Jan. 3.— The loose loaf 
tobacco market sold today 65,176 
pounds at an average of $39.57 
per 100 lbs. Common grades were 
$2 to ji.'l higher, while bright to- 
baccos advanced from $10 to #15 
per 100 pounds. Severat 
sold at Si per pound. 



cents whenhcld up, and the high 
beat hTm iruo insensibil 



way man 
itv with 



a club. 



Plemi.ngsburg— The news reach 
ed here that a man from tine, 
mountains was coming to Plem 
iugshurg with 10 gallons of "white 
whisky'' he was met afar by per- 
sons who bought his stock for 
baskets ! $600. 

Lexington, Jan. l.-^Dean W. T. 
Lexington. Jan. 4.-That tobacco I Lafferty, of the College of Law, 
is selling at a price highly re- 1 University of Kentucky, is pre- 
munerative to the grower is ev- paring a hill to make more strin 
idenced by the report of the Su-'*** 114 the divorce laws of this 
pervisor of Sales Ben Bosworth State, and the General Assembly 
for the past week and for the will be akscd to pass it 
season to date. Sales for tjho Woodford count v.. -Wagons are 
week were 3,799,119 pounds^ for beginning to fill the pikes that 



IPUBLIC SALE. 



which the growers were paid an 
average of *18 a hundred pounds. 
Sales for the season to date 
from December 2, when the mar- 
ket opened, were 16,067,655 pounds 
which brought an average of $■!>%, 



l?.*iris. Jan. 3-— The w<>e.li'4 cl»s- 

ing on the Paris tobacco market 

I was the largest one of the sea- 

1 son, with juices strong for good 

! color y tobacco ai:'- -i trifle off 

on inferior grades. The iSi*"**"^ 

ent house sold during the we< r fc 

' 369,760 pounds for an average of 

$."0.09. The Bourbon house for the 

i week sold a total of 801,835 for 

:;n average of *!". 12, The total 

sales on the Paris market for the 

season amount to $3,592,475 lbs., 

I for an average of f56,0T. 



TtfP Kenton Loose Loaf Tobacco 

Bouse had a big sale last Mondav 

This year prices have soared trc ; and the management was highly 

[ pleased with the days 



mendously. For instance, Lexing- 
ton reported the second week's 
sales this year averaged 133 per 
cent higher the same- week in 19tS 
for the same week Mayvillc's 
average was $43 a hundred, a gain 
of $12 over the preceding like 
period, and Hopkinsville's average 
was $21.75, against $15.80 a year 
ago. On the Louisville market and 
on other markets exceptional new 
high records already have, been 
established. On some of the loose 
leaf floors the weed has sold in 
basket quantity as high as $1.56 
a pound. 

It is likely that the average 
price of all kinds of leaf grown 
in Kentucky is more than 30c a 
pound. This would put a valuation 
of approximately $132,000,000 o:< 
Kentucky's tobacco crop in 101 P. 
ACRE AVERAGE LOW. 

The record crop is attributed to 
the planting of the largest acre- 
age on record, due to the high 
prices offered early last season, 
yield an aero was only 830 pounds, 
compared with 900 the three pre 
ceding years, and the duality was 
only 81 per cent, against 86 in 1918. 
Drouth brought havoc to hopes 
of a tremendously large crop. 
The hurley end of tho crop is 
said to be shorter than usual. 
READY MARKET FOUND. 

Tobacco has created more ex- 
citement among farmers of the 
state than at any time since the 
famous night riding episodes of 
history. Farmers are delighted 
and buyers for big companies eag- 
er. It is believed that high 
prices rest upon the firm found- 
ation of greatly increased use of 
the weed and high prices being 
obtained for it in its manufac- 
tured state. Some crops already 
sold have averaged a* high as 
$1.05 a pound, and raanv around 
the 90 cent and $1 level. 

Farmers who formerly merely 
rented their land from large plan- 
tation owners now are purchasing 
the acreage from the> proceeds of 
this year's crop alone. Speculation 
in tobacco lands is rampant. Lim 
ousines are becoming common in 
the tobacco sectiona One farmer 
is reported to have received as 
much for !0 acres of tobacco as 
his 220-acre farm cost in 1878, 
while another obtained $1001 more 
an acre for a crop than he paid 
for the land on which the leaf 
was grown, 

GROWERS ORGANIZED. 

Agitation against the use or to- 
bacco has resulted in an organiz- 
ation of broad scope, with branch 
es thruout the ata^, of growers 
and the ''antis." The money 
value of the crop each .year is 
more than one-fourth the total 
value of all crops grown in the 
state, Tobacco yield per acre is 
worth five or six times as much 
as any other crop, but, of course, 
requires more care. 

Louisville is the largest hogs- 
head tobacco market in the 
world, and Lexington is the big- 
gest loose leaf market. There 
are more than 50 loose leaf mar- 
kets in the state now, and more 
•re springing up each year. 
Among the largest, other than 
Lexington are Owensboro, Mays- 
ville, Shelbyille, Paris, Hopkins- 
ville, Henderson, Glasgow, Car- 
rollton, Bowling Green, Carlisle 
and Cynthiana. 

Louisville's tobacco sales, which 
had been on the decline this 
year, have exceeded those of the 
preceding years, oven the busv 
year of PUG. This market hand- 
les a lot of redried loaf during 
the summer months, while the^ 
loose leaf floors aro closed. Late- 
ly? also, it has obtained an uo- 
usually large amount of storage 
business, leaf sold on other mar- 
kets being stored here until need- 
ed for manufacture. 

Louisville's total sales for the 
year probably represo-nt 80,000,000 
pounds or more, figuring the av- 
erage hogshead of loon pounds, 
which, at 30c a pound of an av- 
erage, means a volume of about 
$24^)00,000 of business. Thli swell, 
local bank deposits anil create, 
prosperity in general, also bring- 
ing taxes to (he city, county arid 
state. This doe* not take into 
account the tobacco manufactur- 
ing buaine.'.s here. Louia\ IHo he 
uig one of the largest cumtei , i 
the country in thai reejM'ct, 

Tobacco powers ol Km tuck) 
ere receiving about J.flrt times i , 
much for their crops as In Mill, 
• riling tO an average .nii>. i 
•l bi comparing price ■ prevailing 
••it i!>> toual market now 
Jui lug IB 1J. Some grade* have ml 
* mined nearly (to per evut 



Among the big sales of the day 
was a crop of 665 pounds raised 
on E. H. Blankembeker's land by 
Fd. Borders This crop brought 
an average of $95.85. The highest 
price for the day was $102 per 
100 ounds. The Kenton Loose 
Leaf house is pleased with the 
patronage it is receiving on the 
part of the Boone county 
ers. 



State News. 

Lebanon— Local coal yards have 
been bare for a week, and the 
shortage lias become a serious is-i 
sue. 

Whitesburg— Bates and 
Tactions, which clashed Christmas 
Day. appeared in court and made 
pledges to keep the peace. 

Milton— Frank Thompson, 12 



lead to the various sales rooms. 
All that have sold their tobacco 
are well pleased with the prices 
they have received. The Aigh 
prices that have bee.i paid for to- 
bacco is causing the sales of many 
farms, and many others are l>eing 
divided - rnto smaii farms, Wnich 
are bringing fancy prices. 

Scott County.— Stripping tobac- 
co, discussing the tobacco markets 
and making plans for the coming 
. ,#oi) is giving the farmers of 
this county plenty to do and 
plenty to talk about. Tobacco is 
n subject of which no one seems 
to tire. Hog killing occupied a 
prominent place on the cofd 
days, and a large number of hogs 
have been slaughtered. Farmers 
are now feeding their stock. Small 
grains have done well were sown 
early, but thoso sown late in 
some places have not made their 
[work. I appearance. Most of the hogs have 
gone to market, and the farmers 
seem fairly well satisfied with the 
prices. When the European mar- 
kets open up the farmers who 
have good brood sows will be 
glad they have not sent them to 
the markets. 

Ohio County.— We have been 
having some freezing and thawing 
of the soil, which makes it very 
hard on wheat, of which there is 
a very small acreage in this sec- 
tion. Most of it is very late. 
Almost all the corn is in the 
crib. This crop is short, but with 
reasonable economy there will be 
enough to feed until a crop can 
be raised. There is much trad- 
ing in real estate, and until about 
| a year ago land has always been 
, I too cheap, but after it started up- 
ward it has kept going, until it 
seems that it has about reached 
the limit In fact some land has 
sold for more than it is worth 
for Jarming purposes, but the oif 



Having sold my farm, I will offer for sale at my 

residence on the Dixie Highway, two 

miles south of Florence, Ky., on 

Saturday, Jan'y 10 

— 1920 

The Following Personal Property : 

7-year old Mare, 8-year old Mare, 3 fresh Cows with calves by their side, 1 Cow will be 
fresh by day of sale, 5 coming 2-year old Heifers with calf, 3 last spring Heifer Calves, 
1 Shorthorn Bull coming 2 years old, 3 dozen Chickens, Rood Wagon with Boxbed and 
Sideboards, Spring Wagon, Buggy, ^Haybed, 2 -horse Sled, Mowing Machine, Hayrake, 
Riding Cultivator, Single Shovel Plow, Double Shovel Plow, Hinge Harrow, Doubletrees 
and Singletrees, 1 dozen Cow Chains, Cypress Incubator 120 egg capacity, 5-ten gallon 
Milk Cans, Milk Cooler and many articles too numerouS.to mention. 



grow- 



TERMS OF SALE. 

On all sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over that 
amount a credit of 9 months without interest will be given 
purchaser to execute bond with approved security, negoti- 
able and payable in the Florence Deposit Bank, Florence, 
Ky., before removing property. 



years old, died from a wound j people are getting active again, 
sustained when his gun was acei-.j an d it is quite possible that land 



dentally discharged while htuiiing 
rabbits. 

LaGrange— Basement diggers at 
the high school building unearth- 
ed several skeletons, the site hav 
ing been part of a burial ground 
for slaves. 

Salvisa,— Smith Haig, colored, 
merchant, could produce only 30 



has not sold for more than it is 
worth as an oil producer. No cat- 
tle are being fed for market in 
this section, and the hogs have 
about all been shipped out, and 
very few farmers are breeding ex- 
tensively for spring farrow. The 
slump in hog prices will very ma- 
terially curtail next year's hog 
crop. 



Notice. 



MY SALE OF 

THE J. B. CONRAD FARM 

Advertised for 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1920 
Has been Postponed. 

WALTER FLORENCE. 



O. P. Rouse. 



Sale, to begin at 12 o'clock sharp. 



€fo.S5ified Qduertisemen ts. 

For Sale-FRESH MILK COWS 
AT ALL TIMES 

CLAUD CONNER, 
* LUDLpW R. D. 2, 
Pt. Pleasant church. Boone 



Near 
County, Ky 



au£. 20 



For Sale-10 70-pound pigs W. 
T^ Spears, Union, Ky. 

For Sale— A few purebred Ches- 
te. white pigs S. B. -Ryle, Grant, 
Ky, R. D. 1. 



Farm Notes. ' 

Furnish the tenant with plenty 
I of land to grow oats, potatoes 
| and sorghum. 

Select your plant bed space on 
good rich close land. Use stalk 
and fertilizer for early tobacco 
plants. 



Sheriff's Sale for Taxes. 



Notice is hereby given that I, or 
oue of my deputies will, on Mondav, 
February 2nd, 1920, it being County 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. m. and 3 o'clock p. m. at the Court 
House door, in the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., expose to 
Iiublic sale for cash in band, the fol- ' 
owing property, or bo much thereof ] 
as may be necessary to pay State, 
County and School tax due thereon j 
and unpaid for the year 1919, and the ; 
penalty, interest and costs thereon. 

For a complete description of prop- ; 
erty see Assessors Book for the as- j 
sessment for 1918, at the County 
Clerk's Office: ^- 

L. A. CONNER, 
Sheriff Boone County. 

Burlington Precinct. 

Mauniug, Jasper, 4 acres * 7.48 

Florence Precinct. 

RobinBon, J. C. n r 18 acres $17.65 

Merrill, S. B. n r, town lot 7.90 

Fane, Marcus Est. 15 acres . 
Carpenter, Mary A, town lot, 
Cleek, Albert, town lot. 

Constance Procinct. 
Phelps, Lewis, n r, town lot. . 

Rush, James, town lot 

Zimmer. B. F., town lot 

Petersburg Precinct. 
Collier, Frank, n r, town lot 
Jarrell, Lewis, n i\ town lot. . 
Lawrenceburg Ferry, town lot. 
B u l littsvillo Pr e cinct. 



Public Sale! 



Having sold my farm, I will offer at public auction at my residence 
on Big Bone and Beaver Pike, at creek crossing, on 

Saturday, Jan, 10th, '20 



/ 



7.70 

11.35 

7.92 

8.88 
n.90 
9.86 

11.40 
6.78 
7.02 



the following described property, 



1,500 pound 7-year old Mare, 

with fistula, in foal by hone 
1 extra good driving Mare 

1 6-year old sorrel Mare 

2 8-months old Percheron Colts 
1 5-year old fresh Cow 

1 5 -year old Cow to be fresh in 
March 



1 3-year old Cow to be fresh in 

March 
1 2-year old Heifer to be fresh 

in March 
9 yearling Steers 
5 1 Sheep from 1 to 4 years old, 

all good, and will be sold in 4 

lots 



8.77 



For Sale—Four year old Polfed 
Jersey cow with heifer calf by 



her sido Hon g. Houston, Burling 
ton, Ky Call 235-x or Farmer 
phone 



„/<■>£ Sale-Three fresh rows 
w Quigley, Limaburg, Ky. 



J. 



I LAM FOR SALE-Best team of 
farm horses in Boone county- 
quality, age, color, size and con- 
formation Purchaser to be the 
i ud *« C II. YOUBLL. 



Loat-ChrJ*tnia« day in the morn 
wig, on dm road between BurJJn*- 
ton and Constance on dirt road, 
ay Qordon South*r»«, child's Beal 
■km muff, Hack trimmed in 
white. Finder will efnfcr a favor 
l«y returning to Mrs. Wallet Ar- 
a<HU, Burlington i:. n, :j. 



Geese are profitable on farms 
and many new, good pillows will 
be needed when the newlyweds 
go to housekeeping. 

The acreage sown to wheat in 
ten of the best wheat producing 
states show a reduction of nearly 
14 per cent, under last year. 

The average farmer farms too 
slow, he is too long in getting 
his stock and crops to market. 
Lets whip up a little in 1920. 



10.68 
5.80 



Anderson, E. M. n r town lot 

Belleview Precinct. 

Wingate, L, n r, 19 acres. ; . . 
Wilson, Elizabeth, town lot. 

Hamilton Precinct. 

Rice, Erastus, 2 acres 3.25 

.Union Precinct. 

Rusk, Wayne, n r, 80 acres 28.71 

Verona Precinct. 

Blessing, W. H. Ill acres 180.33 

Wanted. 

Man with small family to raise 
tobacco and work by the day. 
H. D. SOUTHER, 

D. 3, Consolidated 

• ojan22 



Terms of Sale. 

Eight mouths time will be given on all purchases with six per 
cent int erest fr om date, purchaser t " giv tint with gnpA sorrtrity. 



J. A. LOOMIS. 

Sale to begin promptly at 12:30 p. m. 



Burlington R. 
phone. 



Sweet feeds are fine to hold 
flesh on your milch stock. Salt 
regularly and see that they get 
good fresh Water each day. 



The retired farmer who at- 
tempts to live without something 
to do as a rule is not satisfied. 
Better buy a run down place put 
a good man on it and experiment 
1 a little even if you hate moved 
to town. 



Three fi 
their tid, 
H l>. 



ror Sale 

> l>v 

I I ml 

.,' 'I 1 . 'V' ^veral pure bred K 
' • Ko< u poi Iterate al |1 mi 

'' ■ I I I Iw* Walton k v 



sll lull s V il h 

. R. M. Wil - 



each 

i»ut . 
It 



Work on II 

.iii .mi (he r, 



Lost Certificate. 

rii,. Warchmtu (Jsrtlflsata lasued 

I M< W . -thy iii tlo- Murliy To 

baecu Company fomtock has boen 
lusl anil til* number n| nald rertlhS 
<»ui. ik unknown to ni*». Any Infer- 
iiiatlon iy» to ih.. whereabouts «rn*id 
■ • niflcat. win b« gladly received bv 
1 1 1 d i« r ■ 1 )t n 

Mrn J I M, W.ihy, 

Pstarshttrg, Ky 



NOTICE. 



Have lost my certificate of stock 
in the Burloy Tobacco Company. 
JOHN W. FISHER, 




I' \K 



OI N I \ I'M'KK, 



WHY BUY A SCRUB 
SIRE 

JERSEY HILL FARM 

The Home of Pure Bred 

JERSEY CATTLE 



Chcsterwhite Hogs 

offer* for tale • few choice boer 
pift. Price* Reeauneble. 

8. B. RYLE, 

R. 1 Grant, Ky., 

Farmers Phmnm. 



Things Necessary to Insure 
Good Service. 

1st.— A large capital and surplus so that you have 
absolute security for your deposits and where 
you can get the accommodation of a large loan 
when you need it. 
2nd —Officers who take a personal interest in your 
private affairs and ever ready and willing to as- 
t sist you with your business regardless of how 

small a matter it may be. 
3rd— Courtesy, honest business methods, sufficient 
and competent office force, and a desire to have 
you succeed in business. 

YOU WILL FIND ALL OF THIS AT THE 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

< Burlington, Kentucky, 

Largest Country Bank in the Sixth DUtrict. 

Capital $50,000. Surplus and Profits $100,000. 

W. L. B. ROUSE, President. A. B. RENAKER. Cashier. 

EDGAR C. RILEY, Vice-Pres. 
NELL H. MARTIN, Asst. Cashier. L T. UTZ, Aest. Cashier. 





LOST * 

lltt wi in Ft. Mitrludl car lino and 
Ploreuo* lic-Hvv iioM» HlaiikM 
HKV. OKKALl) DON NOLL) , 

Hi. Paul's (liun-li Floi ivy, 

. ujenri 

TAKB VOl'lt i Dl NTS I VI'KH 



NOTICE. 

I have fstlnd to recelvn Oeffetfloata 
No I4NS In tli« Miirluy TobaooO 

representing imtitA worth of stock 
and am making application to sei.l 

.pany fork duplinate stool 
tlfl.K W N II 

It IV M K>. 



h 



> 



it 



- 



mm 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



i 



* 



I 



THURSDAY JAN. 8th, 1920 






^ — 

Having sold my farm, the Old Daniel Bedinger Homestead, half -way between Richwood and 
Beaver Lick, Ky., I will sell at Public Auction on the premises, beginning at 10 a. m. sharp 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 9th, 1920 



The Following Described Property: 



CATTLE--13 tfood Milk Cows all bred and will he fresh s.on, ! SHEEP -2.^ Full Blooded Hampshire Ewes, 28 good grade ewes, 
2 Shorthorn Cows, Shorthorn Polled Durham Bull. 4 lons^ year- j Hampshire Buck. Oxford Buck. A Complete Set of Farming 
lin«f Steers, 2 Jersey Heifers, 2 Shorthorn Heifers, 4 timing: k Implements. Ford Runabout. Feed, Etc.— Lot Timothy Hay 
yearling Heifers, yearling Steer. Hogs — 2 Sows and 1'itfs, ; in barn. 150 barrels tyood Yellow Cum, 1U0 Shocks of Fodder. 
20 Shoats, will average aLout 120 pounds. Household and Kitchen Furniture, and many other articles. 



HORSES AND MULES- 5 year old Gelding ; 6 year old Driv- 
ing and Work Mare; 8 good/ work Mules from 4 to 8 years old; 
2 year old Mule; 1 aged Mule. Jack Stock— 5 extra good Big 
Jennets with 3 Jack Colts and 2 Jenny Colts; 2 year old Jennet; 
Yearling Jennet, and 3 year old fine ^lack Jack. 

Manure Spreader, Cider Mill, 3 Riding Cultivators, 60-Tooth Harrow, Corn Crusher and Grinder, Power Cutting Box. Oliver Riding Breaking Plow, Nos. 20 and 30 E Oliver 
Breaking Plows, Hillside Plow, 5-ft. Deering Mower, Deer-ing Hay Rake, Big "A" Harrow. Potato Plow Digger, HayVTedder. Dozen Barn Door Hinges. Gate Hinges, 3 5-gal- 
lon Cream Cans, Cream Separator, 60-gallon Oil Tank, 6 Troughs, 8 sets Work Harness, Collars, Bridles, 2 Grindstones, Emery Wheel 2 Horse Carriage, 2 Horse Corn 
Planter, 1-horse Corn Planter, Incubator, 5-shovel Cultivator, Sled, 2 Farm Wagons and Boxbeds, Hay Frame, Tobacco Frame, Potato Planter, 2 Tobacco Trucks. 
TERMS OF SALE— All sums of $10 and under, cash; on all sums over $10 a credit of 6 months will be given without interest, or 3 per cent, off for cash. Notes payable at the Equita- 
ble Bank, Walton, Ky. • 
COL. W B. JOHNSON. Auctioneer. 
THE LADIES OF THE CHURCH WILL SERVE LUNCH. 



J. C. BEDBNGER, Walton, Ky, 



wns-rarmsa 



Goode & Dunkie 

280 Lb.. Ohio River Salt $2.50 

5 Gallon Can New Orleans Molassess $7.50 

The Best you ever tasted. 

100 Lbs. Best Michigan Navy Beans $8.00 

60 Lb. Box Werk's Tag Soap $6.25 

14 Gallon Keg Kraut $6.75 

47 Lb. Can Patridge Brand Pure Hog Lard $12.75 

ARCADE FLOUR, Barrel $13.00 

Dried Apples, per pound 25c 

Golden Blend Coffee, lb 45c 

1 $2.00 worth sent postpaid. 

START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT, SENE> US YOUR ORDER 

AND SAVE MONEY. 



CONSTANCE 



♦ i ♦ 



bl'RLINGTON R. D. 2. 



♦ a 

♦ * 

♦ a 



PETERSBURG. 



a 
a 
a 



Mrs. Fanni? Berkshire is quite 



The holidays passed very quiet- ' Mrs. E. R. Scott is much i.nprov- 
|.. cd after a serious illness. m. 

Miss Margaret Mover spent th- Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Presser are Mra . Ros8 Shinkle has been ill 
holidays with relatives in Ohio. parents of a little son since De- for some time. 

Mr. * Milner entertained all his ccmber 17.— William Ryle. Miss Eunice Willis is the guest 

children and grandchildren with a Miss Sophia Weisi/kle, of Pet- r Miss Edna Berkshire. 
Christmas dinner. ersburg, visited her aunt. Mrs., Charles Klopp is visiting friends 

There is ice in the river ana Ransom Ryle, last Thursday. I r ^ a r Brooksville, Indiana, 

the gasoline boat is all that is Mrs. Fannie Sullivan ••emains ; The river is filled with float- 
running at present. very id at the home of hirdaugh- ing j ce an( j no eoaj m either of 

Mr. and Mis. J. E. Zimmcr are tpr . Mrs. Geo. Horton, near Ln-: t he coal yards, 
the happv parents of a little ; ion - „,. . . fc , .. Captain Alden and wife and Hu- 

son, born 'January 3rd. .1 Miss Elizabeth Byie was the | be rt Walton and wife are the 



Aubrey F. Milner has returnee Ruest of relatives in the Locust 
to Georgetown after spending ihe prove neighborhood several days 
holidays with his parent*. | l a8 £ week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Dolwick en- , Mrs. Lawrence Pope entertained 
tertained his mother, Mrs. Kate with an elegant dinner on New 
Dolwick and family with a New 'Year's day. More than 30 guests 
Year's dinner. j were present. 

_ J. W. Rvle and wife, Mrs. Lina 

! McMlullen 'and H. W. Williamson 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•• \ wer e gueBts at David Williamson's 

• ' last Thursday 



guests of relatives in Louisville. 

Robert Hoffman and wife are 
on an extended visit at the home 
of their son Leonard, who Uvea 
in Cynthiana. 

Judging from the explosion of 
fire arms on the streets of this 
town at night, pistol toting has 
become quite a fad. 

The members of the local Bap- 
tist church gave a surprise social 



wede 



f un/ff& 



GROCERIES. FL OUR SEEDS. MEDICINES. 
13-21 PIKE ST. 18-20 W. 712*5 T. 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 



Phones South 335 and 336. 



1^**^2Z*£!££££L^*^1 I Mr - and Mrs - Raymond Smith. to Rev . Mr. Swindler, who receiv- 

t? ? t? o u J and famU y viBited Mre - Smith's e d manv substantial gifts. 

Miss Loretva Hogan was at home father, Joe Rich, of Big Bone, j w H / P< Holloway is to open a 

for the holidays. * one day last week. i unc h room on Saturday Slight, 

Our school is closed as the ; Miss Lutie Ryle resumed her , where all kinds of eatables and 

teacher, Miss Riddell, resigned. | duties as teacher at Beech Grove j 30ft drinks will be served. 

Horace Cleveland returned to ; Monday morning following the j TY ^ Sunday school class of Mrs. 
Translyvania College Monday af- Christmas holidays. w. T. Berkshire gave a leap year 

ter spending the holidays at home 1 Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Clements ( par ty at her home on Friday ev- 
with Mr. and Mrs J. W Riggs. I an d family and Mr. and Mk-s. Jas. ening. The evening was spent in 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kelsoe, of West and children were guests of playing various games. 
Detroit, Michigan, spent the Xmas i Mr. and Mra Ray Williamson last | l. l. Chambers, one of the 
holidays with their daughter and Saturday. j m0 st enterprising auto salesmen 

sor»-in-aaw, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey | Mr. and Mrs. J. D. McNeely en- in the county, is arranging to 
Souther. . (tertained the foUowing guests last op e n a gales room In the build- 

Mrs. Sarah E. Tanner and Mhan 1 Thursday : Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Mc inK formerly occupied by W. R. 
ter Fsancis Keene Souther, chap- Nfeeiy and son, James Lee, of BeW- Gordon. 

eroned by Mrs. Keene Souther, at- levue; Mr. and Mrs. Lee McNeely, Mra Jennie Yerkes and family, 
tended the New Year's party Fri- of Burlington ; Rev. R. C. McNee- o{ Newport, who were here spend 
day afternoon at the home of i y and Perry Johnson. , i ng Christmas with relatives, have 

Allan Stewart and Melvin Louis _ returned home, and her daughter, 

Kenyon. Quite a number of boys ^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eaaeee Mra Hairy Drake, spent New 
and girls and mothers were pres- ^ # Year's with her. 

ent and all enjoyed the after- ] ^ DEVON • j Miss Nellie Stephens entertasn- 

roon playing games and eating ■■ + * a ed, Tuesday evening in honor of 

I candy. An excellent lunch wasserv , ^ ##>4#################### he r brother, Lieua., W. G. Steph- 
ed including ice cream and cake • „ ... Houst > , _ _,, after ens, who is now located at Nor- 
and all the delicacies of the sea- j ^« fhee H^e^hom^^anef ^ ^ w&y _ 

son - j Latonia mier, of Dayton, Ohio. The ev- 
"" Mr. Conrad Sehadler, who has ening was spent in dancing after 

♦ I been suffering with "blood poison- whicb , an excellent luncheon was 

* ing in his hand, is improving. : served. _^_^_ 

•I Little Stella Elizabeth Miller is 



United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



tries, by making the production 
tax in lieu of all other and reg- 
ulation of drilling. 

•'The creation of a more effi- 
cient and comprehensive depart- 
ment of labor. 

"The construction and main- 



MORROW URGES 

LEGISLATION. 

Frankfort, Jan. 6.— Governor Ed- 
win P. Morrow in his message to tenance of a permanent system of « week. 

the General Assembly, which he highways. | Mr. and Mra Chris Whitaker 

delivered orally at the Joint sea- ^The correction and revision of moved to J,ames Barlow's, last 



*♦••♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

• ♦ 
a HEBRON. a 

♦ a 

Mra J. n. Miannm had a new 
piano delivered to her home last 




spending a few davs with her *ee*e*eaaa.aeeaeeeaee*a*»W 

Mise Eunice Willis is the guest grandmother, Mrs. H. E. Miller, of , ♦ „»„„,„, „ lt5r , * 

of friends in Petersburg. : |ig Bone. , ♦ RABBIT HASH. * 

Our coldest weather su far this ; ift r9 . Golda "Waters, of Coving- » ' ♦ 

season was two below zero, last ton, came out Saturday and re- eaeaeeeaaaaeaeeeeeaaeeeae* 
Saturday morning. mained until Monday, guest of : The river is full of ice and na- 

Farmers have taken advantage M r s. Jos. Sehadler. , vigation has been suspended, 

of the unusual ice harvest and j Q Co ,i ma , Q f Akron, O., arriv- Ben C. Stephens, census enumer- 
m ?i £ f 4 he w houses are tiilcd ; ed here for the holidays and is ator, began work last Friday. 

H. E. Fisher came over from I th t of W9 grandparents, Mr. Chaa Dolph, of Belleview, waa 

Lawrenceburg Sunday for a visit d ^ Frank g wilUams. , calling on friends here Sunday 

with Jus kmspeople tlw? VV. T. 1 - _ ,_*__ „„j #„„:i„ WQ .w» ' R- M. Wilson was supplying the 

Berkshire'a Ben). Bmtow fnd f amdy ^ w^ere ^^ with freah b^efVat B wee k. 



orally at the Joint 
aion in the House chamber Tuea- the present tax law, ao as to 
day, laid down a preliminary pro- make asaeaaments of every class 
gram which he Bummed up as fol- of property Just and equitable and 
Iowa: to limit within reasonable bounds 

"The repeal of the law now pro the arbitrary power of the state 
vkling for the control ol our char tax commission to increase assess 
itable and penal institutions, and rnents made by local boards, 
the passage In its stead of a com. "Minimum county school levy 
prehensive law which shall prop- with increased salaries for teach- 
erly provide for their operation ers and an educational survey.'' 
under a system which shall in- j Morrow said h;» would oppose 
crease efficiency in their manage any measure seeki.ig political ad- 
ment and forever divorce them vantage for his own party, 
from the evils of political con- 1 Joe Bosworth of Middleshpiro, 
troL ! Republican leader, was rlected 



•The enactment of legislation 
for the benefit of the Btate's 

fiublic schools and institutions of 
ligher learning. 

"The ratification of the federal 
amendment grsntlng equal suff- 
rage to women and for their en- 
franchisement in state and nation. 

"The enforcement of nation and 
state-wide prohibition. 

"The repeal or amendment <>f 
• he present compulsory primary 
••lection law for state officers. 

*The dismissal tfrom office of 
any officer charged with the du- 
ly of protecting prisoners, who 
shall surrender Them to mob*. 

"The development of our ftgrb 
. uKursl and natural resources, In- 
iludlug the stl.nulatlon and peo- 
UM«iM>a of our oil sua gs> nulus- 



speaker of the House and the 
Democrats organised the Senate 
by re-electing Charles M. Harris, 



week. 

Mr. and Mra. Morris Rouse en- 
tertained several relatives last 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Aylor had 
several ot their relatives as their 
guests last Sunday. 

Hallam Clore, of Dayton, spent 
several days last week with his 
friend, Myron Garnet t 

Mra Moae Aylor and Mrs. Frank 
Aylor apent New Year's day at 
Robt Snyder**, near Hopeful. 

Misses Marquetta and Allene 
Stephens, of Bullittsvllle, were 
guests of Misses Lenora and Alice 
Graves last week. 

The following officers were elect 



Versailles, president, pro tern, ed or reelected last Saturday, at 
who, Instead of Lieutenant Gov- the annual congregational meet- 
ernor S. T. Ballard will name the ing of th* church: Elder— R. C. 
committees MHHasson; Deacons— O. C. Hafer 

William O'Connelf, of Newport/ «»<* H'M.ry OetkerjTrustee-W. 
wss re-elected clerk of the Senate. 'A . Bu loek ; {jmrlrter ~ JJaroW 

The Republican House and Saw- i f ". Kler n ; ^^ ,ri. f L ^ 
ate raueua indnrsed woman suf« Mjke Dv,v Officers for Sunday 
fr«»« School « 8upt.-A1b*rt Ostktrl Aa- 

» - .ststsnt Supt.-tuth.r House: Sec- 

_. 1, . . , w-«- retsry — MIsh Mary ('oinier; Treas- 

The high price, wh rh turkeys ttrVildwUCHglar, Sundsy school 



Miss Maud Norman Asbury and ' guests of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mc- u ^ hert McCoskey. of Scottahurg, 
_Jr. Kirtley Cropper returned to 1 Coy, Monday and to be with Indian is visiting his sister, Mra 
Lexington, Monday, after a very tJ * eir «"&* Mrs. Vallandingham. • Car , yl £ 
gay Christmas recess sjient at Charley Glass, of near Inde- j Mra Minnie Miller, of Brashear, 
homev •, pendence Station, was operated on ^ visiting her parents, Mr. and 

Mra. Corrine Riely, Misses Edna Tuesday for appendicitis. We are Mr8> R- f # Stephens. 
Berkshire, Lizzie Watlon and Ed- glad to report that he is 1m- Solon Ryle bought of the heire 
na Riley were charmingly enter- , proving nicely. f the late William Clore, sixty- 



talned Monday by Mrs. Thomas G 
Willla 
Mra Henry Smith and children 



The dance given by Mr. aind five acres of the land he owned 
Mrs. Albert Underhill during the at the time of his deaths 'and 
holidays, waa greatly enjoyed by J which was formerly a part of 
returned Friday from a pleasant ■ all present. A large crowd re- j the Jonas Clore farm, 
visit with her brother, Mr. Geo. < sponded to their invitation. Mfa B. C. Kirtley has been very 

Rue and Mra Rue, in Hooven, In- j jjrs. Ben Bristow and daughter, sick for several days with abscess 
dl £ n *- ^ . , . , Miss Jane, entertained Wednesday of the liver. Dr. Carlyle, who waa 

The two holiday dances given Mr and ftIrs ^ p rB nk McCoy and treating her, called Dr. Carol hers, 
by the young men of Petersburg j tho ' ir gU ests, Mrs. Vallandingham of Cincinnati, Saturday night and 
were immensely enjoyed by the and daughter Lula Catherine 1 they decided an operation neces- 
local society people. _ Mrfc vallandingham and little ' »* V Y wh i ch was Performed that 



Dr. Raymond Cropper, of Ala- »« ; * ""^"sX" 1 !! le arrived »^t. It was successful and she 

tma, and Mr. ELirl Cropper, of ' r ,au * f, il e1, . OI Baa » e ^ llu > arm , w -. j_ : 

Paducah, were recent guests of i h ^ re _ M ; onda y_ € Y enin f a i ,d ^^IZ 



bama, and Mr. E,irl Cropper, 

ed until Thursday, guest 
Ira "fi ii'm ! [^» ta »• ™ d *** Fr " nk ** 

Paul Tanner, who is with 



_ is now doing nicely, 
of her 



brought this winter Will atiinulute 
the effort to InerciiMt t Imi «U< 
flocks (or the next aeason. Tha 
woman war* about as much ei- 
eitad or«jr the tarhay inara* as 
th* man are over tha tobaeeonar- 
ket. 



»y 

Sunday sftrrnoon at two o'elock 
this year. 

All are sorry to lusr of the 
desth of M. C. Weaver, which oc- 
curred st his hoiae In Temieaae* k\>vtoitum sad Mr. Thosaa* 
S*V»rat day* SgV. "N'ton llUey. of I*. tei.k-uig 



entertained the young set with a 
leap year party Friday ni>;ht in 
honor of Miss Frances \irginia 
Berk ah Ira. 

Lieutenant Goebel Stephens, of 
Fortreaa Monroe, and Miss Vera 
Whamaeyr, of Dayton, O, "Were 
the house guests of Mi*a Nell 
Stephena the past week, have re- 
turned home. 



his 
grand parent, Mr. Robert North- 
cutt and attending school at In- 
dependence, spent the holi lays 
with his father, Alfred Tanner, 
of Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mr*. Joe. Coombs, of Ft 
Mitchell, had for guests, on New 
Year's day, Ben J. Bristow mid 



a 



GRANT R. D. 



* 



Mra Jaraee 8. Asbury entertain- family, of Devon ; "ft. S. Bristow 



ed tha following gueats (luiHtBi»a | 
week : Mia* Normi Itaehal and 
John M. RachsJ, of I'nlon; Mis* 
Julia Anderson, of 0.lnr Pslla 
Iowa; Mr. and Mra Mat L. Oritt 
ley, of Indianapolis; Mis* Alice 
Wsltoo snd Mr, fh»yd Ryle, of 
Krlanger: Mr. Hebert CrisW. of 



und family, of Union, und Misa 
Alma Bsker, of Covington. 



The many frlaads of Baq, Chan, 
Wilaoii. of Rabbit Hash, will be 
sorry to hear that he has loat 
hat eyesight entirely. His sight 
ha* Item falilag tor ansae time, 
hia dor tor gtvlaf him no 
j •peasant frasa taa first. 



Solon Ryle sold the tobacco he 
raised on four and one-half acres 
of land, for RjOi. 

The Ea-a He id W, M. S. met 
with Mrs. Charles Moore Thursday 
of last week. 

Leomer Louden an 1 Chsa MuntA 
each antertained (lie young i>eo- 
ple with u |>ait.. during the noll- 
daya. 

\V. J. Rodgca in I family sad 
Hii Banklnsoii spent New Yeaf*a 
day at etaulc) Stephens* naar 
Hu.lMigton. 

Jsnaa Wil 1 J II. Waitea 

each took eattl, to the CtaataV- 
natl n\aiat l.ial »wk by lh*> 
way of titi.ha 






■■■ 



M 



THURSDAY JAN. 8th, in JO 



wONB COUNTY SECONDER 



AMERICAN HORSES 
MAKE BSD SHOWING 



CREAT WAR FOUND US POORLY 

PREPARED IN ARTILLERY 

ANIMALS. 




tl— >i ip I ii <m i i ii r 



♦ UUUITY OF BLOOD COUNTS 



French Army Furnished the Thorough- 
breds that Enabled Our Guns to 
Stop Ludendorf's Drive Toward 
Paris and Victory. *■ 



If, iirter sovenry-nvp' ye'irs of ex 
haustive ;iinl convincing experimental 
tion, a work that had rust the great 
niili'uir.v powers af Continental Europe 
— Ifiissin. Ausrria. Hungary, tlie Ger- 
ii:;in Kutpirc, France and Italy — in the 
segregate a matter of $400,000,000 or 
$500,000,000, additional proof of the 
superlative value of thoroughbred 
blood in the military hoi .so anil the 
comparative wortLlessness of cold- 
Mood that proof was supplied by 
the experience of the Second Division 
of the American Expeditionary Po«m 
in the ft utuniet' of 11US. The Second 
1 Divfsion was the division In which t lie 
famous Marine Corps was brigaded. 
The Second was one of the host 
equipped of the American grand units 
us regards horseflesh. The cream of 
the remount service was in its artillery 
and transport departments. 

In June, ISHS, the Second Division 
was ordered from a quiet sector of the 
western front near Verdun to the 
western angle of the great Marne sa- 
lient the German offensive of March 
to June had created in the French line. 
Focli had sensed the impending I.u- 
denclorf thrust thut was to win Paris 
und a victorious peace, and he was 
assembling ajl his available soldiers 
to meet it. The currying out of this 
order by the Second Division involved 
a nym-h of less than 100 miles, 97 to 
be exact. Yet 80 per cent of the cold- 
blooded horses of the artillery brigade 
succumbed to the rigors of this more- 
date march without having come under 
gunfire. Upward of half the horses 
that dropped out of line were so com- 
pletely done up they were unfit to be 
sent to base stations for recuperation 
with the ultimate object of returning 
to service. 

The French divisions that accom- 
panied the American divisions on this 
inarch lost no more than five per cent 
of their horses. Hut the French artil- 
lery, cavalry and transport horses 
were half and three-quarter breds, 
the produce of a system of breeding 
rtiat had been Instituted by a fax- 
sighted government sixty or seventy 
years before the outbreak of the great 
war. 

Second Division Suffers. 
Because of the collapse of its horse 
equipment and artillery brigade of the 
Second Division did not reach its ob- 
jective until a day after the groat 
struggle that was to terminate in the 
whining appeal of the German army 
for an armistice in October had bejrun. 
The Second Division fought the first 
day without artillery protection and 
suffered outrageously in consequence. 
The artillery brigade reached the zone 
of conflict late in the second day and 
was enabled to take part In the series 
of actions that completely deranged 
Ludendorl's ambitious plan of conquest 
and put the great German army on the 
defensive only because American re- 
mount officers were able to re-equip 
It from the surplus horse supply of the 
French army with half and three- 
quarter breds. The French were in 
a position to furnish these indispensa- 
ble animals because up to the begin- 
:nlug of March the war Lad been a 
war of position rather than a war of 
movement and no hard demand had 
,been made on the artillery and cavalrv 
horse reserves of the French army. ' 
When the great war came to its un- 
expected finish the United Slates had 
under anus, at home and abroad, 
-s o m e -ifrfOfttJOO — sntrtters; — o f wh i ch 
074,000 were infantry, 304,00 were 
•engineers, (J89.000 were held artillery, 
■but only •_ > 9,000 were cavalry. The 
field artillery was hor-ed after a fash 
,lon. So was the engineer contingent; 
But the quality of the horses; that 
served ttie ttpld artillery awl the en- 
.gincer contingent generally was no 
better, if, indeed, it was as good, than 
was the quality of the horses that failed 
♦he artillery brigade of the Second 
Division in the march from Verdun to 
the Marne salient. 

Our Cavalry Not There. 
For such masses of infantry and 
Artillery there should have been 200.- 
ooo to s.to.ooo cavalry, according to the 
most advanced military opinion In the 
; United States and abroad. Yet only 
an Insignificant fraction of.the absimi 
ly small mounted contingent of the 
glgjintic military establishment of the 
United States of November 1st, IMS — 
the second, third, sixth and fifteenth 
cavalry regiments— was in France. 
Most of our 20,000 troopers were pa- 
trolling the Mexican frontier. More- 
over only a moiety of the so-called 
American cavalry forces In, France 
was mounted. At no time wdw it pos- 
sible to completely horse the Heeund, 
third, sixth mid fifteenth regiments! 
The tro»pers of these regiment <*, when 
they were not serving with machine 
gun conflngents, were guarding muni- 
tions and quartermaster's stores. Tills 
condition was due to the disgraceful 
fact Uiat Ihe Unlled Stales had no 
suitable mounts for its cavalry. France 
and Great Britain, to Insure prompt 
and effective co-operation by the 
American grand units In the great 
counter offensive of Focli might spare 
serviceable artillery horses of the half 
and three-quarter bred types because, 
as hid already been pointed out. the 
struggle for civilization up to the be 
ginning of 1018 on the western front 
had been for the most part a war of 
position rather than our of mtawtuer. 
Tholr re— rvee of artillery honam had 
not tot* exhausted Hut nslth.-r 
France nor Great Britain felt disputed 
to tfclp with nones the ctratry of en 
•nay that should haw i wmt it the eon 
•iict with the toM awMtatvd and h«*t 
jttatped candry la he round oa the 
••VAvt 



asr 



r- f 



WATCH FOR IMPORTED PESTS 

Little Excuse for Passing Stock In. 

fested With Ega Masses of Gipsy 

or Brown-Tail Moth. 

(Prepared by the Vnited States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 

The main arguments of objectors 
to plnnt quarantine No. 37, which will 
greatly restrict the entry of nursery 
stock and other plants and seeds, be- 
ginning June 1, 1019, are that either 
no pests are brought in on -such im- 
ported stock or that thorough inspec- 
tion abroad would eliminate any unde- 
sirable Insects. There Is no question 
but that the chief exporting foreign 
governments have given to their nur- 
sery stock the best Inspection which 
human skill and science can afford. 
Failures are«due to the human equa- 
tion and to conditions not subject to 
change, which make inspection and 
certification Insufficient safeguards. 

The Inadequacy of such Inspection 
since 1018, when it -became operative, 
Is shown by the findings resulting 
from reinspectlon of imported mate- 
rial at destination In this country. 
Data gathered by the United States 
department of agriculture show that 
there have been received from Hol- 
land 1,061 Infested shipments, Involv- 
ing 148 kinds of Insect pests; from 
Belgium 1,306 Infested shipments, In- 
volving G4 kinds of Insects; from 
France 347 infested shipments. Involv- 
ing 89 kinds of insects; from England 
154 infested shipments, Involving 62 
kinds of Insects; from Japan 291 In- 
fested shipments, Involving 108 kinds 
of insects; from Germany 12 infested 
shipments, involving 15 kinds of insect 
pests. Many of these Intercepted in- 
sects are not known to be established 
anywhere in this country, and num- 
bers of them, if established, would 
undoubtedly become important pests. 

Typical of the Insects thus Import- 
ed, some of which hnve come in on 
more than 1,000 shipments, are the 
records in relation to gipsy and 
brown-tail moths. 

Under the system of Inspection 
which has been established in the 
principal exporting countries there is 
little excuse for the passing and cer- 
tification of stock infested with the 
egg masses of the gipsy moth or with 
the lurge anil rather conspicuous leafy 
winter nests of the larvae of the 
brown-tail moth. In point of fact, 
however, during the period in which 
the highest possible grade of Inspec- 
tion has been enforced no less than 
52 different shipments of plants from 
foreign countries have been found to 
be infested with egg masses of the 
gipsy moth or larval nests of the 
brown-tali moth. Three of these were 
from Japan and the others were from 
France, Holland or Belgium. 

Unfortunately these records ,do not 
necessarily comprise the total entry 
of these two pests. They represent 
merely the Instances of Infestation 
discovered by reinspectlon qn this 
side. Under the law the inspection 
Of Imported nursery stock in this 




- - ' 



USE LABOR-SAVING METHODS 



Expensive Equipment Rarely 
Even on Large Poultry Farmi 
Some Practical Devices. 



Pays 




Imported Stock Ready for Plaoting. 

country Is left to the inspectors of the 
states, and the finding of infestation 
Is there entirely dependent on the ef- 
ficiency of state Inspection. In many 
states this inspection Is of a high or- 
der, and probably most If not all In- 
stances of Infestation are found. In 
other states the Inspection service is 
Inadequately provided for and Insuffi- 
cient, and In a few states the service 
has little support and little If any effi- 
ciency. There Is therefore the possi- 
bility that one or both of these pests 
have already gained foothold at one 
point or another in the United States 
and huve not yet been discovered and 
reported. In this connection It should 
be remembered that the gipsy mo th 
was 20 year* In Massachusetts before 
It was known. 

The establishment of these two In 
sects In different parts of the United 
States would soon lead to their gen 
•ral spread throughout the country. 
"That this would meun In cost and, 
•fls and also In human suffering 
hardly be aatlmstad Only a por- 
tion of the New Knglaud stated Is now 
lursdad by th«*«, Insects, WW | ytt tB# 
•Wrndltara la ritan ap sad ooairol 
■MP alas* amounts to mora thao « 
dollars a pear by iu« atatea 
>• addition to an sldtng 
spawotwiatlaa <rf upwards sf 
stmually 



can 



(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
meat of Agriculture.) 

Lanor-savlug methods can be uti- 
lized to better advantage on commer- 
cial poultry farms by careful planning 
of the arrangement of the buildings 
and by installing simple labor-saving 
devices. An expensive labor-saving 
equipment rarely pays even on Inrge 
poultry farms. 

Some of the practical devices are 
large dry-mash hoppers in which all 
the mash Is fed, the piping of water 
to be convenient to each house, and 
in a long house the installing of n 
simple trolley system to carry the feed 
and to be utilized In cleaning the 
house. If several houses are used they 
should be arranged to save steps. Suf- 
ficient yard space should be allowed 
to keep the ground in good condition. 
It is a serious mistake to allow only 
a very small amount of yard space and 
thereby overstock the land and pro- 
duce soil contamination. 

A practical und comparatively inex- 
pensive equipment consists of one or 
more long houses containing from 500 
to 1,000 hens arranged with double 
yards and kept only for the produc- 
tion of market eggs. The yards should; 
be from 100 to 150 feet deep and 
should be plowed and sowed frequent- 
ly to quick-growing crops to keep the 
land fresh. Such a house can be fitted 
with two large yards, one on each side, 
which reduces the expenses of parti- 
tions In the yards and also greatly fa- 
cilitates labor and cultivating the 




Barred Plymouth Rocks on Govern- 
ment Farm at Beltsville. 

yards. Considerable green feed can be 
grown Incidentally in keeping these 
yards fresh and Jn good condition. 

The use of mammoth Incubators ma- 
terially cuts down the labor necessary 
In batching large numbers of chickens, 

lng houses, or a hmall hot-water pipe 
system makes an economical brooding 
equipment and one which can be con- 
ducted successfully with a minimum 
amount of labor. The breeding stock 
under these .conditions should be kept 
in colony hoifses scattered over a con- 
siderable area, and if possible allowed 
free range, using their eggs for match- 
ing during the breeding season and 
keeping from 50 to 100 hens in each 
house. 

. On the average general farm the 
poultry does not receive sufficient care 
to produce the best results, but by 
better arrangement of • buildings and 
better methods fne same amount of 
poultry could be kept with the labor 
now being used and better results ob- 
tained, while In many cases the size 
of the flocks could be increased and 
greater profits realized for the labor 
required.. . . 

On commercial poultry farms care- 
ful planning of equipment will greatly 
reduce labor, but a very Intensive 
system Is detrimental to profitable re- 
sults with poultry. The danger hi 
often too great Intensification, wAlch 
white tem p orarily reducing labor does 
not provide' conditions under which 
poultry can be reproduced successfully 
with good results. 



TABLE SCRAPS FOR CHICKENS 



Poultry Fleck Peculiarly Adapted far 

Converting Wast* lata 

Nutritious Food. 

There la a certain amount of tabic 
•craps and kitchen wuatt Wtaloh baa 
trading value, hut which |f not fwd 
duds Ita way into Uto gasbags pall la 
•very a cy a i an dtf . a*> mat tar haw «oav 
iMMiirsj ib» totaassraf*. 

IHnsMry la the oftiy ctaaa of domestic 
Kiitirajts which «• suMsbu for convert- 
lag this watts' material, right where 
ti is produced in the city into whole- 
miui* sad satriiiusa fuvd la the 
at aggs and poultry 



(HAND 



S (X 






h 



Chandler Strides into 
Full Leadership 

IF there has ever been any question as to Chandler leadership of the 
medium-priced fine car field, it is answered now. The great Chandler 
Six is sweeping its market. It displaces less efficient cars. It steps in to 
serve those who previously have chosen only high-priced cars. And it 
pleases everywhere. 

From two thousand to three thousand discriminating Americans bought 
Chandler cars— open and closed— every month this Fall. And at no time 
has the demand been fully met. Thousands have waited months for their 
new Chandlers, and have felt repaid for waiting. 

Nothing could more clearly show the regard in which America holds the 
Chandler Six, than the patience with which these thousands waited for 
weeks and months for their Chandlers. They waited because they knew 
what they were waiting for— because they knew it was worth waiting for. 

If You Don't Want to Wait 
Next Spring, Order Now 

SIX SPLENDID BODY TYPES 

Seven-Passenger Touring Car, $1895 Four-Passenger Roadster, $1895 

Four-Passenger Dispatch Car, $1975 
Seven-Passenger Sedan, $2895 Four-Passenger Coupe, $2795 Limousine, $3395 

Ail prices f. o. b. Cleveland 

S. O. SCHANKER v . 

Erlanger, Ky. 

CHANDLER" MOTOR CAR COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO 



'A 



i 




■M 



aSttro 



do Hog Ration 



=5=fe 



Both Phohss — 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 
Boone House, 

BURUNOTON, a KY. 

Prompt Attention to all Calls. 




UNTIL you, feed Tuxedo Hog Ra- 
tion you cannot know how cheap- 
ly pork can be developed. Tuxedo is 
a quick fattener — a never-failing pro- 
ducer of live, sturdy* good .looking 
hogs. The formula is compounded 
along lines suggested by a prominent 
State Experiment Station Official. 

Note of what Tuxedo Hog Ration is made, 
and you will understand why it is so very 
nutritious: Digester Tankage, Corn Meal, 
Ground Barley, Ground Oats, Wheat Mid- 
dlings, Old Process Oil Meal, Gluten Feed, 
Alfalfa Meal. 

This balanced mixture is sweetened with 
Cane Molasses. 



It! 



AKTAT VCTQ . PROTEIN 14.5%: FIBRE 7% 
AIM AL X OlO . CARBOHYDRATES 55%: PAT 3.5% 

Made by the Manufacturers of Tuxedo Chop, Ce-re-a-lia 
Sweets, Tuxedo Scratch, Ce-re-a-lia Egg Mash 

•See Your Nearest Dealer 

FOR SALE BY 
A. DOLW1CK, Constance. JACK BERKSHIRE, Petersburg. 

M. L. CRUTCHER. Hebron. A F. MILNER, Constance. 

GULLEY A PETIT, Burlington. '. H. MANNIN, Hebron. 

STAflStfER & POWERS. Walter / 



A. E., FOSTER & SON 

FARM SALESMEN AND 

LICENSED AUCTIONEERS 

No. 3 PMtt St, Covington, Ky. 

Will be pleaavsd to talk over with you, cither the talc . 
or purchase of farm property 



FOR SALE 

A $200 Piano Player, Mahogany 
finish, In excellent condition, can be 
used on any style piano, sod about 
80 music rolls. Would make a fine 
Christmas present. Price, WO. 
MRS. W. M. COBEY, 

Phone 2X Erlanger, Ity. 



BULL CALVES FOR SALE. 

I, 

High Grade Holstein Bull Calves, 
aired by Registered Bull, ontof good 

producing dams. 

THEO, CAPEKTER A SONS, 
R. D. 2, Walton, Ky. 
Both 'phones. odec26 

• > VV> *< VVVVS*AAA<WVWSrV*VWV»a 



Ship by Truck 

We are again in position 
to do your general truck- 
ing — tobacco and live- 
stock a specialty. 




Florence, Kj. 

Consolidate Pbone: 
Burlington 117. 



o-dHc-ie 



DO YOU.tAK» TH1 KlCOftD£t? 

Try It One Ytwr - You'll Life* Jt 



Attention lute QwnersI 

mmmmmmmm 

I am prepared to do first-class 

repairing on all makes or cars. 

Starter and generator work a 

specialty, AH work guaranteed. 

QWm me a trial. 

Earl M. Ay lor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 

»♦»♦»♦»» » ♦♦»»++»♦♦*'♦♦»»»♦♦ 

Raw Furs Wanted 

Hifhsst Pricsa m*4 3U«4*rd 
HEIUUfcT JUftitV 
BarUnftoaj, Ky. 




i 



i 




Vol. xxxxv 



COUNTY RECORDER. 



Riablished 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY JANUARY 15, 1920 



$1.50 Per I ear 



No 16 



TRUST COMPANIES OF 

THE UN1TB STATES 

Resources for 1819 Show a Big 
Inoroaoo Oover Last Year. 



Kentucky Trust Co. resources at 
the close of business Juno 30 were 
in excess of $83,000,000, according 
to «T>u*t Companies of 41m, Unti- 
ed States,'' just published by the 
United States Mortgage & Trust 
Company, of New York. The total 
figures /or the state are 105,198,- 
641, a gain of $11,417,354, or about 
21 per cent over last year. 

The Trust Company resources of 
the United States increased near- 
ly 19 per cent and aggregate $11,- 
150,446,087, which is considerably 
in excess of the total banking 
strength of the country less than 
twenty years ago. 

John W. Platten, President of 
the United States Mortgage and 
Trust Company, in reviewing the 
past year's activities, says: 

"This, the 17th, edition of "Trust 
Companies of the United State*,' 
and the first to be issued after 
the close of the war, provides 



MARTW C. WEAVER DEAD. 



Martin C Weaver, 66, a highly 
respected citizen of Sale Creek, I-----*-, 
Tennessee, and formerly of Un~ HBPtTUIlH DUSH108S DlSpOSOd 



low, Boone county, Ky., died at his 
home Sunday night, Jan. 4th, 1820, 
at 11 o'clock, after a brief ill— 
MM 

He was a trusted and valued 
employe of the C. N. O. & T. P. 
Railway Company as station agent 
and telegraph operator for a per- 
iod of 33 years. 

Ho is survived by his wife, one 
son ar.d »r.o daughler, Harry, or 
Soddy, and Mrs. Ernest Chauncy, 
of Sale Creek ; two brothers, Lewi* 
of Georgetown, and Joe. of Union, 
Ky., and six grandchildren. 

He was a loving, kind and af- 
fectionate husband and father and 
always had a pleasant word ana 
smile for all whom he met 

He was a man to be admired 
for honor, uprightness and purity 
of character, and few people have 
had more friends 

He had been failing mentally 
and physically ever since his old- 
est daughter, Mrs. Annie Miller, 
died a year ago with fly, 
Three months ago her husband, 
Dr. Miller was laid to rest, leav- 
ing four children to the care of 
grandfather and grandmother. 

Martin Weaver had a great 
dread of a lingering illness, and 



FISCAL COURT NEWS. 



re- 



an appropriate medium for brief becoming a care, so the Lord 
mention of the aehievetmelnts of I called him home Just a few hours 

after he was taken sick. 

The funeral services were hold 
at ihe Welsh Union church at 
Sale Creek Tuesday morning, con- 
dutced by Rev. George A. Gay of 
the Universallst church of Chatt- 
anooga. The body was laid to rest 
at the Buttram cemetery near Day 
ton. The active pallbearers were 
T. C. Blackwell, Oakdale; W. H; 
Crow, Soddy; Dr. A. W. Gross, 
Sale Creek; W. A. McDonald, Sod- 
dy; Howell Davis, and Harry Ken- 
nedy, Sale Creek Honary pall- 
bearers, J. H Mahoney, W. Mi Er- 
vin, David Summers, T. W. Card- 



the Trust Companies in their 
lation to the great conflict. 

"When this Country actively 
entered upon hostilities the Trust 
Companies responded with prompt 
decision and patriotism to the 
needs of the hour. Contributing 
very largely on their own account 
to the success of the five great 
Loans, they exerted a powerful 
influence upon their clients and 
friends to the further great as- 
sistance of the Government. Their 
support of other war measures 
was likewise of inestimable and 

immediate value, as was also 2_f, u ™} " a f m ™ * l - 
their cooperation in the distri- WeU and £ L .Farmer 
bution of War Savings Stamps 
and the encouragement of a pol- 
icy of Thrift. 

The impressive total of $11,- 
150,446,000 Trust Co. reaources for 
1919, a gain of $1,769,560,000 or 18 8 
per cent over last year, is a most 

f gratifying evidence of growth, af- 
ording as it does fresh poor of 
the spirit with which the Trust 
Companies have met the increas- 
ing responsibilities placed upon 
them and assurance of continued 
healthy progress in strength and 
Influence." 



Mrs. Dora Bannister, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 



DR. W. ED GRANT. 



NATION OF HYP0CRITS? 

National Dry Test . Will Come In 
Submission To Law. 

With the Supreme Court's de- 
cision upholding tho constitution- 
ality of the Volstead prohibition 
enforcement act passed the last 
hope of those who had dreamed 
of again partaking of "beer, wine 
or other intoxicating liquors'* in 
places other than their own homes 
or in the homes of friends. The 
decision was six to three. Wo 
agree with Justice McReynolds, 
who said that the 18th Amend- 
ment had not yet come into ef- 
fect and that the Federal Gov-* 
eminent had no general power to 
prohibit the manufacture and sale 
of liquor, and that the war em- 
ergency under which national pro- 
hibition was made effective and 
passed. However, we also believe 
in the finality of the Supreme 
Court and the legality of the 
procedure by which the Eigh- 
teenth Amendment was accom- 
plished. We do not believe that 



lyoulsvllli' Kvonlni* I'ost. 
Funeral services will be held 
at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon for 
Dr. W. Ed. Grant, wide known 
physician, who died at 2:30o'cfock 
Saturday afternoon while driving 
with his wife in his automobile 
The services, which will be pri- 
vate, will be held from the resi- 
dence, 2221 Douglas boulevard, 
and burial will be in Cave Hill 
cemetery. 

The sudden death of D:\ Grant, 
which occurred on Third Street, 
near Avery, when he suffered a 
heart attack, closes a career of 
distinguished services to his pro- 
fession and the community. His 
opportunity to be of speciaf ser- 
vice to the latter was afforded 
as City Health Officer from 1909 
to 1917. 

As he collapsed at the wheel, 
Mrs. Grant stopped the ear and 
then summoned his brother, Dr. 
H. H. Grant, and the body was 
removed to the homo on Douglas 
boulevard. 

Dr. Grant was born in Septem- 
ber, 1845, and came from Boone 
county to Louisville in 1885. His 
father, Dr. E. L. Grant, was a 
prominent physician. He was edu- 
cated in medicine in Miami Uni- 
versity and the Jefferson Medical 
College. 
He was dean of the medicaf do- 

£ art men t of the University of 
ouiaville from 1911 to 1914. For 
thirty years he was examiner for 
the New York Life Insurance Co. 
and 



Of at the regular Janu- 
ary Term. 

At a regular term of the Boone 
Fiscal Court held Tuesday, Janu- 
ary 6th. 1920, Judge N. R. Riddell 
presided and Justices Stephens, 
Aylor, Wilson, N. C. Tanner, .r. Ck 
DedLrger ana" rT. li. Tanner, were 
present. 

Duke Wilso.i, of Walton, was 
released from paying $2,50 tax er- 
roneously assessed. 

John M. Lassing, commissioner, 
filed settlement with Sheriff L. 
A. Conner, and was allowed $100 
for making settlement. 

C. A. Fowler was allowed $8.90 
per bill rendered. 

D. R. Blyth was 
for goods furnish 

Charles West bay 
$21.80 for coal furnished the coun 

ty. 

Chas. Maurer was allowed $15.85 
clerk's cost in suit of County At- 
torney against Boone county 

L. A. Conner allowed $2.50 taxes 
refunded Duke Wilson. 

Nancy Graves allowed $100 for 
taking care of Malinda Reynolds, 
a pauper to be paid quarterly 

R. O. Hughes allowed $25 for 
superintending the construction 
of one-half mile of pike on Rich- 
wood grade. 

County Road Bonds redeemed to 
this date be burnt. 

Ordered that $20,000 in road 
bonds be redeemed. 

Sheriff directed to pay road 
bonds out of general road funds 
until further ordered. 

Ordered that road bonds be ad- 
vertised for salt and that bids 
be received by this court at its 
next term. 

F. H. Rouse was employed as 
superintendent of the County In- 
firmary at a salary of $500 per 
year, the county to haul the 
coal. 

The County Attorney Is direct- 
ed to prosecute the case of Town 
tof Verona to dissolve Its chartrr, 
to the Court of Appeals. 

The pauper practice In the sev- 
eral precincts In the county was 
let out as follows : 

Petersburg— J. M. Grant. 

Walton— G. C. Rankin. 

Verona— J. F. McCormic. 

Union— O. E. Senour. 

Bullittsville— S. B. Nunnelly 

Constance— A. A. Murat 

Belleview— 

Florence — 

Carlton-I E. Carlyle 

Hamilton— R. E. Ryle. 

Beaver— R. E. Ryle. 

Burlington— 

The report of F H. Rouse, Sup- 
erintendent of the County Infir- 
mary, Shows that for 1919 there 
were an average 21.4 Inmates, 
which were cared for at a cost 
of $3,752.79, an average of S175.il 
per iiunate. January 1, 1920, there 
19 inmates being cared for. 



Brings Nows From Old Homes. 

Renewing her subscription, Mrs 
Anna Daugherty, of Melvern, Kan 
sas, writes.: "Your paper l<* like a 
letter from my Old Ky. Home. We 
had a month of cold weather but 
the rest of the winter has been 
pleasant Plenty of feed this win- 
ter but water Is scarce, most 
everybody is hauling for stock. 
We have had showers but not 
enough to make water— haven't 



EXCERPTS 



From Speeches Marie on Jack- 
son Day By Prominent 
Democratic Leaders. 



Excerpts fronj the Jackson Day 

speeches made by prominent Dera- 

had a good rain since the 9th of ; ocratic leaders at the. meeti^ 

last July. i*he price of land here lfi e \fi in Washington, D. C, on the 

is advancing fast. Mr. Daugherty 8th inst. : 

and I send our best regards to' Cox, governor of Ohio- "\ co> 
all old Boone county friends ana i spiring band of men seated in the 
hope to make a visit back there! United States Senate, stood out a, 
in t he future. self-appointed spokesmen of th?i 

„ _ , , I countrymen. The action they pro- 

Renewing her subscription to I vented held the affairs of nations 
the Recorder Mrs. J W Kelly, of everywhere disjointed and impo- 
Columbus, Ind., writes: "I enjoy , tent. And why? In orde ■• thit th- 
reading the Recorder as I get ! sorrows of mankind couU mulli- 
>■ allowed SHS2I n e neW8 /' 0m u my Old Kentucky j^iy and then be charge! to Chi 
chI the countv Hom ° *r * M* h y , ou aM a I'"*" >an *-hose chief offense is the 
iy was an u wedf porouft NeW ***** •*"*■• ht ' »»» rendered and the 



• Mrs. R. N. Utz, of Valley Falls, 
Kansas, remitting for her Re- 
corder, writes: * Sickness a no 
death in the family caus-.'d me to 
neglect my correspondence We 
had a whi.e Christmas an J have 
had very cold weather — the 
ground is white now.'' 



HEART TO HEART TALK 



was its chief local medical 
absolute prohibition Vas Tustified i of fice T, for fifteen years. He haa 
it represented the ma- ? ery ed as president of the Amer- 
ican Association of Medical Exam- 



or that 
jority opinion. 

But that is not the issue that 
is now involved. We have prohibi- 
tion, and that prohibition is legal 
according to the highest court in 
the land. Now let us see what the 
results will be. The horrors of 
wood alcohol have been Increased 
upon the country. Now the ques 
tion will be whether we are to 
become a nation of hypocritea 
and continue to take nips on the 
sly or whether the nation will 
submit. Tolerance of bootlegging 
will soon be worn out and the 
country will then take a stand- 
either for reasonably lenient pro- 
hibition or for a stringent en- 
forcement.— Buffalo Express. 



Record on Five Cows. 



J. E. Yelton, of near Mt. Am 
burn, does not claim to be ati 
expert dairyman, but he wishes 



iners. 

He devoted a groat deal of his 
time to productive study of the 
prevention and treatment of dis- 
ease, winning recognition from 
many physicians and health offi- 
cers in the country. 

Dr. Grant was twice married, his 
first wife being Miss Anna Graves, 
of Boone county, who died . in 
1883. His marriage to Miss Mary 
Burnett was in 1893. 

Dr. Henry E. Tuley, of the Un- 
iversity of LouiBvllle, announced 
this morning "In respect to the 
late Dr. W. Ed. Grant, formerly 
dean of the medical department 
of the University of Louisville, 
there will be no lectures today.'' 

Dr. Grant is survived by his wid- 
ow Mrs Mary Burnett Grant, 
daughter of the late Judge Thos. 
L. Burnett; one brother, Dr. 11. 
H. Grant; a nephew, Dr. Owsley 
Grant, Lou'svIHe, and three nieces 



to show our readers what Is pos- | Jj!. R 8 ft" 1 ^ 8 , G £ n ^ BO ° w«7T nt & : 
sible with five cows From JaViu- & S . i & JT\h S ^ Cr ~™°l c]h ™ 



J 



ary 1, 1919, to January 1, 1920, ho 
sold from live cows 'y60-l.05 worth 
of cream, three calves for 160, and 
has two calves left which he vaH 
ues at $50. He raised nine shouts 
for his own moat, which were 
worth at feeding time $100 These 
cows are Just common grade stuff. 
He is not boasting of what he 
has d one, but he want* to show 
what any one can do « ith a herd 
of five cows He is placing a low 
estimate on the stock hi* haB left. 
The lowest price ho received for 
U 5-gailon can of cream waaJSHfi, 
and the highest price was $16.35. 
Who can boat this recordt - Fal- 
mouth Outlook. 

The effort to rah" ten thous- 
tutd dollar* with which to pm- 

oheeo a site* erect and equip u 

town hall, is meeting wph a lib- 
eral response In the matter of 

money sub (Ml hull 

wiih lodge .milt be 

■ gient > •- thai wouM 

*dd I . the m w ( III* 

town 



Va, ; and Mrs. Flvin Curry, Los 
Angeles. 

E. K. Stephens and Jis. D. Acra 
each have a considerable sale of 
personal property adv ertised this 
week. Mr Acra will move about 
the first of March to the, pro 



Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D. 
Draw your chair up very close 
ot mine, now, for this is to be 
as never before, truly "a heart to 
heart talk.'' I want to talk to 
you, beloved, about the promises 
of our God. Peter calls them 
"the exceedingly great and prec- 
ious promises. 1 ' Every reader of 
the Bible must mark how much of 
it is devoted to recording thet 
many and varied promises of God 
They are many and varied. They 
take a wide range and are suited 
to every class of needy and suf- 
fering beings. From childhood to 
old age, to the burdened -and the 
tried. They are promises to the 
weak who may take refuge in the 
divine strength All who seek af- 
ter God are assured that they 
shall not seek him in vain. These 
promises are many. Let us recall 
some that are within our hearts 
and have been tested in c— • * N»/ 
"I will surely dp thee good.'' Je- 
hovah said to to Jacob. It Is a 
promise juBt as much for every 
child of God. It belongs to you. 
All things work together for good 
to them that love God, and has 
brought peace to hundreds of tried 
and perplexed souls. *'My grace Is 
sufficient for thee,'' has been 
the stay and comfort of many a 
burdened and distressed heart 
"Thou wilt keep him in perfect 
peace whose mind is stayed on 
thee,'' should keep us true and 
steadfast amid life's changing con 
1 ditiona. "The Joy of the Lord is 
( your strength," supports us in our 
weakness and need. "Eye hath 
not seen or ear heard, neither 
hath it entered the fieart or 
man the things which God hath 
prepared for them that love him'' 
gives us a foretaste of the jov* 
beyond life's fleeting day Amid 
j our sufferings it is sweet to Je- 
1 member that "These light affH>- 
1 tions which are but for a moment attached 



Billy Sunday in Nashville. 

Here are some things Billy Sun- 
day said in Nashville the other 
day: 

"Many women are perfectly sat- 
isfied if only the old ma a is able 
to come across every tine they 
want a new dress, and b:> abfevbo 
trade the old auto off for a new 
ore. They wouldn't care ifhodied 
and went to hell tonight, pro- 
vided he left plenty of insurance 
money.'' 

"We have got boys out of knee 
pants who know more about sin 
than Methuselah did at 969 years 
of age. And plenty of Utile frowsy 
headed, gum • chewing, rag-time 
singing girls, who can't turn a 
flaj>-pck on the baker without 
spattering dough all over th? 
kitchen, who knows more of si i 
(ban their grandmothers did at 
eighty.'' 

"Don't jimmy elbows with the 
other fellow to s?e how much you 
can get out of him! Help him'.' 

"I was born in the backwoods. 
I wore a coonskin cap, drank cof- 
fee from my saucer, ate peas with 
a knife' I am a graduate of the 
school of povertv and hard 
knocks. My father enlisted in the 
Union army before I was born, 
and was killed in battle. The his- 
tory of my home life is compris- 
ed in Gray's eight words— "The 
short and simple annals of the 
poor." 

Most touch ingly he described 
the death of his mother and the 
carrying of her body back to the 
old tamiiy burying ground "be- 
neath the trees where she had 
played as a little girl, and 1 
had rompted as a thoughicss 
boy," as he phrased It. "Memory 
returned," he went on. "Once more 
I saw the scenes of my childhood. 
I heard mother cafl us to supper. 
I saw her puU out theold trun- 
dle bed. And the boys knelt at 
her knee with clasped hands and 
said : "Now I law me down to 
sleep." 

"Can I forget her? Aye when 
the flower forgets the sun 



gratitude he has won from man- 
kind.'' 

McAdoo, former secretary ol the 
treasury: "Republican leadership 
has demonstrated startling inca- 
pacity to deal with the problems 
confronting America We must 
keep up the fi^ht for the prompt 
restoration of peace thruout the 
world." 

Pomerene, U. S. So-nator fr >m 
Ohio: "Altho there are provis- 
ions in the treaty I n?ver liked, 
I am one of those who prefer 
ratification without amendment 
because of the necessity for 
prompt action Personally I bc-< 
lieve the American voters demand 
ratification and they are not 
going to split hairs "about reser- 
vations.'' 

Palmer, attorney general : "The 
part Republican leaders have chns 
en to play has been merely to 
criticize our methods, "xMittle our 
achievements, investigate our vir;- 
tori?s and rob America and the 
world of their fruits. Let them 
stand upon their record.'' 

Clark, Democratic leader of th<> 
House: "In the impending cam- 
paign we stand on our splendid 
and unimpeachable record in peace 
and war, for it is wise, progres- 
sive and patriotic. In the last 
six years mo-.-e constructive legis- 
lation was placed on the statute 
books than was put there in 24 
years of Republican controf.'' 

Cornwell, governor of West Vi- 
ginia: "As Democrats our chief 
ground of antagonism to the Re- 
publican party has been that it 
was a class party, a party of 
special privileges, dominated by 
business, it legislated exclusive- 
ly and persistently in its inter- 
est." 



WILSON-BRYAN SPLIT. 

President Wilson says: 

"I do not accept the action of 
the Senate of the United States 
as ; the decision of the nation." 

There can be no reasonable ob- 
jection to interpretations acootn- 
panying the act of ratification it- 
self But when the treaty is act- 
ed upon I must know whether it 
means that we have ratified or 
rejected it."* 

^>Ve cannot rewrite this treaty. 
We must take it without changes 
which alter ics meaning, or leave 
it, and then, after the rest of 
the world has signed it, we must 
face the unthinkable task of mak- 
ing another and separate kind of 
treaty with Germiny.'* 

"The clear and single way out 
is to submit it fo- determination^ 
at the next election, to the vot- 
ers of the nation, to give to the 
next election the form of a great 
and solemn refe r en dum.'' 

Mr. Bryan says: 

"\V\' cannot afford, either as 
citizens or as members of the par- 
ty, to share with the Republican 
party responsibility for further 
delay (of peace); we cannot go be- 
fore the country on the isaim 
which such an appeal would ore- 
sent." 

"The Republicans have a major- 
ity in the Senate, and therefore 
by right -in dictate the Senate's 
course." 

*Thn> one fundamental principle 
of democracy is the right of the 
majoilty to rul- It applies to the 
Senate and to the House, as well 
as to the public" 

"i assume that the party will 
accept prohibition as the perma- 
nent policy of the country." 

"T^issume thai the party wBl 
accept woman suffrage also as 
an accepted fact. The women sav- 
ed our party from defeat In the , 
last election, and wr need their 
aid to hasten the triumphs of 
every righteous cause'* 

"We ha»'e bocome the world's 
teacher in the science of govern- 
ment." 



ABOLISHED THE OFFICE 

And C. W. Goodridge Will Go 
to Another Field. 



The Fiscal Court in session Tues 
day voted to abolish the office 
of County Road Engineer and C. 
W. Goodridge, who has been serv- 
ing in that capacity since fast Au- 
Sust, left with his wife yeste|v 
ay for his old home in Buone 
county. After spending a few days 
there Mr. Goodridge will accept 
one of several positions that have 
been offered him by other coun- 
ties in the State. 

The court was almost unanimous 



Daniels seeretarv r»f fh» naw *" its act ion Only one member, 
claration of independence ano 1 15*%™!$$* opposed abolidung 



LineoloVB emancipation proclama- i ln f. tf 
tk>n glorify American statesman- ' 



Goodridge is said to be an 



ship, "the covenant of the League |S?Sft capable road man, hav- 
of Nations will bring free nations I £3SJ h ?f » ome l ei * ht £3* or more 
into such accord that reason, and JSf^JSeJ^atas? "^ 
not force, wUl rule among nations > fr 2, m the °° unt y of J 2 * 1 * f» y«*r. 
as among individuals' * nanons | There are many who beueve 
* ___ the court is making a serious er- 

Hitchcock, senator from Neb r as- ! r< ? r to dispensing with a road eo- 
ka: "If Republican leaders deal?? , fK°State 

improve their road sys- 



STEALING BOOZE. 



Louisville, Jan. 11.— A plot to 
smuggle S400.000 worth of whisk v 
out of a Louisville bonded ware- 
house to Cincinnati was bared be- 
fore sunrise this morning by the 
seizure of a truck containing 
100 cases at Versailles, Ky Anoth- 
er truck, containing more than 
150 cases, is believed to have leach 
ed its destination 



lie, the Democrats "are ready to ' ? n ^ ee !j- ^"fL 4 *,! 8 bo i^' ed ' * h ^ 
take it up. IX the test conies 



this campaign on that issue 
will win." 



in 



to throw down the gauntlet for a j * h€ \ St f ate . that are 'making an ef- 
thnti finish fic-ht on the. T^nime «r v, I fort to improve their road sys- 

SSTtft w .?. e ? SS -ESSr fc'SSS l SK£-.fi% I £K B "JK:it«- ■««* «- »* -«»<»« •» 

when reason flees the mind, an<i 
love dies in the human soul. 

"I have wandered farin thewavs 
of sin. I have stretched the elas- 
tic bands of that mother's fove 
until It seemed one step more 
and they must break. But, thank 
God, I never took that step" 



Warning to Spenders. 



Some very high-class stores con- 
fess that their best customers 
are beginning to restrict their 
expenditures. One fashionable jew- 
elry shop admits that its busi- 
ness has falelnoff distinctly. The 
tobacconist in one of New York's 
prominent hotels states that he 



sooner or later the local court 
w ill recognize its mistake. Certain* 
j fy some competent engineer, some 
one with practical exp?rience, 
should direct the work on the 
roads, otherwise the expenditure 
of the thousands of dollars that 
will go on the roads in the next 
year or two, will, to a great 
extent, be lost to the people.— 
Lebanon Enterprise, Jan. 9th. 



» Bad Day for Sale. 

Hanna & Robinson struck about 
is selling fewer boxes of expeo- I the worst day of the season for 
sive cigars. A clothing house ca- ' a public sale, but quite a good 
tering to well-to-do customers is | crowd was in attendance notwith- 
finding that its $100 suits are in standing the inclement weather, 
less demand. The curtailment inyLive stock did not bring the high 
expenditures appears to be set- , prices that have prevailed at oth- 
ting in near the top, but there «>r sales in this neighborhood the 
The arrest of two negro drivers ' are occasional reports of a similar past two months. Mr Robinson 

of the truck and their helpers incipient trend lower down. This j has moved to Louisville, where 

brings the total now held as i development should not create | he haa employment in a brokers 

suspects in liquor robberies to sev | alarm ; rather should it be wel- ' office where ho worked hereto- 

en. One suspect is a physician corned, for were the tide of reck- fore. Messrs. Hanna St Robinson 

hive were held following robbery • less expenditures to proceed un- 

of a warehouse at Bardstown ' checked for many more months 

near here, where $150,000 worth of the consequences could not fail to 

liquor was stolen when thedoors.be upsetting all around It is 

it is said, were left unlocked j in the Interest of all that con- 

viu?.™ 08 *• c ' oona&s » Federaf Pro- ( sumption of luxuries ease up for 

hibition officer for Kentucky, has the present, that prices move 
mP n char »* e °' the Investigation 'down toward more normal levels, 
The negro drivers assert they and that the saving and prudent 

were hired by a transfer com- investing of money increase 



express themselves as very well 
satisfied with their sale. 



tne nrat or March to tin pro|.-» ■« wukiik «,» S. - T . iT I ^7°?° IO cn '* cas«'S. •'* ^ w 
erty in Burlington he pure luiseu nN> ^ g ?| Ut J 0r u ? a f a fm ort ; . quired bv law, •■!!.. > the usual About ae 
of 6. C. Roberts Pwc«" 'exceeding and eternal weight of bottle^m-bond stamp is over the seeft in this 
glory." Paul seeing the things b<>- ; mouth of the bottle «•'» H>nt w 



Wont Give Him Up. 

F. H. Rouae, who took charge ot 
the County Infirmary the first of 
January, 1911, has had charge of 
that institution continuously ev- 
er since, and was reappoint ed by 
f any o ■ 3£ to th( * ^rc* 0118 *" of America has been Indulging in a , the fiscal court as its session on 
the R. E. Wathen Co where the spending jamboree. The time has i Tuesday of last week It is under 
doors were unlock"d, in 1 load the come to sober up.— Forbes Maga- stood that there were two other 
whisky, at oi<rht o'clock last night zine applicants for the position this 

The whisky is being held at Ver-I m. 

ps. No tax-paid stamps are \ A U§ saw Sleet 



to the cases. 



s heavy a sleet as Is 



pplicants for the positi 
year, but Mr. Rouse's manage- 
ment of the infirmary has bt'eai 
so satisfactory to the court that 
j it would not turn him down, h-it 



DELCO-LIGHT 

The coniplot* Electric Light and 
Power Plant 

hihi'lilc HhIiI Hint |Kiwi>r for knit Hi tin 
>i>ti me sayiof ft>i- poet n^tit. 



« hich covered the face 

;__.., yond, eould say: "I reckon (hat The second t u -\ became sep- of the earth and burdened trees 

the sufferings of this present lime 'rrated at Frankfort from the ono i ih ' u,,l Jf r . v . »»<» telephone wires 



is part of the country ' rather give him a small Increase 




fare rest worthy to bo compared I held at Versatile* when the latter | l*«t Friday morning The 



in salary ami retain him 



FKANK 



A. AVI KtlttCK, 

i i«m r, 

-VlUgtfl. 



rfOTICE Ml members of the 
ice Florence Mill: I'rodu -is Wsoeia- 
\Mth the glory which shall be re- took the wrmr; read \ search la that covered the st.-eots and side- 1 tion are hereby reouested to be 
V I have Imv.mi vn„ thn m «w |»«»fcT mnde fo- th > s^on-l truck, i »'«"w «'«* iou ; rh which did not ! present at a nvo.la, of the A*. 
«rlm,,«rof K lhe ,,,^miJ.i JiZtt £* ^"^''"v *'»'», by' it maj interfere with the movements of soeUtlojtat Florence Town Hall. 
glimpse of the piomiset of ^ Ood have reached its destination. I" destrians as some other sleeU s dunlav, Januirs ITih i«0 at 

Ihey arc many and suited to ov- Th> traoksi we-, to be met SI M»t so heavy have done Many, t •;, , ,, ,„ The eVefiXl ofoflK 
e-ry need l'he> are ;»ade sure the Covington bridge by a man I limbs were broken from the' 
to all who are in Christ Jesus who was to dirwot them to the • trees about town and the tele- 



Study them, team Ih-mby he^rt, 
claim them in prayer S'in fin t 
peace and joy In tliem tiotl bloat 

( num. Ky. 

• rganfleld The Unl 
Fnrm Hurenu with 
was uigaiihini m it 
A R Long si 



proper address In Cincinnati, ac- 
cording to the negro driver*. 

It If Wathoe, or the It I 
Wathen Or declared, ronl-rht that 
I he liquor w ih sent to l tiniiwi it i 
for *'tned|rln a I pur nonet » 



esent Incite itkHM 
lnj__ra « ill bo er ' 



r ■ tr-vfrnt 
at Park 
•I i lag 



phone service was hit hard In 
Home places, th*« poles and lines 
htuiig broke 



sera 
nest 
ing. 



m lie- i-ii ■ 
and other im i •«»! > 
will com this 



bu -I - 
meet - 



,011 



William Walton's fUvver tui 
turtle with him twice during 
of the sleety day* Inat vooa 
rely lie eseaoed Injury nn<t 
mat hinn wu damaged only 
•lightly 



CL8M hi: \im.L 
i M li > 



Kii..,il Smith mid hi 
oa the W «it>,i market 



•ale. h 



• >a 
at 

roeesss* 



mk 



iMi 



THURSDAY JAN. 16, 1920 



BOONE COUNTY RKCOKDtK 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

1 WALTON. ♦ 

5 .* ♦ 



John E. Williams of CoviJrgton, 
was a visitor here and tu his 
farm near Richwood Sunday. 

J. W. Fitzgerald of Danville, was 
the guest of his daughter Mrs. R. 
L. Shirley and family a - par.t of 
last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest DeMoiaey 
and Mr. and Mrs. Steiner of Lud- 
low, were the guests of Mrs. Mary 
Fields Sunday. 

J. S. Ballard of Charleston, W. 
Va , who has been here on a vlait 
to his brother T. O. Ballard ana 
wife, returned homo last week. 

Mrs. D. B. Wallace returned last 
Thursday from a very pleasant 
visit to her brother Dr. O. A. 
Mottier and wife of Indianapolis. 
ftevr I>r. W. W, Evans who r&- 
cently went to Oakland, Cala., 
writes that he arrived safely ana 
is enjoying the delightful weather 
there. 

Miss Jane Dickey who has been 
here a couple of months on ac-» 
count of illness was able to re- 
turn to her school work at Fay- 
etteville, Arkansas, this week. 

Married— 1'aui W. Bowling of 
Pendleton county, and Miss Lillii? 
May Norman at Jeffersonville, In- 
diana. The bride is a daughter of 
Wm. B. Norman of Walton. 

Jesse Laws who recentfy return 
od from Australia where he has 
been the past seven years, spent 
last week here with his. brother 
Dudley O. Laws ami family. 

Ernest \V. McEL-oy, who has 
been employed in Cincinnati came 
home here "last week to rent up as 
his physician directed that he 
would be benefitted and avoid a 
nervous breakdown. 

Mrs. Bluford W. Aylor, of Clran- 
din, North Dakota, spent last weCK 
here and loft Saturday for Tampa, 
Florida, to spend the winter. Mr. 
Aylor is expected here in a couple 
of weeks on a visit. 

McClure Chapter Royal Arch Ma 
sons will have its regular com- 
munication Friday night, Jan. 16, 
when there will be work in the 
degrees. All of the Companions 
are urged to be present. 

Mrs. Gertrude Gardt who has 
been visiting here left Friday for 
Cincinnati on a visit to friends 
and will then return to her home 
at Newark, Ohio. Her cousin E. 
Bruce Wallace accompanied her 
to Cincinnati for a couple of days' 
visit. 

R. A. Poland, of Owen~co., was 
here Monday consulting John L. 
Vest about some law business. His 
son has been very ill in Cincinna- 
ti and he came from his bedside 
He was also arranging to have the 
Equitable Bank qualify as the 
guardian of his niece, Miss Poland 
of Glencoe. 

Rev. J. D. Waters and family 
moved to MiUersburg, Ohio, last 
Saturday where he has taken 
charge as pastor of the Christian 
church. Rev. Jas. C. Lawson was 
to have filled the Walton pulpit 
on Sunday but was obliged to de- 
fer his visit here until Thursday 
when he will hold a meeting for 
several days. 

Wm. H; Senour, one of our old 
and highly esteemed citizens, died 
at lus home near Walton Monday 
afternoon from pneumonia. Hi; was 
in his 89th year and was born 
and reared where he died. He 
leaves a large estate, and had no 
family excepted an adopted daugh 
ter Miss Addie Ellis who carea 
for him in a most kindly manner 
during his latter years. The fun- 
eral will take place Wednesday. 

The cold weather burst the 
steam pipes at the Baptist church 
last Saturday and as there were 
no other method of heating the 
building services had to be de- 
ferred, but the members of the 
Christian church most cordially 
invited the Pastor Rev. R. L. 
Shirley to hold his services in 
their auditorium and the kindly 
offer was accepted until the heat 
ing apparatus in the Itaptiat 
church can be repaired. 

W. L. Whitehouse, of Covington, 
was here Monday and sold his 
farm of about 130 acres on W^k>1-« 
per creek to Wm. Mudmmr ana 
sob Earl, who recently sold their 
farm to John Howe, the farm be- 
ing in Kenton county and contain- 
ing 50 acres. Mr. Whitehouse took, 
as part payment the farm of C 
H. Alge in Gallatin county, con- 
taining 53 acres. Mr. Alge is the 
som-tn-iiaw of Mr. Mudman, an<J 
was here with his wife Monday 
to close the trade. 

James O. Pottenger died at hi3 
home on the Jos. C. Hughes farm 
last Wednesday from -pneumonia 
after an illness of three days. 
Mr Pottenger was born at Beaver 
Lick, June 6th. 1870, and was 
married to Miss Estelle Marsh, 
and to this union thirteen chil- 
dren were born all of whom art! 
living. He was a good citizen, and 
a member of the Odd-»Fe*lows and 
Modern Woodmen The funeral 
took place at Ilughes Chapel last 
Thursday. 

Dr. E. A. Cram who left here 
about a year ago for Woodmen, 
Colorado, to take treatment for 
tuberculosis, and wrote to friends 
here several months ago that he 
had about recovered, di^d from 
the disease at Oreat Palls, Mon- 
tana, Dec '2tith. aged 48 years. Be 
was the son of Wm H.andEm.i- 
leta Cram both of whom died 
within the past two years The 
remains of Dr. Cram were brought 
back to his old home at Butler, 
Pendleton county, by his brothers 
Harley and Roy Cram One daugh- 
ter survive* him 

Russell h Campbell *nd Ml** 
Mabel Mayhugh were united in the 
holy bonus of wedlock last Sat- 
urday evening at the residence of 
the officiating; minister, Rev II 
C Kunyan, in Latonla Chilntlan 
church, the attendants Ix'ing Cllf- 
A You«-ll and Miss Nellie 
•■%•> brtd. > '*»rty 

of J. D Mayhugh. 
tfca'gruooi i. a fine yuunit 
tWeala, sea oi Wm li I'aan 
,1 th* L »udN Radix* d 



young couple returned to. Walton 
and are making their home at the 
J. D. Mayjiugh residehce. 

The Walton Loose Leaf Tobae- 
co markets have been unusually 
high in selling price the past 
week and there have been very 
few rejections at either house. The 
crop of Hiram Long of Florence, 
averaged $99.87, and the crop of 
E. L. Mann and Ed. MrCurdy of 
near Fiskburg, containing 1720 
pounds averaged 983.66, both be- 
ing sold at the Walton Ware- 
house. Several high priced crops 
of a similar type and price sola 
at the Farmers' Warehouse. The 
market is being pushed strongly 
so as to have the sales complet- 
ed by March 1st, and it will be 
wise for the growers to market 
their tobacco as soon as they 
can as all of it should be dis- 
posed of by March 1st. 

Messrs. Reynolds ,Mengel and 
Eddy of Lima, Ohio, spent part of 
last week here urr*iig'jrg to drid! 
for oil near Big Bone Springs. A 
small company is being organized 
and work will begin in a short 
time. About fourteen years ago 
three holes were drilled at That 
place, one to the depth of about 
800 feet and a heavy flow of 
gas was struck. These men are of 
the opinion that there is oil in 
that locality in paying quantites 
and expect to drill three hob's 
to a much greater depth, and in 
support of their opinion are put- 
ting up a dollar for every one 
subscribed by the local people 
and are putting the entire mat- 
ter of finances in the hands of 
the local people, as well as the 
general management. About forty 
home people have taken stock 
and subscribed about $200 each 
and feel that there is a good 
opportunity to develop oil pro- 
ducing wells in that locality. 

Shelby Stephens died at the St. 
Elizabeth Hospital in Covington 
last Friday and his remains were 
brought here for interment Sat- 
urday, funeral services being held 
in Covington and a short service 
at the grave bv Rev. Rivofette 
DcMoisey. The deceased had a 
room at the home of Wm. Ack- 
man, and on Tuesday night of 
last week while in a delirium pro- 
duced by blood poisoning wanr- 
dered out about midnight bare- 
footed and in only his underclothr 
ing, though the snow and ice were 
heavy on the ground. He was en- 
deavoring to reach the home of 
John R. Feagan a couple of miles 
from town, and when near the 
home of Millard Allen the latter 
was attracted by his cries and 
took him in charge and hurried 
him to Mr. Feagan's, where he 
remained until the next morn- 
ing when his uncle A. M. Ed- 
wards took Mr. Stephens to the 
hospital in Covington. In his un- 
balanced condition while on the 
road, lie had bitten off the ends 
of two of his lingers, and these 
with another finger that was bad- 
ly mutilated had to be amputat- 
ed. Mr. Stephens was about 60 
years old and was born fiffid 
reared here 




PUBLC ; 



SALE 



Horses, Mules, Sheep, Hogs, 

Farm Implements. 

I will sell at public sale at my residence on the Union and 

Beaver road, two and one-half miles from 

Union, Boone County, Ky., 

\ Beginning at 10 o'clock a. m., on 

Mill, M 16, 

THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY. 




"SMOKERS' AGE" 

John E. Williams Advises The 
Growers of Tobacco to 
Produce Cigarette To- 
bacco as It Brings 
Highest Prices. 

John E. Williams, who repre- 
sents the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Co. of Winston-Salem, N. C, in 
the Burley tobacco district of 
Kentucky as a purchasing agent, 
has requested that attention be 
called to the fact that in the 
matter of the use of tobacco this 
is a ''Smokers' Age" and there is 
only a certain kind of tobacco 
that meets the requirements of the 
smoker, and that is the bright 
kind, and he advises the growers 
to grow the kind of tobacco the 
consumer likes the best if they 
want the price. In proof of the 
statement that the smoking to- 
bacco is largely in the ascendency 
attention is called 4o the IT. S. 
Government report on tobacco, 
showing the sales of smoking to- 
bacco to have increased 177 per 
cent, in the last year. Attention 
is also called to the fact that 
the growers about Lexington and 
in the Blue Grass territory raise 
nothing but biighi tobacco, chiefly 
Judy's Pride, and the Lexington 
market averages 65 to 75 cents per 
pound, while in the Walton ter- 
ritory and down to Carrollton 
where mostly the heavy red to- 
baccos are raised, the market 
averages from 30 to 40 cents pea- 
pound. Mr. Williams gives his opn 
ion that this is the. reason for 
the difference in price. His firm 
to encourage the raising of 
bright tobacco, bought several 
thousand dollars' worth of the 
Judy's Pride seed to dispose of 
in the territory where the heavy 
red tobacco is being raised This 
seed is all raised and matured un- 
der canvas and is tested by the 
Ky Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion and has been shown 08 t|p 
99 per cent, germination. This to- 
bacco should be planted early and 
about fifteen inches apart, and 
topped high at from fourteen to 
eighteen leuves This gives the 
lower leaves the proper shade and 
carries them up to cutting time 
without any injury The Judy's 
Pride himm! can be obtained from 
almost nnv loose leaf warehouse! 

or J B, Williams, Walton, Ky.. will 

furnish it at .f'2 per ounce, with 

f;u.nanter All of the big concerns 
lundling cigarette and Hinoklug 
tobaCCOA are urging the increase 
acreage of this bright tobttCPO 
ii. Hinting that the big price* are 
going CO i«ni. tin several \<-,ii-h 



Horses and Mules. 

Pair of Mules 7 and 8 years old, 16 1-2 hands 
high and good ones ; pair of unbroken 3 -year 
old Mules ; pair of aged horse Mules, as good as 
ever looked, thru a collar; 12-year old family 
Mare j 3-year old Filly. 

Sheep and Hogs. 

2 Poland China Sows and 12 Pigs ; 49 registered 
and purebred Hampshire Ewes,, bred to the best 
Ram imported from England last year, at a cost 
of $500 ; 9 registered yearling Hampshire Rams ; 
2 registered 2-year old Hampshire Rams; 40 
grade Ewes bred to above Rams. 



Farming Implements. 

2 good Road Wagons, 1 old Road Wagon, 2 Hay 
Beds, Rock Bed, Mowing Machine, Hay-rake, 
2 Oliver Cultivators, 3 Oliver E breaking Plows, 
Hillside Plow, Jumping Plow, single and double 
Shovel Plows, 2 5-tooth Harrows, pulverizing 
Roller, Corn Drills--- 1 and 2 row, Forks, Picks, 
Shovels, etc., good 2-horse Sled, Hinge Harrow, 
Iron Harrow, Disc Harrow, several new Gates, 
Fencing, 2 Wheelbarrows, 2 Lawn Mowers, 
Tools, etc., lot of Corn, Hay, etc., 3 Corn Shel- 
lers, Hog Scalding-box, Kettle, etc., Phaeton, sin- 
gle and double Buggy Harness, Bridle, Saddle, 4 
sets Work Harness, several Collars good as new. 



SOME HOUSEHOLD AND KITCHEN FURNITURE, 

Manure Spreader, two or three Log Chains, Several Tarpaulins, Horse Covers and Blankets, 
Sheep Clipping Machine. and a lot of Tobacco Sticks. 



I- 



TEBMS OIF 1 S^L. 

On sums of $10 and under, cash; on sums over $10 a credit of nine months 
without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved security* negotiable 
and payable in Union Deposit Bank, Union, Ky., before removing property. 

LUNCH FREE 

GEO. BURKITT, Auctioneer. 



C. W. Lassing. 



h 



4< 



* 



Annual Statement 

Forty-Second Annual Report of the Farmers Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company of Boone County: 



Cash on hand January 1,1919 $ 101 41 

Income During 1919: 

Assessment and Policy Fee* $3,350 73 

Lot sold ._. ._ 150 00 -3,500 73 

Total $3,602 14 

Expenditures for 1919: 

Losses Paid 2,552 60 

Salaries paid to officers and employes 664 50 

Taxes paid 15 40 

Borrowed money paid 201 00 

Printing and Supplies 74 77 



Total of all Expenditures 

Cash Balance January 1, 1920 



3,507 77 



$94 37 

N. C. TANNER, President. 
R. B. HUEY, Secretary. 



• Mi (lit- night of tin- gird t*iM , 
Z,iinin«'i, BfOWQ and Wlngste will 
give soother of those uetightfal 
dances mi the Hebron (mil All 
v»ho utlond will have u graml lime 
us u» always th«« nine on these 
u. • ... 



J. H. Respess, of Florence, this 
county hns been appointed a mem 
ln>r of the Htute Racing Commis- 
sion by Governor Morrow. Mr. 

KeSpOSS 1» OM <>f th& mOtfl IM't-l 

•a turfmen of the country una- 
his appointment as a member of 
the commission will give univor- 
aal satisfaction among the racing 
people. 

Maysvllto-Dura Owen* was In- 
dkt.«d on the charge of having 
cashed t*oth s check for IM1 awl 
■nothef foe SfllMl. given to correct 
the ilrst try lludde A Co., < tneln- 
nati 



County Clerk Rogers has com- 
pleted the recapitulation of the 
Tax Commissioners * book for 
this year. The Increase In the to- 
tal vslustlon of property Is W«6r 
m over that of last year. The 

value of farm tapl" 1 *"!* •"? n~ 
tsnglhle property Is I1.0TM70 on 
this amount the county wlU col- 
lect so revenue. T ho tanc rease in 
the valna of lands to In round 
number $soo,<»« 

James M. isephsna, of Hathaway 
neighborhood, died of pnMi.iu.nla 
Tuesday ■»»■"« 



SATISFACTIO 



It is worth a great deal to you to have a feeling 
of perfect satisfaction about the manner in which 
your financial business is handled* 

Let us take care of 'your business and yoi/ be 
the judge as to whether or not it is properly 
handled. 

Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

Capital $30,000. 
Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) $50,000 

We have a few more Farmers Account Bonks 

for distribution among our patrons. 

CALL FOR ONE. 




FOR RENT. 

I will rent my farm to a good hon- 
Ml man for $860 cash, allow $60 for 
fnnolng or anyother necessary Im- 
provements. Write ms if you mtM 

nurniiose -.._-.-.■». 

MRfii J. A ROUKHH 

» lotah HruokvlIlM, Mo. 



WANTED. 

Men to raise tobacco on tiew 
Kronen" and work by the day whim 
not in she crop. 

W. A. UA1NKH A HON. 
ofshM llurllnnl.nl. K 

R. I» I. 



T 



■^^^■^■•^ 



; 



r 



v^mm 



mm 



mtmm 



BO0NE_COUNT7_RECORpER 



V 



. 



fioeaf Ifappenings. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D„ Pastor. 

Preaching every Sunday morning 

and evening. 
Bible School every Sunday at 10 a. 

in.— Sara Allen, 'Superintendent. 
BGf"A cordial Invitation is extended 
to all our ser-dces. 



THE TOBACCO MARKETS. ™"*~jl R ">> e «*- 



Boons Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

Rev. Gko. A. Roykr, Paator. 
SUNDAY, JANUARY IHtli, 1920, 

Hebron 10:00 a. m.— Holy Com 
munlon. Sermon by Pastor." 

Sunday School 3 p. in. 

All heartily welcomed to these 
services. 

NOTICE.— The examination for 
Common School Diplomas will be 
held at the Court Hoime in Hurlinir- 
ton, January 30 and 81. 

J. C. GORDON. Supt. 

Prepare your tobacco plant beds 
for burning. 

Ground hog day comes on Mon- 
day thla year. 

Have- you noticed that the days 
are getting longer? 

W. L, Kirkpatrick is remodeling 
the interior of his store. 



The growing wheat has fared 
pretty well so far this winter. 

Al Rogers, of Belleview, was 
transacting business in Burlington, 
Tuesday. 

Colonel Crisler is improving rap 
idly and expects to be in his shop 
in a few days. 

The town of Walton has been 
overrun with wagona loaded with 
tobacco for several days. 

The census enumerators have 
been having some pretty tough 
weather since they began work. 

Judge Gaines went to Owenton. 
Owen county, last Monday to hold 
a two weeks' special term of cir-. 
cuit court 

Tho heating system was put in 
order in time for the achoof to 
resume work in the Behoof build- 
ing last Monday morning. 



Aurora, Ind., Jan. 10.— The Au- 
rora loose leaf tpfaaeco ware- 
house sold today 62,155 lbs., to- 
bacco at average of $36.95. Mar- 
ket very strong on bright tobac- 
cos, while the common grades ad- 
vanced $1 and $2 per 100 pounds. 
The high basket today sold for 
$1.02 per pound. 

Shelbyville, Ky., Jan 10— Dur- 
ing the past week 1,321,665 lb*., 
of tobacco were sold on thiamar-» 
ket for ¥435,228.11, an average of 
$32.93. The sales for the season 
aggregate 5,016 910 lbs., for $1,889,- 
870.76, an average of $38.85. 

Madison, Ind., Jan. 10 —Sales on 
the local tobacco breaks thi9 
week totaled 481,195 lbs at an av- 
erage of $31.71. Receipts have been 
heavy all week and the demand 
I has negn 'ljrisk Th p r» vu a 
slight slump in the market Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, hut sale* 
Friday showed a decided advance 
on almost all kinds of tobacco, 
with a basket of fancy lugs sell- 
ing at $1.06, the high mark for 
the season. A number of growers 
with fancy crops received an av- 
erage of $70 to $79. 

Covington, January 12.— The first 
sale of the week in the Coving- 
ton loose leaf burley tobacco 
market was held this morning at 
the Kenton Warehouse with a to- 
tal offering of 75,410 pounds. It 
was stated after the sale that 
there was a large portion of low 
grades, which accounts for the 
comparatively low average for the 
day. Good to fine red leaf and 
lugs seemed fully as strong aj 
last week, and all colory tobaccos 
were in good request at steady 
prices. Common smoker stock was 
weak, though not quotably lower 
in »prlce. Rejections for the day 
were rather free, totaling 16,620 
pounds, leaving an actual sale of 
58,820 pounds. Average $27.*29 per 
100 lbs. Select leaf ran as high 
as 96 cents per lb., while theicon*- 
mon BOrts ranged downward as 
low as $5.40. 

Walton, Jan. 12— The Farmers' 
Loose Leaf house sold 93,755 lbs., 
of tobacco today at an average 
of $33.93. There were very few 
rejections. The high price for 
the day was $1.02 a pound. There 
is enough tobacco at this house 
now for two more sales. 



Harmony Lodge No, IK, I. O. O. F. 
B lg-B e n e , Ky.. Jan. I, 1920. 
Whereas, The Grand Master of the 
Universe lias seen tit in His Infinite 
wisdom to call from labor on earth 
to refreshments to that Celestial 
Lodge on high our beloved brother, 
Jamss O. Fottinger, who depared 
this lire January 7th, 1920; 

Whereas, Brother Pottinger was a 
member of Harmony Lodge No. 125, 
I. O. O F., also the Modern Wood- 
men of America, and s devout mem- 
ber of tho Methodist church; 

Whereas, The funeral was held 
from the HughesChapel M.E.church 
almost in sight of where ho lived a 
number of years a great number of 
his sorrowing friends paving tribute 
to his going away; therefore be it 

Resolved. That the fraternity has 
lost one of its noblest character, the 
family, a loving husband and father 
the community, one of its best citi- 
zens, and that we ex tend to the family 
our heartfelt sympathy in this their 
sad hour of bereavement, and com- 
mend them to Him who doeth all 
things well. 

Resolved. That a copy of these 
resolutions bs sent to the family, a 
copy spread niton the records, and a 
copy be sent to the Boone County 
Recorder for publication. 

Committee ----Frank Allen. (5. K. 
Hughes. 
(LB.) 



THURSDAY JAN. 16, 1920 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GEEATEST STORE. 




PUBLIC SALE. 



Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



rap- 1 



Covington, Jan. 13.— Altho light- 
n In the price of to-! T r °"<'-\-ngs prevailed in the Cov- 
week started the weed '"8*°" loose .leaf burley tobacco 

market today the break as a whole 
was high in grade and the mar- 
ket displayed decidedly more an- 
imation than onM onday. Offerings 
totaled 47,585 pounds' of which 
only 2,000 lbs., were rejected, leav 
ing an actual sale of 45,495 lbs. 



The boom 
bacco last 

towards the markets pretty 
idly the first of this week 



It will not bi> long until there 
is a change in the operation of the 
Burlington garage. It is not 
known yet who will succeed Ed- 
dins Bros. 



Nice skating on the sidewalks 
In Burlington last Friday, ami 
several of the boys and lirls took 
advantage of the occasion to In- 
dulge in 'the sport. 



The local truck men have been 
very busy the past week hauling 
tobacco and moving the personal 
effects of those who have pur- 
chased farms elsewhere. 



W. L. Whitehouse, who owned 



Aurot-a, Ind., January 13. — The 
Aurora Loose Leaf Tobacco Ware 
house Company sold today 76,26') 
pounds of tobacco at an average 
of $40.50 perl 00 lbs. The floor con-r 
sisted principally of good tobac- 
co, which sold high, while the 
common grades did not show any 
material change in price. 

Boone Post Will Give a Dance. 

The boys of the Boone Post 
American Legion will give a din » 
at Florence I. O O F. Hall on 
the Charles Sebree farm down on i Friday evening, Jan 23rd, t920 
Woolper creek a few years has . The commute? is endeavoring to 
sold it to a gentleman by the : make this an ideal social githei*- 
name of William Mudman 1 ing with chaperones in attendance 

— — |and the best of music. They want 

Kenneth Stamper, 24. son of Bud ! it understood that it is not for 
Stamper, and Miss Nora Mae Mui- ; members alone but for their 
lins, 27, daughter of Frank Mul- friends as well. 

Una, were married yesterday at ■ 

Rev. C. E. Baker's in Belleiview. William Satchwill moved to his 

— imi f \ Ii.diana home last Monday going 

John J Moloney, Jr., a Pig by way of Covington. Quite a 
Club Boy, of Erlanger, won third | good sized colony of Boone's mist 
prize in the November Letter] excellent people have gone to the 
Contest conducted by the Pig j Manchester, Indiana, section in 
Club Department of The Duroc the last few voars. They ate all 



I will sell at my residence 1-K of a 
mile from Hopeful church, Boone 
county, Ky., beginning at.12 o'clock 
uoon, on r 

Saturday, January 17th, 1920 

the following property: 
1 good work and driving Horse 
1 yearling Heifer 
1 spring Wagon 
I Vulcan Chilled Plow 
1 "A" Harrow 
1 Hay rake 
I Mowing Machine 
Some Meat and Lard 
Househnld'and Kitchen Furniture. 
Terms -Sums of $5 .00 and under, 
cash; on sums over $5-00 a credit of 
six in oh t lis without interest, purch- 
aser to give note with good security 
payable in Peoples Deposit Bank. 
Burlington, Kv. 

C. E. TANNER. 
Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. 



Classified Qduertisemenfs. 



MILK COWS 



For Sale— FRESH 
AT ALL TIMES, 

CLAUD CONNER, 
LUDLOW R. D. 2, 
Near Pt. Pleasant church. Boone 
County, Ky aug. 20 



For Sale— Jersey cow and nice 
heifer calf five weeks old. W. S 
Acra, Burlington R. D. 3. 



Lost— On Dixie Highway, Tues- 
day, a Ford rug. Finder will con- 
fer a favor by leaving it at mv 
residence above Florence or at the 
Bethel Auto Sales Company, in 
Covington. 
P AUL BETHE L. 

Wanted— Man to raise tobacco 
and work by the day. Eunie Wil- 
lis, Burlington R. D. 1. 



Removal Sale of 

Rugs and Draperies 

The Greatest Value Giving Event This_ Department 

Has Ever Held. 



and in a 
this flloor 



;mpdt 

fiur 
few 



We're remodeling. The sensational growth of our entire store has necessitated the e 
larging of/ur selling space. We are taking the entire third floor of our big building, 
days the Rug and Drapery "Section will move into their new quarters on 
But, we are not going to move a piece of merchandise that it is possible 
to sell before moving time. Therefore, the remarkable reductions on THE ENTIRE 
STOCK of Rugs and Draperies in this wonderful sale. Only a few of the items are 
mentioned here. 



9x12 Brussells Rugs $ 

Seamless Tapestry Brussells 
Rugs that sell regularly at $30. 
Splendid conventional designs. 



22 



.50 



$1.75 Scrim and Voile Curtains, 
Have pretty lace edges and some 
with lace insertings. Big special 
value for this sale at pair 



$1.45 



l 



9x12 Brussells Rugs $ 

These are $45.00 Seamless Tap- 
estry Rugs in three beautiful de- 
signs. Splendid colorings. 



»" 



9x12 Velvet &. Axminster Rugs${ 

Seamless and made Velvet and 
Axminster Rugs that are worth 
$55 and $60 today. Greatly rduced for this 
sale to $39.75. 



39" 



Irish Point, Duchess Point and French 
Sill Net Curtains. 

Choice of our entire stock. They sell regu- 
larly at $4.75 to $12.50 the pair. On sale 
at a reduction of 20 Per Cent. 



9x12 Ardsley Axminster Rugs $| 

Genuine Ardsley Axminster rugs 
that we have been selling at $65 
though they are worth $70 today. Amaz- 
ing values in this sale at only $59.75. 



W 



Odd Lot of Curtains Priced at 

Beautiful Curtains, one or two 
pairs of a kind, in voile, scrim, 
marquisette and lace. Regularly priced at 
$2.00 to $10.00 the pair. 



1-2 



35c Curtain Marquisette, yard 

Yard wide, in white, cream and 
ecru ; finished with tape border. 
Big value at yard 27c. 



27c 




Lost— Auto chaiin on pike 
tween Grant and Burlington 
Jan. 12th. Finder will please 
turn to Walton Rice, Burlingtpn 
R. D. 2. 6 

«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ BELLEVIEW. « 

♦ ♦ 

► ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦o - may be necessary to pay State, 

Wm. Rea of Patriot, Ind, «-,«! County and School tax due thereon 
a caller hei-e last week. 
Geo. Rice spent Tuesday 



"" Notlee is hereby given that I, or 
on i one of my deputies will, on Monday, 
' February 2na, 1920, it being County 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. in. /and 3 o'clock p. m. at the Court 
House door, in the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., expose to 
public sale for cash in hand, the fol- 
lowing property, or so much thereof 



was 



i-ulletin. doing well and are pleasc-l with 

■ their new home and thci • naw 

C. T. Claunch, the Ernlngei- Real neighbors. Joe Huey and one of 
Estate Agent, sold for W. H. Good I Gulley & Petitt's .trucks movea 
ridge a farm of 125 acres on the 'him . 
Dixie Highway, between Erlanger J ■ 

^^ ^ nCe Jfnnn Wrek ' tf> '' B A ^mpany' is being organized 
Sanders, for 22,000. for the pVpW* of sinking wells 



night 
with his brother Joshua. 

Mrs. C. S. Smith is visiting rela- 
tives in Union neighborhood. 

Mrs. James Smith, Sr., has bei'n 
on the sick list the past week. 

Pepper Smith has opened his 
warehouse and has purchased a 
lot of tobacco the "past week 



J and unpaid for the year 1919, and the 
; penalty, interest and costs thereon. J 
j ___ For a complete description of propyl 
erly see Assessors Book for the as- ' 
cessment for 1918, at the County 
Clerk's Office: 

L. A. CONNER. 
Sheriff Boone County. 

Burlington Precinct. 



DIRECT DEALING PAYS BEST. 

When cream ia ready to sell, the hard work hat been done and you should 
1 not permit any outsider to make an extra profit off your efforts. 
You can ship your cream DIRECT to the Tri- State and save from 3 to 
5 cts. per Ih, of butter-fat It is just as easy to delirer the Cream to a rail- 
road station as to a buying station. The Tri-State pays the freight and 
guarantees your cream against loss in transit. 

Mrs. Thos. Daulton, Peebles. O., writes on Nov. 25, 191 9- "I have shipped 
cream to the Tri-State Butter Co. for three years and hare been satisfied. 
I have sold cream to cream stations in order to return the empty can with 
me, as I live 9 miles from the railroad and always lost from $1.50 to $2.00 
on every can of cream sold to agents." i 



70c 



Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kite, of Bur- : Manning, Jasper, 4 acres, bal * 2 03 



The telephone lines 
Limaburg and Hebron were 
hard by the big sleet that came 
last Thursday night, numerous 
poles being broken off at tho 
top of tho ground. 

Simeon E. House, the old polit- 
ical war hosa from Union, was a 
business visitor to Burlington last 
Monday. He is staying this win-, 
ter with John N. Crisler, of Long 
Branch, who is in poor health. 



Rennker & Youell sold the small 
farm that Thomas Hensley bought 
of them to J. B. Arvin a few 
days ago at a nice profit. Mr. 
Arvin has rented the re*idcince 
Mr. Rensley bought of J. W. Kel- 
ly in Burlington. 



in the neighborhood of Big Bone 
between Springs to ascertain if oil exists 
i in that territory. Oil men have 
looked that section over ami 
give it as their opinion that />il 
will be found in paying quantifies 
if those in search of it will Jro 
deej) enough. The test made there 
several years ago was only a sur- 
face Investigation and those who 
fianced that work were never sat- 
isfied that oil woulcT not have 
been found had a well been sunk 
several hundred foet deeper. It is 
hoped that the Big Bone terri- 
tory will be given a test that 
will settle the question and a 
flock of gushera Sviil be brought 
in. 



County Attorney B. H. Rifev. 
and Atty. S. W. Tolln went to 
Rabbit Hash, Tuesday, to try 
John Hewitt, charged with Violat- 
ing the compulsory educational 
law of the State. The trial re- 
sulted In the defendant being fin- 
ed five dollars and costs. 



The government is adverti:-itng 
for bids for carrying the U. o. 
Mail between Covington and Bur- 
lington for four years, oommwic- 
ftlie first. of next July. Hu- 
: House, th<- present carrier, is 
ng out the contract of John 
r ill, and his pay ia $1,700 per 
um 

The Recorder is in receipt of so 

article purporting to liHVe Im'i»!I 

written In Lexington, this I 

booming < "innion wealth's \tioi- 

\u-\ John J Howe as a candidate 

(oi Congress in this dui> 

why the writer lulled to aign his 

hi* to the article la unaccount- 
able ih isinly had inn mi-Mi 
h* Huliwim .1 of the gentleman 
in i cat he Wrote 



So/inr Boone county has shown 
very little disposition to assist in 
the construction of the Federal 
Aid roal from Louisville to Cov- 
ington, and in so far an she i» 
concerned the proposed highway 
will not come this way. It teams 
that Boone is alrout the only 
county a.ong the proposed route 
that has not mad.' a heroic efftorC 
to raise its quota ior the work 
Boone has just spent the pro- 
ceeds of a two hundred thousand 
dollar bond issue in roads and the 
resutU are not at all satisfactory, 
consequently it will l>e some time 
before the county Will lay down 
another large sum of money for 

public loads The c\|.i i i, !,(••' thll 
cuuiuy has had it worth the ooat, 
and a different road system will 

have to prevail In her juried ictiu i 

before minis more milc-i of pik • 

are built al the public rxpen 
\ strange dUeote ha* uppi i 

in Okliihom i <. hat it pi o\ iii ■, 
sii\ fatal and htWMiiiK tin- ci 
fori* oi the physicians s im , 
think it i* cholera w Kile ul net i 
claim it is a follower or tin* (in 
In some titles the Ittgvi | i 
ih* i -» »lt id 



lington, were the guests of Mi 
and Mrs. C. E. McNeely, Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dolph ami 
son, Oarnett, spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs W. A. Fritz, 'in Ohio. 

Mrs. Eliza Riddell reached her 
80th birthday Jan. 8th. She is 
abo/e the average in health ana 
preservation for one that age 

The Citizens Deposit Bank h»ln 
its regular annual election Tues- 
day, Jan. 13th, 1920, and the same 
board of directors were rotained 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Cason, 
Misses Laura Whitenaek, Mazella 
Flick and Kathryn Maurer, are 
Sunday dinner with Mr. and Mrs. 
James O. Smith. 



State News. 



Hickman— The Newberry O.l Co. 
will spend $151,000 in search of oil 
in this section, and will begin 
drilling the fLst well this week 
Winchester — Wheat suffered 
thru washing rains or last week. 
roots being exposed to subsequent 
freezes. 

Hazard— The Council has gone 
on reeO ' .'d . With what is railed a 
line law, forbidding ferrying for 
toll across North Fork on Sun- 
day. 

Louisville— Threat of a church 
strike is seen by' some in the re- 
cord outpouring to theaters fol- 
lowing the agitation by ministers 
for Sunday closing o! movten, 

Ashland 'The Fiscal ('out ep- 
propriated §10*001 ■ rear for two 

years tO make lto\ I c unity an 

* -t 1 1 tunc' health unit 

Attention K oi P '■ Meeting 

ing Saturday night, Jan 7th De* 
jto-r woe* Ever) member should 
In* preaenl 

Hill II, OH ill ' III 

It* III I « lit* 11 I I'M |!.i|ili| Nl\ 

a hi Mr and Mm Hukie have 



♦ if five Kills 



Floreuce Precinct. 

Robinson, J. C. n r 13 acres $17.05 

Carpenter, Mary A, town lot. 11.8o 

Cleek, Albert, town lot. 7.D2 

Constance Precinct. 
Phelps, LewiB, n r, town lot 8.38 

Ru-;s, James, town lot 5.90 

Ziinmer. B. F., town lot !>.S6 

Petersburg Precinct. 
Jarrell, Lewis, n r, town lot. 6.78 
Liwruuceburg Ferry, town lot. 

balance due '2.00 

Bulllttsville Precinct. 

Anderson, E. M. n r town lot 8.77 

Belleview Precinct. 

Wingate, L, n r, 19 acres. . 10.68 

Wilson, Elizabeth, town lot 5.30 

Hamilton Precinct. 

Rice, Erastus, 2 acres &f$ 

Union Precinct. 

Rusk, Wayne, n r, IV) acres IS. 7 1 

PRIVATE SALE 

of Furniture consisting of 

1 living room Suite of Daviuette 
Chair, Rocker and Library Tabic 
in Walnut, upholstered in genuine 
brown leather. New 

I Dining Table and Chairs in Jaco- 
bean finished Oak. New. 

1 Royal Milton Rug 9x12. New. 

1 Pressed Milton Run 9t\£ New. 

10 yards Linoleum. New. N.mi 
been used. 

I Bedroom Suite. Oak. 
Come and see tlo-in. 

J. K. C VSON, . 

Lexington Pike, Kisinen , opposite 

Mrs. deck's. 



We Pay the 
Freight and 

per pound for butter fat 

week Jan. 12th to 18th, inclusive. 

The Tri-State Butter Co 

CASH CAPITAL $250,000.00. CINCINNATI. O. 

B 

If you need cans, write for Free Trial Cans. 

L 35,000 cream producers find it most profitable to ship direct. 







DID YOU KNOW 



That- 



FOR SALE. 

— _♦ 

Ituiiiii r tin- buggy, i:<"'d «*■ in * 

been in uae * •-.»! new i\ palith -l 

UORDON I.VII.K, 
jK.it |g t2 1* h»tcm«v I*. ) 

»•»♦♦♦»■»■♦"»•»■♦+•»•»••'■» +*'">■•»•»+•. 
TAKB Vol H COUNTY I* A I 

♦ ♦ +-M>++++T*r*++++++4*+-rt*>'r 



-is the strongest 



way 



-This is the largest country bank in Northern 
Kentucky and where your surplus funds are ab- 
solutely safe. 

That---We pay 3 per cent interest ; also your taxes 
— on deposits. — — 

That--We serve about 1,000 people. 

That— Our Safe-— The Mosler Corliss- 
safe made. 

That— We want you to use this bank in every 
in which it will be a benefit to you. 

That -WHEN BETTER SERVICE IS POSSIBLE, 
THIS BANK WILL RENDER IT. 
If you are not a customer, call in and talk matters 
over with us. We know you will be a benefit to 
us and trust that we can be of some service to you. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky, 

Resources Over Half Million Dollars. 

W. L B. ROUSE, Pre.id.m. A. B. RENAKER, Ca.hi.r. 

EDGAR C. RILEY, Vice Pres. 
NELL H. MARTIN, Asst. Cashiar. L T. UTZ, A.st. Ca.hier. 



DO VOU TAKK THK RtCCORDEK? 

Try It One Year - You'll Like It. 
Only $1.60 the Year 

•oriKmt- I "nil iu Hood All The Ada In 1 his lasue.-sfe 



THURSDAY JAN. 



1920 



BOONS COUNTY RSCORDI1 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

* WALTON. ♦ 



John E. Williams of Covington, 
was a visitor here and at lus 
farm near Riehwood Sunday. 

J W Fitzgerald of Danville, was 
the guest of his daughter Mrs. R. 
L. Shirley and family a - part of 
last week. 

Mr and Mrs. Ernest DeMoisey 
and Mr. and Mrs. Steiner of Lud- 
low, were the guests of Mrs. Mary 
Fields Sunday. 

J. S. Ballard of Charleston, W. 
Va, who has been here on a visit 
to his brother T. O. Ballard ana 
wife, returned home last week. 

Mrs. D. B. Wallace leturned last 
Thursday from a very pfeasant 
visit to her brother Dr. G. « A. 
Mottier and wife of Indianapolis. 
Rev. Dr. W. W. Evans who re- 
cently went to Oakland, Cala., 
writes that he arrived safely ana 
is enjoying the delightful, weather 
there. 

Miss Jane Dickey who has been 
here a couple of months on ac-< 
count of illness was able to re- 
turn to her school work at Fay- 
etteville, Arkansas, this week. 

Married— Paul W. Bowling of 
Pendleton county, and Miss Lillie 
May Norman al Jelfersonville, In- 
diana. The bride is a daughter of 
Wm. B. Norman of Walton. 

Jesse Laws who recently return 
ed from Australia where he has 
been the past seven years, spent 
last week here with his broiher 
Dudley G. Laws and family. 

Ernest W. McBli'Oy, who has 
been employed in t incininUi camo 
home here last week to rest up as 
his physician directed that he 
would bo benefitted and avoid a 
nervous breakdown. 

Mrs. Bluford W. Aylor, of Gran- 
din, North Dakota, spent last week 
here and left Saturday for Tampa, 
Florida, to spend the winter. Mr. 
Aylor is expected hero in a couple 
of weeks on a visit. 

McClure Chapter Royal Arch -M.i 
sons will have its regular com- 
munication Friday night, Jan. 16, 
when there will be work in the 
degrees. All of the Companions 
are urged to be present. 

Mrs. Gertrude Gardt who has 
been visiting here left Friday for 
Cincinnati on a visit to friends 
and will then return to her homo 
at Newark, Ohio. Her cousin K. 
Bruce Wallace accompanied her 
to Cincinnati for a couple of days' 
visit 

R. A. Poland, of Owen-co., was 
here Monday consulting John L. 
Vest about some law business. His 
6on has been very ill in Cincinna- 
ti and he came from his bedside 
He was also arranging to have the 
Equitable Bank qualify as the 
guardian of his niece, Miss Poland 
of Glencoe. 

Rev. J. D. Waters and family 
moved to MUlorsburg, Ohio, last 
Saturday where he has taken 
charge as pastor of the Christian 
church. Rev. Jas. C. Lawson was 
to have filled the Walton pulpit 
on Sunday but was obliged to de- 
fer his visit here until Thursday 
when he will hold a meeting for 
several days. 

Wm. H; Senour, one of our ola 
and highly esteemed citizens, died 
at his home near Walton Monday 
afternoon from pneumonia. Ho was 
in his 89th year and was born 
and reared where he died. He 
leaves a large estate, and had no 
family excepted an adopted daugh 
ter Miss Addie Ellis who carea 
for him in a most kindly manner 
during his latter years. The fun- 
eral will take place Wednesday. 

The cold weather burst the 
steam pipes at the Baptist church 
last Saturday and as there were 
no other method of heating the 
building services had to be de- 
ferred, but the members of the 
Christian church most cordially 
invited the Pastor Rev. R. L. 
Shirley to hold his services in 



young couple returned to, Walton 
and are making their home at the 
J. D. Mayhugh residence. 

The Walton Loose Leaf Tobac- 
co markets have been unusually 
high in selling price the past 
week and there have been very- 
few rejections at either house. The 
crop of Hiram Long of Florence, 
averaged $99.87, and the crop of 
E. L Mann and Ed. MrCurdy of 
near Fiskburg, containing 1720 
pounds averaged 983.66, both be- 
ing sold at the Walton Ware- 
house. Several high priced crops 
of a similar type and price sola 
at the Farmers' Warehouse. The 
market is being pushed strongly 
so as to have the sales complet- 
ed by March 1st, and it will be 
wise for the growers to market 
their tobacco as soon as they 
can as all of it should be dis- 
posed of by March 1st. 

Messrs. Reynolds ,Mengel and 
Eddy of Lima, Ohio, spent part of 
last week here arranging to drill 
for oil near Big Bone Springs. A 
small company is being organized 
and work will begin in a short 
time. About fourteen years ago 
three holes were drilled at that 
place, one to the depth of about 
800 feet and a heavy flow of 
gas was struck. These men are of 
the opinion that there is oil in 
that locality in paying quautites 
and expect Ui drill three hob's 
to a much greater depth, and in 
support of their opinion are put- 
ting up a dollar for every one 
subscribed by the local people 
and are putting the entire mat- 
ter of finances in the hands of 
the local people, as well as th^ 
general management. About forty 
home poo, pie have taken stock 
and subscribed about $200 each 
and feel that there is a good 
opportunity to develop oil pro- 
ducing wells in that locality. 

Shelby Stephens died at the St. 
Elizabeth Hospital in Covington 
last Friday and his remains were 
brought here for interment Sat- 
urday, funeral services being hell 
in Covington and a short service 
at the grave bv Rev. Rivofette 
DeMoisey. The deceased had a 
room at the home of Wm. Ack- 
man, and on Tuesday night of 
last week while in a delirium pro- 
duced by blood poisoning wai*- 
dered out about midnight bare- 
footed and in only his underclothr 
ing, though the snow and ice were 
heavy on the ground. He was en- 
deavoring to reach the home of 
John R. Fcagan a coupfe of miles 
from town, and when near the 
home of Millard Allen the latter 
was attracted by his crie3 and 
took him in charge and hurried 
him to Mr. Feagan's, where he 
remained until the next morn- 
ing when his uncle A. M. Ed- 
wards took Mr. Stephens to the 
hospital in Covington. In his un- 
balanced conditiotn while on the 
road, ne had bitten off the ends 
of two of his lingers, and these 
with another finger that was bad- 
ly mutilated had to be amputat- 
ed. Mr. Stephens was about 60 
years old and was born fiiffid 
reared hero. 



"SMOKERS' M' 

John E. Williams Advises The 
Growers of Tobacco to 
Produce Cigarette To- 
bacco as It Brings 

Highest Prices. 

* 

John E. Williams, who repre- 
sents the R. J. ReynoldB Tobacco 
Co. of Winston-fialem, N. C, in 
the Burley tobacco district ' of 
Kentucky as a purchasing agent, 
has requested that attention be 

called to the fact that in the 
matter of the use of tobacco this 
is a "Smokers' Age'' and there is 
only a certai:i kind of tobacco 
that meets the requirements of the 



their auditorium and the kindfy smoker, and that is the bright 



offer was accepted until the heat 
ing apparatus in the Baptist 
church can be repaired. 

W. L. Whifehouse, of Covington, 
was here Monday and sold his 
farm of about 130 acres on Woolt 
per creek to Wm Madman ana 
son Earl, who recently sold their 
farm to John Howe, the farm be- 
ing in Kenton county and contain- 
ing 50 acres. Mr. Whitehouse took 
as part payment the farm of C. 
H. Alge in Gallatin county, con- 
taining 53 acres. Mr. Alge is the 
soni-tn-iiaw of Mr. Mudman, an<a 
was here with his wife Monday 
to close the trade. 

James O. Pottenger died at his 
home on the Jos. C. Hughes farm 
last Wednesday from pneumonia 
after an. illness of three days. 
Mr Pottenger was born at Beaver 
Lick, June 6th, 1870, and was 
married to Miss Estelle M&rsh, 
and to this union thirteen ehif- 
dren were born all of whom aru 
living. He was a good citizen, and 
a member of the Oddfellows and 
Modern Woodmen The funeral 
took place at Hughes Chapel last 
Thursday. 

Dr. E. A. Cram who left here 
about a year ago for Woodmen, 
Colorado, to take treatment for 
tuberculosis, and wrote to friends 
here several months ago that he 
had about recovered, died from 
the disease at Great Falls, Mon- 
tana, Dec 26th, aged 42 years. lie 
was the son of Wm. H and Ema- 
leta Cram both of whom died 
within the past two years. The 
remains of Dr. Cram were brought 
back to his old home at butler, 
Pendleton county, by his brothers 
Barley and Roy Cram One -daugh- 
ter survives him 

Russell H. Campbell and Mild 
Mabel Mayhugh were united In the 
holy bonds of wedlock last Sat- 
urday evening at the residence of 
the officiating minister, K<v II 
C Runysn, of Latonla Chi Istlan 
church, the atliMidaiuta U-lng Clif- 
ford A Youell and Mim* Nellie 
Johnson The bride is the pretty 
Snehter of J l> Mayhugh. 
tJhecrvom Is a fine young geii- 
tUtsan son of Wm l» <'am|.o«>ll 
TthJ L sikI N KellroaU Taa 



kind, and he advises the growers 
to grow the kind of tobacco the 
consumer likes the best if they 
want the price. In proof of the 
statement that the smoking to>- 
bacco is largely in the ascendency 
attention is called to the U. S. 
Government report on tobacco, 
showing the sales of smoking to- 
bacco to have increased 177 per 
cent, in the last year. Attetntion 
is also called to the fact that 
the growers about Lexington and 
in the Blue Grass territory raise 
nothing but biighi tobacco, chiefly 
Judy's Pride, and the Lexington 
market averages 65 to 75 cents per 
pound, while in the Walton ter- 
ritory and down to Carrollton 
where mostly the heavy red to- 
baccos are raised, the market 
averages from 30 to 40 cents per 
pound. Mr. Williams gives his opn 
ion that this is the, reason for 
the difference in price. His firm 
to encourage the raising of 
bright tobacco, bought several 
thousand dollars 1 worth of the 
Judys Pride seed to dispose of 
in the territory where the heavy 
red tobacco is being raised. This 
seed is all raised and matured un- 
der canvas and is teBted by tho 
Ky Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion and has been shown 98 tp 
99 per cent, germination. This to- 
bacco should be planted early and 
about filteen inches apart, and 
topped high at from fourteen to 
eighteen leaves. This gives tho 
lower leaves the- proper shade and 
carries them up to cutting time 
without any Injury. The Judy's 
Pride seed can be obtained from 
almost anv loose leaf warehouse; 
or -I B. Williams, Walton, Ky.wlll 
furnish it at $2 per ounce, with 
guarantee All of the big concerns. 
handling cigarette and smoking 
tobaccos are urging tho Increutwt 
acreage of this bright tobacco 
ii. Hinting that the big puces are 
going to remain several years. 




SALE 



Horses, Mules, Sheep, Hogs, 

Farm Implements. 

I will sell at public sale at my residence on the Union and 

Beaver road, two and one-half miles from 

Union, Boone County, Ky., 



Beginning at 10 o'clock a. m., on 



RUHJMLK 




THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY. 



Horses and Mules. 

Pair of Mules 7 and 8 years old, 16 1-2 hands 
high and good ones ; pair of unbroken 3 -year 
old Mules ; pair of aged horse Mules, as good as 
ever looked thru a collar ; 12-year old family 
Mare ? 3-year old Filly. 

Sheep and Hogs. 

2 Poland China Sows and 12 Pigs ; 49 registered 
and purebred Hampshire Ewes, bred to the best 
Ram imported from England last year, at a cost 
of $500 ; 9 registered yearling Hampshire Rams ; 
2 registered 2-year old Hampshire Rams; 40 
grade Ewes bred to above Rams. 



Farming Implements. 

2 good Road Wagons, 1 old Road Wagon, 2 Hay 
Beds, Rock Bed, Mowing Machine, Hay-rake, 
2 Oliver Cultivators, 3 Oliver E breaking Plows, 
Hillside Plow, Jumping Plow, single and double 
Shovel Plows, 2 5-tooth Harrows, pulverizing 
Roller, Corn Drills--- 1 and 2 row, Forks, Picks, 
Shovels, etc., good 2-horse Sled, Hinge Harrow, 
Iron Harrow, Disc Harrow, several new Gates, 
Fencing, 2 Wheelbarrows, 2 Lawn Mowers, 
Tools, etc., lot of Corn, Hay, etc., 3 Corn Shel- 
ters, Hog Scalding-box, Kettle, etc., Phaeton, sin- 
gle and double Buggy Harness, Bridle, Saddle, 4 
sets Work Harness, several Collars good as new. 



SOME HOUSEHOLD AND KITCHEN FURNITURE, 

Manure Spreader, two or three Log Chains, Several Tarpaulins, Horse Covers and Blankets, 
Sheep Clipping Machine. 



and a lot of Tobacco Sticks. 



TERMS OIF S.AXj. 

On sums of $10 and under, cash; on sums over $10 a credit of nine months 
without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved security* negotiable 
and payable in Union Deposit Bank, Union, Ky., before removing property. 

LUNCH FREE 

GEO. BURKITT, Auctioneer^ 



C. W. Lassing. 



Annual Statement 



Forty-Second Annual Report of the Farmers Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company of Boone County: 




Cash on hand January 1,1919 $ 101 41 

Income During 1919: 

Assessment and Policy Feet $3,350 73 

Lot sold _ 150 00 -3,500 73 

Total $3,602 14 

Expenditures for 1919: 

Losses Paid 2,552 60 

Salaries paid to officers and employes 664 50 

Taxes paid 15 40 

Borrowed money paid 201 00 

Printing and Supplies 74 77 

Total of all Expenditures 77T_ 3,507 77 

Cash Balance Jwutry 1, 1920. . $94 37 

N. C TANNER, President. 
R. B. HUEY, Secretary. 



On the night of the 83rd *"* • 
glmmer, Hi-own and VVitjgHtf will 

Sim* another »►( those delight Itil 
.iiii-fr. h( the Hebron hull Ml 
who attend will have a grand lime 
u» to always the rase on these 

OOCttMolk* 



J. fl. Reapess, of Florence, this 
county hna been appointed a mem 
ber of the Htate Racing Commis- 
sion by Governor dMorrow. Mr. 
Kcupoas to one of tho mo*t not* 
i.l (iiifmen of the country una 
hia appointment aa a member of 
the commission will give unlver- 
aal satisfaction among the racing 
pt-ople. 

Mayavllle -in.ra Oweue was in- 
dicted on the charge of having 
cuahed both a check for MO I auU 
another for MM. given to correct 
the first by BudQe * Co. (tnain- 
natl 



County Clerk Rogers ham com* 
pleted the recapitulation of the 
Tax Commissioner's . book lor 
this year. The increase in the to- 
tal valuation of property is IMor 
820 over that of last y^'- The 
value of farfn Implements and In- 
tangible property Is $l,0T8,i 6 On 
thla amount the county will col- 
iVet no revenue. Tho Increase In 
the value of lands la In roumd 
number 1*00,000 



James H. IMephana. of Hathaway 
neighborhood, dtod at paMSKttM 
Tuesday «!«"< 



SATISFACTIO 



It is worth a great deal to you to have a feeling 
of perfect satisfaction about the manner in which 
your financial business is handled* 

Let us take care of 'your business and you 7 be 
the judge as to whether or not it is properly 
handled. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

Capital $30,000. 
Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) $50,000 

We have a few more Farmers Account Books 

for dlHtrlbutlon among our patrons. 

CALL FOR ONE. 



FOR RENT. 

I will rent my farm to a good holi- 
es! man for $W0 cash, allow too for 
fencing or an/other aeoeaaary lui 
i.roveuiwiita. Write, ma If you mean 

,,U " URH. J, A HOUKHH. 

u inioh Break vllle, M-. 



WANTED. 

Men tu ralae tobacco <m iiew 
grow d anil work by |hl day wh«n 
not In it'" >ii>p 

\V A. UAINKM A HoV 
oftiiiH Hurllogtou, K I 

it D. i 



BOONB COUNTY RECORQE R 



\ 



. 



fifcsaf happenings. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rev.p. C. Peyton, D. D., Pastor. 
Preaching: every Sunday morning 

and evening. 
Bible School every Sunday at 10 a. 

m.~-Sam Allen, Superintendent. 
•fir' A cordial invitation is extended 
to all our services. 

Boom Co. Lutheran Pattorato 

Rev. Obo. A. Roykr, Paator. 
SUNDAY. JANUARY 18th, 1920, 

Hebron 10:110 a. m.— Hoiy Com 
muninn. Sermon by Pastor. 

Sunday School 3 p. in. 

All heartily welcomed to thene 
services. 



THE TOBACCO MARKETS. ™"*-jL R - p ~ fc 



NOTICE.— The examination for 
-Commo n 8ch o oi~Ptp1oinaH will be 
held at the Court House in Burling- 
ton, January 30 and 81. 

J. C. GORDON, Supt. 

Prepare your tobacco plant beds 
for burning. 

Ground hog day comes on Mon- 
day this year. 

Have you noticed that the days 
are getting longer? 

W. L. Kirkpatrick is remodeling 
the interior of his store. 



The growing wheat has fared 
pretty well so far this winter. 



Al Rogers, of Belleview, was 
transacting business in Burlington, 
Tuesday. 

Colonel Crislev is improving rap 
idly and expects to be in his shop 
in a few days. 

The town of Walton has been 
overrun with wagons loaded with 
tobacco for several days. 



Auiora, Ind., Jan. 10.— The Au- 
rora loose leaf tpfcacco ware- 
house sold today. 62,155 lbs., to- 
bacco at average of $36.95. Mar- 
ket very strong on bright tobac- 
cos, while the common grade* ad- 
vanced $1 and $2 per 100 pounds. 
The high basket today sold for 
$1.02 per pound. 

Shelbyville, Ky., Jan. 10— Dur- 
ing the past week 1,321,665 lbs*, 
of tobacco were sold on thlamar-i 
ket for ¥435,228.11, an average of 
$32.93. The sales for the season 
aggregate 5,016 910 lbs., for $1,889,- 
870.76, an average of $38.85. 

Madison, Ind., Jan. 10.— Sales on 
the local tobacco breaks this 
week totaled 484,495 lbs at an av- 
er a ge o f $31 .IL- Re ceip ta have been 
heavy all week and the demand 
has been *Vri3k. There was a 
slight slump in the market Wed- 
nesday and Thursday, but 



showed 



Bales 
a decided advance 



The census enumerators have 
been having some pretty tough 
weather since they began work. 

Judge Gaines went to Owemton. 
Owen county, last Monday to hold 
a two weeks' special term of cir- 
cuit court 



Tho heating system was put in 
order in time for the school" to 
resume work In the schoof build- 
ing last Monday morning. 

The boom In the price of to- 
bacco last week started the weed 
towards the markets pretty rap- 
idly tho first of this week! 



It will not be long until there 
is a change in the operation of the 
Burlington garage. It is nol 
known yet who will succeed Ed- 
dins Bros. 

Nice skating on the sidewalks 
in Burlington last Friday, and 
several of the boys and lirla took 
advantage of the occasion to In- 
dulge in the sport. 

The local truck men have been 
very busy the past week hauling 
tobacco and moving the personal 
effects of those who have pur- 
chased farms elsewhere. 



Friday 

on almost all kinds of tobacco, 
with a basket of fancy lugs sell- 
ing at $1.06, the high mark for 
the season. A number of growers 
with fancy crops received an av- 
erage of $70 to $79. 

Covinglon, January 12.— The first 
sale of the week in the Coving- 
ton loose leaf burley tobacco 
market was held this morning at 
the Kenton Warehouse with a to- 
tal offering of 75,410 pounds. It 
was stated after the sale that 
there was a large portion of low 
grades, which accounts for the 
comparatively low average for the 
day. Good to fine reo leaf and 
lugs seemed fully as strong aa 
last week, and all colory tobaccos 
were in good request at steady 
prices. Common smoker stock was 
weak, though not quotably lower 
in »prlee. Rejections for the day 
were rather free, totaling 16,620 
pounds, leaving an actual sale of 
58,820 pounds. Average $27.29 per 
100 lbs. Select leaf ran as high 
as 96 cents per lb„ while the com- 
mon sorts ranged downward as 
low as $5.40. 

Walton, Jan. 12.— The Farmers' 
Loose Leaf house sold 93,755 lbs., 
of tobacco today at an average 
of $33.93. There were very few 
rejections. The high price for 
the day was $1.02 a pound. There 
is enough tobacco at this house 
now for two more sale9. 

Covington, Jan. 13.— Altho light- 
er offerings prevailed in the Cov- 
ington loose leaf burley tobacco 
market today 'the break as a whole 
waa high in grade and the mar- 
ket displayed decidedly more an- 
imation than onM onday. Offerings 
totaled 47,585 pounds of which 
only 2,000 lbs, were rejected, leav 
ing an actual sale of 45,195 lbs. 

Aurora, Ind., January 13. — The 
Aurora Loose Leaf Tobacco Ware 
house Company sold today 76,261 
pounds of tobacco at an average 
of $40.50 perl 00 lbs. The floor con-; 
sisted principally of good tobac- 
co, which sold high, while the 
common grades did not show any 
material change in price. 



Harmony Lodge No. I2."», 1. O. O. F. 
Big Done, Ky.,Jan. I, 1920. 
Whereas, The Grand Manter of the 
Universe has seen fit iu His infinite 
wisdom to call from labor on earth 
to refreshments to that Celestial 
Lodge on high our beloved brother, 
James O. Pottinger, who depared 
this life January 7th. 1920; 

Whereas, Brother Pottinger was a 
member of Harmony Lodge No. 125, 
I. O. O F., also the Modern Wood- 
men of America, and a devout mem- 
ber of tho Methodist church; 

Whereas, Tho funeral was held 
from the HughesChapel M.E.church 
almost in sight of where ho lived a 
number of years a irreat number of 
hia sorrowing frienda paying tribute 
to his going away ; therefore be it 

Resolved. That the fraternity has 
lost one of its noblent character, the 
family, a loving husband and father, 
the community, one of its best clti- 
zens,and that we extend to the family 
our heartfelt sympathy in this their 
sad hour of bereavement, and com- 
mend them to Him who doeth all 
things well. 

Resolved, That a eopy of these 
resolutions be sent to the family a 
copy spread upon the records, and a 
copy be sent to the Boone Count* 
Recorder for publication. 

Committee i-'-Frank Allen. G. K. 
Hughes. 
(L. 8.) 



THURSDAY JAV. 16, 1920 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GEEATEST STORE. 




Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



PUBLIC SALE. 



I will «ell at my residence 1-K of a 
mile from Hopeful church. Boone 
county, Ky., beginning aH2 o'clock 
uoon, on ™ r 

Saturday, January 17th, 1920 

the following property; 
1 good work and driving Horse 
1 yearling Heifer 
1 spring Wagon 
1 Vulcan Chilled Plow 
A" Harrow 



1 

1 Hayrake 

1 Mowing Machine 



W. L. Whitehouse, who owned 
the Charles Sebree farm down on 
Woolper creek a few years 
sold it to a gentleman by 
name of William Mudman. 



Boone Post Will Give a Dance. 

The boys of the Hoone Post 

American Legion will give a dm -e 

nt Florence I. O. O P. Hall on 

Friday evening, Jan 23rd, 1920. 

has . The commute:* is endeavoring to 

the : make this an ideal social g.Ilher- 

| ing with chaperones in attendance 

and the best of music. They want 

it understood that it is not for 

members alone but fo<- their 

friends as well. 



Kenneth Stamper, 24, son of Bud 
Stamper, and Miss Nora Mae Mui- 
lins, 27, daughter of Frank Mul- 
lins, were married yesterday at 
Rev. C. E. Baker's in Belleiview. William Satchwill moved to his 

™> / \ Ii.diana home last Monday going 

John J. Moloney. Jr., a Pig l by way of Covington. Quite a 
Club Boy, of Erlangcr, won thlru | good sized colony of Boone's most 



Some Meat and Lard 
Household and Kitchen Furniture. 
Terms -Sums of $5.00 and under, 
cash; ou sums over $5^X)a credit of 
six months without interest, purch- 
aser to give note with good security 
Sayable in Peoples Deposit Bank, 
Turlington, Kv. 

"C. E. TANNER. 
Lute Bradford. Auctioneer. 



©[ossified Gduertisements. 



For Sale-FRESH MILK COWS 
AT ALL TIME9. 

CLAUD CONNER, 
LUDLOW R. D. 2, 
Near Pt. Pleasant church, Boone 
County, Ky aug. 20 



For Sale— Jersey cow and nice 
heifer calf five weeks old. \V S 
Acra, Burlington R. D. 3 



Lost— On Dixie Highway, Tues- 
day, a Ford rug. Finder will con- 
fer a favor by leaving it at my 
residence above Florence or at the 
Bethel Auto Sales Company, in 
Covington. 
P AUL BETHE L. 

Wanted— Man to raise tobacco 
and work by the day. Eunie Wil- 
lis, Burlington R. D. 1. 



Lost— Auto chaiin on pike be- 
tween Grant and Burlington on 
Jan. 12th. Finder will please re- 
turn ta -Walton Rice, Burlington 
R. D. 2. e 



Removal Sale of 

Rugs and Draperies 

The Greatest Value Giving Event This Department 

Has Ever Held. 



We're remodeling. The sensational growth of our entire store has necessitated the en- 
larging of#ur selling space. We are taking the entire third floor of our big budding, 
and in a/ew days the Rug and Drapery Section will move into "their new quarters on 
this flloor. But, we are not going to move a piece of merchandise that it is possible 
to sell before moving time. Therefore, the remarkable reductions on THE ENTIRE 
STOCK of Rugs and Draperies in this wonderful sale. Only a few of the items are 
mentioned here. 



9x12 Brussells Rugs $ 

Seamless Tapestry Brussells 
Rugs that sell regularly at $30. 
Splendid conventional designs. 



n 



.50 



$1.75 Scrim and Voile Curtains, 

Have pretty lace edges and some 
with lace insertings. Big special 
vaJue for this sale at pair 



$145 



1 



9x12 Brussells Rugs $ 

These are $45.00 Seamless Tap- 
estry Rugs in three beautiful de- 
signs. Splendid colorings. 



30" 



9x12 Velvet & Axminster Rugs$| 

Seamless and made Velvet and 
Axminster Rugs that are worth 
$55 and $60 today. Greatly rduced for this 
sale to $39.75. 



39" 



Irish Point, Duchess Point and French 
Sill Net Curtains. 

Choice of our entire stock. They sell regu- 
larly at $4.75 to $12.50 the pair. On sale 
at a reduction of 20 Per Cent. 



9x12 Ardsley Axminster Rugs- $ 

Genuine Ardsley Axminster rugs 
that we have been selling at $65 
though they are worth $70 today. Amaz- 
ing values in this sale at only $59.75. 



59" 



Odd Lot of Curtains Priced at 

Beautiful Curtains, one or two 
pairs of a kind, in voile, scrim, 
marquisette and lace. Regularly priced at 
$2.00 to $10.00 the pair. 



1-2 



35c Curtain Marquisette, yard 

Yard wide, in white, cream and 
ecru ; finished with tape border. 
Big value at yard 27c. 



27c 



Sheriff's Sale for lanes. 



prize in the November Letter 
Contest conducted by tho Pig 
Club Department of The Duroc 
bulletin. 



C. T. Claunch, the Eralnger Real 
Estate Agent, sold for W. IT. Goof 
ridge a farm of 125 acres on tho 
Dixie Highway, between Erlanger 
and Florence last week; to J. H 
Sanders, for #2-2,000. 



excellent people have gone to the 
Manchester. Indiana, section i;i 
the last few years. They ace all 
doing well and are pleased with 
their new home and thee- new 
neighbors. Joe Huey and one of 
Oullcy & Pctitt's trucks movfra 
him 

A company is being organized 
for the purpose of sinking wells 
in the neighborhood of Big Bono 
Springs to ascertain if oil exists 

have 



©♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦o#>«e 

• 

♦ BELLEVIEW. 
♦ 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦ « 

Wm. Rca of Patriot, Ind 
a caller here last week. 

Geo. Rice spent Tuesday 
with his brother Joshua 



The telephone lines between 
Limaburg and Hebron were hit ; j n that territory. Oil 
hard by the big sleet that camo looked that section over 
last Thursday night, numerous 

f>oles being broken off at tho 
op of the ground. 



i Simeon E. House, the old j>olit 



give it as their opinion 



and 
that />il 



will be found in paying quantifies * preservation for one that age. 
if those in search of it wiir go . The Citizens Deposit flank h"ln 



Notice is hereby given that I, or 
i one of my deputies will, on Monday, 
] February 2nd, 1920, it being County 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. m. cinci 3 o'clock p. m. at the Court 
j House door, in the town of Burling- 
! ton, Boone county, Ky., expose to 
4 j public sale for cash in hand, the fol- 
« lowing property, or so much thereof 
as may be necessary to pay State, 
. Cou nty and School tax due thereon 
J and unpaid for the year 1919, and the 
night i P eu *l tv i interest and costs thereon. 
For a complete description of 
Mrs. C. S. Smith is visiting rela- erfcy see Assessors Book for the as- 
tives in Union neighborhood s '.'. ssn V M1 . , i J or 19l8 > ttt t,,e County 

Mrs. James Smith, Sr., has bem 
OB the sick list the past week. 

Pepper Smith has opened his 
warehouse and has purchased a 
lot of tobacco the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kite, of Bur- 
lington, were the guests of Mr 
and Mrs. C. E. McNeely, Tuesday. 

™ V-rnnJf".^? 1 "^ H° lph "£2 I Carpenter. Mary A, town lot. 
son, Garnett, spent Sunday with r ,„V am' rt .„_ n tnt 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Fritz, in Ohio. I ' 

Mrs. Eliza Riddell reached her 

80th birthday Jan. 8th. She is 

aboye the average in health and 



Clerk's Office: 



L. A. CONNER. 
Sheriff Boone County. 



Burlington Precinct. 
Manning, Jasper, 4 acres, bnJ 

Florence Precinct. 
Robinson, J. C. n r 13 acres 




dee]) enough. The test made there- 
several years ago was only a sur- 



ical war hoss from Union, was a faes investigation and those who 
business viiitor to Burlington bat 
Monday. He is stayjng this win-, 
ter with John N. Crisler, of Long 
Branch, who is in poor health 



Rennker & Youell sold Iho small 
farm that Thomas Hensley bought 
of them to J. B. Arvin a few 
days ago at a nice profit. Mr. 
Arvin has rented tho residence 
Mr. Hensley bought of, J. W. Kel- 
ly in Burlington. 

County Attorney B. H. Rifev. 
and Atty. S. W. Toltn went to 
Rabbit Hash, Tuesday, to try 
John Hewitt, charged with violat- 
ing the compulsory educational 
law of the Stato. The trial re- 
sulted In the defendant being fl.i- 
ed five dollars and costs. 



The government is adverthing 
tor bids for carrying the U. a! 
Mail between Covington and Bur- 
lington for four years, commenc- 
ing the first. of next July. Ro- 
bert Rouse, the present carrier, Is 
filling out the eontrttet of John 
Conrad, and hia pay i» $1,700 par 
annum 

Tin- Recorder Is in receipt u 

article purporting to aavs he«n 
written mi Lexington, (his ' 
booming Common wealth'* tttoi 

ii« i John - 1 H«»v*e •» acuudlliite 

foi this dUti 

« li> tin .led to sl^n Ion 

(he m tide U tin i 
utils *> lit. i-<<il*tnlv lut.l in> i aiiMi 



fianced that work were never sat 
isficd that oil would not have 
been found had a well been sunk 
several hundred foet deeper. It is 
hoped that the Big Bone teirri- 
tory will be given a test that 
will settle the 'question and a 
flock of gusher.? will be brought 
in. 



its regular annual election Tues- 
day, Jan. 13th, 1920, and the same 
board of directors were retained 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Cason, 
Misses Laura Whitenack, Mazella 
Flick and Kathryn Maurer, arc 
Sunday dinner with Mr. and Mrs. 
James G. Smith. 



State News. 



So /far Boone county has shown 
very little disposition to assist in j in" this' aectionT'end 



the construction of the Federal 
Aid ro.-i I from Louisville to Cov- 
ington, and in so far as she U 
concerned the proposed highway 
will not come this way. It se.-m 
that Boone is about the only 
county iiiong the proposed rome 
that has not made a heroic effort 
to raise its oooifl to* (the work 
Boone has just spent the pro- 
ceed* of a two hundred thousand 
dollar lioiid issue in roads nnd'lhc 
results are not at all satisfactory, 
consi'iuently It will be iome time 
belore the county will fay down 
another Urge sum «»." > y for 

public roads, Th ■ i\ pi ii, nc" thll 
coumy his ha. I it wort^tb* cost, 
and a different road i.>h(ciu Will 

kui o i" prevail In her jurlidictlo i 

lulore inaiiv mom' milt i ol pi l< ' 
me huiil .it the public CxpttMC 



\ 



h 



1 1 iK'" dl i 

in MkllhAflfta t hat i 

v , l N i.it.il Hid l>«|f(ting 1 Ill- 
tin la Hi till' I, III 



Hickman— The Newberry O ) f'o 
will spend $150,000 in search of oil 

will begin 
drilling the first well this week 
Winchester — Wheat suffered 
thru washing rains of laRt week 
roots being exp »sed to subsequent 
Treezes. 

Hazard— The Council has gone 
on record, with what is called a 
blue law, torbidding ferrying for 
toll across North Fork on Sun- 
day. 

Lonlsvillo— Threat <>f a church 

strike is seen by some in the re- 
cord Outpouring to theaters fol- 
lowing the agnation by ministers 
for Sunday closing of movies, 

Athland The l-Uril Con ( ap- 
proprl iu I tin, ''ii a i «mi- for ttt i 

\ in s to make H{i\ I i mill \ m 
'ill ttnu'' health unit 

V ItenttOfl k oi P '■ Mi etiiiK 

Ing H iliinl it nlghl J III ill Us* 

u <> I, i i . Kould 

I I I'KI'lli 



Constance Precinct. 
1 Phelps, LewiB, n r, town lot 

j Russ, James, town lot 

I Zitnmer. B. F., town lot 

Petersburg Precinct. 
I Jsrrell, Lewie, n r, town lot. 
Lawrenoeburg Ferry, town lot. 
balance due 

Bulllttsvllle Precinct. 
Anderson, E. M. n r town lot 

Belleview Precinct. 
Wingate, L, n r, 19 acres. . . 
Wilson, Elizabeth, town lot 
Hamilton Precinct. 

Rice, Erastus, 2 acres 

Union Predict. 
Rusk, Wayne, n r, !K) acres 




DIRECT DEALING PAYS BEST. 

When cream it ready to icll, the hard work has been done and you should 
• not permit any outsider to make an extra profit off your efforts. 
You can skip your cream DIRECT to the Tri- State and save from 3 to 
5 ct*. per lb. of butter-fat. It is just as easy to deliver the Cream to a rail- 
road station as to a buying station. The Tri-State pays the freight and 
guarantees your cream against loss in transit. 

Mrs. Thoi. Daulton, Peebles. O., writes on Nov. 25, 1919-"I have shipped 
cream to the Tri-State Butter Co. for three years and have been satisfied. 
I have sold cream to cream stations in order to return the empty can with 
me, as I live 9 miles from the railroad and always lost from $1.50 to $2.00 
on every can of cream sold to agents." i 

We Pay the 
Freight and 

per pound for butter fat 

week Jan. 12th to 18th, inclu sive. 

The Tri-State Butter Co 

CASH CAPITAL $250,000.00. CINCINNATI, O. 

If you need cans, write for Free Trial Cans. 
35,000 cream producers find it most profitable to ship direct. 



10,68 
."..HO 



•_';{.; I 






I ut«* 



i» till, > 



Hoi ii trt« i nil lust 

in. I .» He 
in Mr an I Mi it Ml 



(Hit 



t > i 



PRIVATE SALE 

of Furniture consisting of 

I living room Suite of Davinette 
Chair. Rocker and Library Table 
iu Walnut, upholstered in genuine 
brown leather. New 

I Dlniiur Table and Chairs iu Jaco- 
bean finished Oak. New. 

1 Royal Milton Rug «xl2. N< w. 

I Pressed Milton Rug 9x1$. New. 

10 yards Linoleum. NVvt . Never 
t'l-en used. 

I Uedrooin Suite. OaL. 
Collie and sre theiu. 

J. K. < \SON. 

LexJufion Plkt i- laim n oppoalte 
Mrs ci..,k*. 

FOR SALE. 

— -• — 

Rubber tire Uaggy, good an n 

• In use in 1 1> tear n tt It painted 
(iOllltON I \IU 

inn I,, $3) r 'I. n. -in .< K t 



lAfctt \Oi II i 



DID YOU KNOW 

That— This is the largest country bank in Northern 
Kentucky and where your surplus funds are ab ; 
solutely safe. 

That- --We pay 3 per cent interest ; also your taxes 
""" on deposits. 

That---We serve about 1,000 people. 

That— Our Safe— The Mosler Corliss— is the strongest 
safe made. 

That- --We want you to use this bank in every way 
in which it will be a benefit to you. 

That -WHEN BETTER SERVICE IS POSSIBLE, 
THIS BANK WILL RENDER IT. 
If you are not a customer, call in and talk matters 
over with us. We know you will be a benefit to 
us and trust that we can be of some service to you. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky, 

Resources Over Half Million Dollars. 

W. L B. ROUSE. President. A. B. RENAKER, fnkkn 

EDGAR C. RILEY, Vice-Pros. 
NELL H. MARTIN, Asit. Cashier. L T. UTZ, Assl. C.hier. 




70c 

: B^ 



-m 



DO YOU TAKI. I III. Rl.COKDhK 

Try It One Year - You'll Like It. 
Only $1.50 the Year 

■ + ♦♦*.,, + *♦♦♦♦♦ '«ar > »«••«»• full to H»«U All lh» Ait* In I Hiss I 



THURSDAY JAN. 16, 1920 



auONB COUNTY RECORDER 



^PilY 




ORGANIZE FOR BETTER HERDS 




CARE OF BACK- YARD POULTRY 



Farmers Forming Associations for 

Purpose of Introducing Bulls of 

Merit of Single Breed. 

(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 
Tbe co-operative bull .association Is 
an effective organization for freeing a 
Community from the exasperating ex- 
perience of die scrub bull that roams 
at lnrpe. There is Bcnreejy a breeder 
who lias not experienced keen disap- 
pointment and financial loss through 
unrestrained scrub hulls. In tlio ter- 
ritory covered by a co-operative bull 



Phase of Home Production That 

Should Be Considered by Those 

Desiring Eggs and Meat. 




- A Purebred Jersey. 

association In one state only one scrub 
bull was found where, prior to the 
organization of the association, there 
had been 30 scrub bulls. The 30 
scrubs have been replaced with five 
registered built*. The organization of 
farmers Into an association for the 
purpose of introducing bulls of merit 
of a single breed nnd the elimination 
of the scrub bull signifies that a 
definite plan for community herd im- j 
provement has been agreed upon. 

There is at present a widespread to- ! 
terest on the part of Individual farm- j 
ers in herd Improvement through the 
use of better sires. The winter sea- 
son affords an opportune time to dis- 
cuss the subject with one's nelehbors 
and to perfect the organization of 
snch an association. Farmers 1 Bui- j 
letin 993, "Co-operative Hull Associa- j 
tions." which may be Secured through 
application to the United States de- j 
partment of agriculture, gives infor- 
mation regarding these associations 
and practical methods of forming one. 



(Prepared by the I'liiler! St.ites Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 

The keeping of fowls on a towu lot 
or in the back yard is a phase of home 
prodUCtton that Shotth] be considered 
lij :'.ll who desire to supply the table 
with eggs and meat at a cost eonsid- 
i rably below the usual market price. 
Ordinarily, the keeping of from V2 to 
Si hi us is MiiJ'.ciriii iii provide the 
average faniltj with ejrgfl and meat. 
lor a iio-k of :ir> In :;s a space of from 
2Q to DO :i|i:are feel per bird should 
allowed, and the yard BO divided 
US to pern:;! lhem to be alternated 
from one yard to the other. Thus, a 
lo; of 2"> by .".(> fe»i. which is even 
smaller than the average town lot, 
should he the minimum space for a 
Hock of this size. By having the 
yard divided cover crops, such as 
wheat, on is. rape, or rye, can be 
growing in tlie unused yard and 
when sufficiently prown the fowls be 
allowed to pasture it. 

For a yard 28 by 30 feet, or 750 
square feet In size, the above-men- 
tinned grains may be sown in the fol- 
lowing amounts : Wheat. 2',^ pounds ; 
oats, l^j pounds; rye. 3*4, pounds; 
rape, 2 1 ^ ounces. When available, 
l.iwn clippings make excellent green 
feed for fowls. 

In this way the contamination of 
(he soil and the possibility of disease 
are reduced to a minimum, and at 



TO PRODUCE BETTER HEIFERS 



Carefully Select From Herd Profitable 

Producing Cows and Use 

Purebred Sire. 

Proper feeding of balanced rations, 
elimination of unprofitable animals in 
the herd and increasing production by 
use of purebred dairy aires to produce 
better dairy heifers are the three Im- 
portant things that will decrease the 
cost and increase the production of 
dairy products, says the dairy hus- 
bandry extension man at Iowa State 
college. 

The easiest and most practical way 
of obtaining cows of better dairy 
qualities is to select carefully from 
the herd those cows which are found 
bj record to be profitable producers 
and use on these a purebred dairy 
sire. If the profitable cows are select- 
ed, then the dairyman will bo able ta 
make a profit while he is building up 
a dairy herd. 

It pays to select and breed better 
animals because it means more pay 
foi tbe amount of labor and feed used 
nnd also an increased production of a 
food which is absolutely essential. 




INDICATIONS OF GOOD COW 



Best Dairy Animal Has Large Middle 

Body, Strong Constitution and 

Perfect Health. 

The best dairy cow has a large mid- 
dle body, a strong constitution and per- 
fect health. A large ndder and good 
sized teats, large milk wells and prom- 
inent veins are indications of a good 
milker. There are many other points 
to be taken into consideration when 
breeding for results, but In addition to 
■silk tests, If the cow Is welUbodled 
and built for a milker, as may be 
judged from ft common sense view, 
that ought to he sufficient evidence of 
.dairy value. 



A Suitable Type of Poultry House for 

the Town Poultry Keeper Whose 

Space Is Limited. 

the same lime green food is provided. 
The actual selection of the breed 
should not be a difficult matter when 
one considers rhiit more depends upon 
the way fowls are managed than upon 
the breed itself. Purebred fowls of 
the general-purpose or >■-,: lype pur- 
chased for a reasonable figure are well 
sailed for backyard poultry plants. 
However, when pure-bred fowls can 
r.ot be obtained, grades properly cared 
for and fed will usually produce suf- 
ficient eggs and meal for the lable 
of the a ve rage f amily. 



SENSIBLE TREATMENT OF HEN 



Indispensable Requirements for Suc- 
cess Are Comfortable Quarters 
and Good Feed. 



SEPARATOR SHOULD BE CLEAN 

Only Way to Secure Highest Efficiency 

of Machine and Best Quality of 

Product. 

The cream separator should be kept 
clean If the highest efficiency of the 
machine and the best product Is to 
be obtained. After ench separation the 
bowl should be Hushed out by pouring 
Into the supply can about two ipiitrts 
Dt lukewarm water The parts ehoald 
pan be washed with warm water and 
riaiM-d in scalding water, utter which 
they should be allowed to dry la the 



It makes no difference to a canary 
whether it is kept in a cage that cost 
$10 or 10 cents, or whether it has Its 
feed and drink in china or earthen 
dishes; but it makes an Immense dif- 
ference whether it lias food care or 
Is neglected, and whether or not its 
Hi eels are properly supplied. Thpse 
things are equally true of a ben. 
Sensible treatment is of far ureater 
Important:*! than stylish quarters. 
A tine equipment should not be de- 
pised. It can be so' used as to he 
ol hi eat value. Still It is not one 
vl flic vital tbinps. The indispensable 
requirements for success in the poul- 
try business are good slock; comfort- 
able and healthful quarters; feed and 
drink of good quality, in proper quan- 
tity and at Hultahle times; and full 
protection from i!i enses and em mien. 

WOID SOUR OR MUSTY FOOD 



Texture •* Butter. 
tt*e grata or tenure of the batter 
Is aS t rt ei 1 and coulrulMI la»e»l| by 
the treatment arhbh the buttei 
eeltea tltulaa t*e waafclnf and wurklu* 



/ere Ld 


Will Hfi&ult From Use 


of Poor 


rttii During Hot Days 




of Summer. 


1 | 1 


oi w 'h ti, or musty 
J for j mil 




HVeru 

i i 




. ths 




«' i In the 




• been 'brie for 




i ito*. portions 



patiznc:: is chief BEraaND. 



Wild Animal lamer Must Proceed 
Slowly in His Mastery of Natural- 
ly i-avage Spirit. 

The tamer of wild beasts uses 
no secret methods of magic spoils. 
In fact such a 'tamer proce-eda 
very much as child would in 
taming a wild kitten. If a lion 
is to be taught to ride on horse 
back, for instance, it is necessary 
to be very patient at first and 
take a great deal of time. If 
possible, it is best to begin when 
ithe best is young— less than a year 
old. He was born in captivity ; he 
is already accustomed to seeing 
peraons outside his cage, but not 
inside. All his instincts are fierce. 

When the trainer first opens 
the cage door and steps inside the 
youngster at once displays fear. 
He will probably jump at the 
trainer, snarling savagely, for that 
is his way of showing alarm. The 
only course that can be pursued 
is to beat him off with a light 
club, but the first lesson for 
him to learn is that it is not 
safe for him to attack men. 

The trainer does not follow 
him, but sits quietly down on a 
box or a chair inside the cage, 
^paying no particular attention to 
the beast. He sits there for an 
hour or two — sometimes throe- 
hours— at a stretch This is done 
to accustom the lion to the pres- 
ence of a man in its eago ana 
to wear out the beast's natural 
fear and fierceness. The first les- 
son is repeated on the following 
day, and is continued for a month. 

Next the trainer takes a piece 
of meat into the cage, and, wait- 
ing until the lion is hungry, offers 
it on the end of a long stick. 
Very likely the lion will not touch 
it at first, perhaps not for 
many days; or, if he siezesit, his 
manner will not be such as to 
indicate thankfulness. But by pa- 
tience and perseverance he will 
be induced by and by to come 
and take his food from the stick, 
and eventually from the trainer's 
hand. Not infrequently he will 
try to bite the hand that offers 
the meat, but, generally speaking, 
it is deemed a decided victory 
when a young lion will voluntar- 
ily approach and take his food 
from the keeper's hand. 

Soon after this he will alupw 
the trainer to stroke his head. 
Toward a stranger he may ex- 
hibit nearly or quite as much 
ferocity as at first. 

The next step te to put a 
chain around the young fellow's 
neck and lead him about the cage; 
and most trainers deem it neces- 
sary to bind a lion down to the 
bottom of the cage once or 
twice to instill into his naturally 
intractable mind the fact that 
human bonds are irresistib'e and 
that chains cannot l>e broken. 

The various feats constituting a 
performing lion's education are 
afterward taken up by one, and 
taught gradually. The only secrets 
that the lion tamer knows are 
endless patience and oft-repeated 
lessons. Needless cruelty is al- 
ways avoided; nevertheless, it is 
necessary that lions as well as 
tigers, leopards and most other 
wild beasts, should be in fear of 
their keepers. 

There is almost or quite as 
much difference in young lions as 
in boys. Some are much more do- 
cile and intelligent than others. 
Some develop good and trust- 
worthy traits; others prove refrac 
torv and can never be fullv trust- 
ed 



PESTILENCE CAUSED BY WAR. 

Generally Understood That the Influ- 
enza Epidemic Wis a Direct 
Result of Great Conflict- 
Sufficient time has not yet elap 
sed to determine the indirect ef- 
fects of the recent eruption of 
Mount Kiloet in Java which wiped 
out over a score of villages and 
killed thousands of the natives, 
but recollections of Krakatoa's 
volcanic outburst in 1883 which 
within six weeks sprinkled its fine 
lava dust over the whole world, 
has given an interesting sugges- 
tion to certain members of the 
medical profession. During the 
closing year of the year of the 
war an influenza epidemic raged 
in many parts of the world. The 
manner of its outbreak in differ- 
ent countries indicated that the 
germs of the disease had been 
conveyed by the currents in the 
air. The theory, therefore, has 
been broached that the poison 
gases with which many sectors of 
the fighting area were drenched 
were carried by the wind in ev- 
ery direction, causing the influ- 
enza outbreak in Spain, Germany, 
England, Prance, South America, 
Australia, Africa, Asia, as well as 
in the United States and some of 
the Central American countries. 
That the influenza is a corollary 
of the war is undoubted. Any 
similar gigantic conflict, is argu- 
ed, would be attended with a sim i 
ilar widespread pestilence— anoth- 
er reason why every effort should 
be made to avert wars in the fu- 
ture—Leslie's. 

SQUEEZED 
TO DEATH 

W>.n the body begins lo stiffen 
an- novomeot becomes painful it 
ic CifitiaUy en indication that the 
1 ■:-• ieys, trc out of order. K^ep 
i ---' organ j hcaithy by taking 

GOLD MEDAL 




Out of accumulated capital btvc arwtn all I ha tu 
of induttry and upplird •rieoccall Use romforU aad aaxlt- 
orations of Ibe common lot. Upon it tbe world mutt depend 
for tbe nrona of m-onit ruction is which all ban to inara, 

-nl AMIES i. HILL. 



The Successful Farmer 
Raises Bigger Crops 

and cuts down costs by investment in 
labor-saving machinery. 

Good prices for the farmers* crops en- 
courage new investment, more production 
and greater prosperity. 

But the success of agriculture depends 
on the growth of railroads — the modern 
beasts of burden that haul the crops to 
the world's markets. 

The railroads — like the farms — increase 
their output and cut down unit costs by 
the constant investment of new capital. 

With fair prices for the work they do, 
the railroads are able to attract new capital 
for expanding their facilities. 

Rates high enough to yield a fair return 
will insure railroad growth, and prevent 
costly traffic congestion, which invariably 
results in poorer service at higher cost. 

National wealth can increase only as our 
railroads grow. 

Poor railroad service is dear at any 
price. No growing country can long pay 
the price of inadequate transportation 
facilities. 



Dhiiy adverfoemmt ikpubUdiedbyiHe 

Those dtriring information concerning the railroad situ- 
ation may obtain literature by writing to The Associa- 
tion of Railway Executive*. 61 Broadway, New York. 




Satisfactory Glasses 




Our glasses' are comfortable when 
fitted, and we keep them so for you 
free qi charge. Any time they get 
bent or out of shape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 

Phone South 1746 



DR. N. F. PENN,6i3 MadiIin H Av7. C ^Covtagtoii. Ky 




CH 



LUTE BRADFORD 

-♦AUCTIONEER- 

Is well posted on prices, has a wide acquaintance ana 
knows all the good buyers. 

Live Stock Sales a Specialty 

Can Give all the Reference You Want. 

Farmers Phone. TERMS REASONABLE. 

(3 FLORENCE, KY., R. D. 





. : .-.. K .. l ..K-+*++*+***+++++++++* ♦* > ♦ ♦ » ♦» M M » # »♦ < I ♦ II I * * » ■ * 

ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 
Subscribe for the Recorder. 

A4.AA4.4.4.4.4^+++4.+++4.+*++4'++*f+++++4++++++++ 



■ iwtv i -a j nyi ii 

i.aaiiti i i three u«m. •' 

' a* >*|>rwMtiiwtl 

l M l.l ,n av «/* la* 

AaAefAaaA aMk UaaVtaaaaAwaWfe 



Wanted. 

Man with small family to raise 
tobacco and work by the day. 
U. I) SOUTHER, 

Burlington K. D. 3, Consolidated j 
phone. ..|-n>22 

CallettabuTf -Then' I* »u night 

watch at th* city prison, «"«' 

K vane, Loulaa, and A Oivena, 

und, aetttaea «>' lakUi* an 

•utVHnobll*. worked (without 

.it when they prlied th '*' 
way to freedom 



NOTICE. 

All tho*« indebted to the Rurling- 
I..M mid Waterloo Tolphooo Co. on 
aeoount Of box renl oi Hwitisii dual 
must pay tha aami to w. h. M»r- 

Hhnll, 8ecretnrv, Vo.ro Jitmiary 10, 
lir.u IIUHKItT WIIITK, 

ojnn I 'Mi President. 

Wanted To Buy Farms. 

Any hI»« ..r location. Oaah buyers 
f.n all aiuda. Hetid oie IUt, slae 
end |>il' 

Wm. K. M\IUI>. 

Krlenger, Ky 



f. i. Kassebaum & Ss„, 

I (UNITE < MiRBLB 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large Btoch on Display I] 
to 8«Uct from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 




IG 



Sales and Service 



19 E. Seventh St, 

| COVINGTON, 

e 
e 

: 

e 



KY. • 
CLYDE BARLOW, S 



General Manager. 



e 
e 



D. E. CastlemaTi, 
ATTORNEY AT LA W t 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 

WANTED 

Boone County farms to sell. Ad- 
dress W. E. VEST, 
First Nat. Bank Building, 

Covington, Ky 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Bedding 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



White Oak Stock Farm 




now has on hand April farrowed pigs 
both sexes; will be ready for ship- 
ment when 8 to 10 weeks old. Those 
are the. Big Bone and smooth type, 
the kino that makes the show hog. 
Prices Reasonable — Pedigrees Free. 

FRANK HAMMOND, 
R. D. 1, Florence, Kv. 

Con. Phone 229. inaBtf 



o\\\\v\\\\\\v>> 



I 



Why 
Suffer? 

Mrs. J. A. Cox, of Al- 

derson, W. Va., writes: 
"My daughter . . . suf- 
fered terribly. She could 
not turn in bed . . . the 
doctors gave her up, and 
we brought her home to 
die. She had differed so 
much at . . . time. Hav- 
ing heard cf Cardui, we 
got It for her." 





/ m The Woman's Tonic 

r. "In a few days, she be- 

/ gan to Improve." Mrs. 

/ Cox continues, ''and had 

y no trouble at . . . Cardui 

V cured her, and we sing 
rM its praises everywhere. 

We receive many thou- 
sands of similar letters 
every year, telling of the 
y good Cardui lias done for 

V women who suffer from 
?A complaints so common to 
r>€ their sex. It should do 

;00d ' t0 °* E-fi \? 






i 



| 



* \*SS&*WaWW(g* 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦e 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 
Watch the date following 
your name on the margin 
of your paper and if it ia 
not correct please notify 
thia office at once. If your 
paper has been ill»<<>iillnu- 
ed by mistake before your 
Unit* expired do not delay 
notifying this office. All sr- 
rora of cheerfully correct- 
ed here. 



e 
e 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

e 
♦ 

e 
♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



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HuUti 



or the IV. 



HDU*. 



mm 



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mmmimwmimwmWmwmmmmmmmmmwm^mM 



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■■■ 



■■ 



TJVURSD VY JAN. 16, 1920 



BOONE C-LC7NTV RECC^TlFi? 



Wf>. 5 



* 



NEVER SAW fHE SUWANEE 

Writer of Popular Song Used Name 

Because Rhythmic Sound of It 

Appealed to Him. 

The song, "Old Kolka nt Home," 
mnde the name of "Swanee Itlver" far 
mous, but few people, except those of 
Florida and Georgia, connect the 
Swanee of the song with the Suwanee 
that flows from the southern swumps 
of Georgia down through the wood- 
lands of Florida to empty Into the Gulf 
of Mexico. 

"Way down upon the Swanee river" 
suggests vaguely the South of the ante- 
bellum days with Its cotton plantations, 
Its mansions and negro cabins. None 
of these things are found along the Su- 
wanee. Yet Florldans claim that the 
song was written In honor of their for- 
est stream, and boatmen even point 
out a tree under which Stephen Fos- 
ter Is supposed to have penned the 
memorable lines. Reports less pic- 
turesque, but more generally accepted, 
ray that Foster never saw Suwanee 
river, but that he used the name he- 
cause of the rhythmic sound, dropping 
the "u" to perfect the mVter. 

While the SuV.imee river may not 
be what Its nana suggests to most of 
us, It Is a beautiful stream, flowing 
through a sernl-troplcul country where 
live-oaks and cypresses are mirrored 
In Its cleat depths. Heavy forests of 
cedar also grow in Its valley, hut these 
have been reduced in recent years, as 
the wood Is In great demand for pen- 
cil making. 

The* Stiwnnee figured largely in 
early American history, for It was a 
favorite haunt of tiie Indians, and 
many battles with the red men were 
fought in Its valleys. 

The name Suwanee has an Indian 
sound, hut It is Mild to be a corrup- 
tion of San .Tuna — a name given the 
riverby early Spanish explorers. 



CHINA NOT LAND OF HUSTLE 



Traveler in That Country Mu at Possess 
a Generous Amount of Patience 
and Tact ' 

Sooner or later, writes K. II. Wilson 
in "A Naturalist in Western China," 
the traveler in China must dispense 
with the comforts and luxuries of 
modern occidental methods of travel 
and adapt himself to those more primi- 
tive and decidedly less cotnfortuhle of 
the oriental. 

In the regions with which we have 
to deal there Is nothing In the nature 
of wheeled vehicular truffle save only 
tiie rude wheelbarrows in use on the 
('hengtu plain. There are no mule 
caravans, and scarcely a riding pony 
to be found. For overland travel there 
is the native sedan-chair and one's own 
legs; for river travel the native boat. 

Patience, tact and abundance of 
time are necessary and the would-be 
traveler lacking any of these essentials 
should seek lands where less primitive 
methods obtain. Endowed with the vir- 
tues mentioned, and having unlimited 
time at his disposal, he may travel 
anywhere ami everywhere In China In 
safety, with considerable pleasure and 
abundant profit In knowledge. With 
her Industrious tolling millions, her old, 
old civilization, her enormous natural 
wealth and wondrous scenery, China 
alternately charms and fascinate*. Irri- 
tates and plunges into despair, all who 
sojourn long within her borders, 



Elephants' Picnic. 
An act not down on the program 
was given Without charge the otlier 
day In the old seaport town of Marble- 
head. Mas*., when four elephants of a 
small Circus, named with line allied 
patriotism General Foch, Generni Per- 
shing, General Ilalg and Princess Pat, 
jumped a stone wall, escaped the cir- 
cus and took to the woods. The per- 
sonnel of the circus, acrobats, riders, 
clowns and canvasmen, followed, and 
so did many of the townspeople and 
half a dozen policemen, but. the ele- 
phants made the woods first, and there 
they spent (he day with "a large and 
appreciative audience" watching on 
the outskirts. Peanuts and bananas, 
usually a temptation to elephants, 
fulled to entice them from their New 
England jungle; but as twilight fell, 
and habit suggested feeding time, the 
idg beasts came peacefully out of the 
woods anil allowed the trolner and his 
assistants to lend them back to the 
circus grounds. Anil nil Mnrblehend 
went home to belated suppers. 



\ 

Germany Seeks Wool Substitutes. 
Search for wool substitutes will 
doubtless continue In Germnny, where 
sheep rearing is not likely to Increase 
materially. Dogs' hair and even hu- 
man hair have been tried, as felt ma- 
terial of limited supply, and the long 
hair of women found military use dur- 
ing the war. A possible new Industry 
is to be based on the white, silken- 
haired rabbit. The hair mijs - he spun 
Into very line soft threads, suitable for 
wenving certain fabrics, and plans are 
said to have been made for breeding 
several millions of the animals. 



Oil in Mexico. 
Recent Investigations which have 
been made on (he Pacific coast of Mex- 
ico reveal the ftxtste&cs of rich de- 
posits of petroleum. ThtM discoveries 
arc of great Importance, because they 
will ultimately serve to Intensity mari- 
time traffic ami seem to presage for 
some of the western ports of Mexico 
a future an promising ns that of 
Tiiiiipbo or Tiupaum. 

Simple Budget System, 

wife should have a 

lunik govern htfl i ■• pciull 

I know I have one | p n y what I 
cau and owe ibe rest 



Horticultural 




BEST SOIL FOR STRAWBERRY 



Good Drainage la Important and 

Abundant Humus la Essential to 

Profitable Yields. 

Strawberry shortcake would soon 
become a thing of the past If all straw- 
berry plants were set in poorly drained 
soil. While ntrawberi les can be grown 
successfully on a wide variety of soil 
types, good drainage is necessary, and 
abundant humus is essential to good 
yields. Methods of growing and han- 
dling strawberries In the South Atlan- 
tic and Gulf Coast regions, where the 
climate is mild and the plants grow 
during nearly the entire year are dif- 
ferent, in Many respects from (hose in 
oilier parts of the country. These 
regions ship over u,r.o<) carloads an- 
nually. 

Soil must be selected that Is espe- 
cially well drained. This, is particu- 
larly important in the South, where 
much of the land is low and often 
poorly drained. Linf, root, and fruit 
diseases are favored by poorly drained 
sites. There Is uu particular type of 
soil to which strawberries are best 
adapted. Fine sandy to heavy gumbo 
soils are used. Preparation of the 
land for planting should be thorough. 
If sufficient animus js not already pres- 
ent, heavy duplications of manure 
should be made, or, if this is not avail* 
able, some green-manure crop should 
be grown ou the land for a season and 
then turned under before setting the 
plants. 

Nematodes, also called gallworms 
and eel worms, are a serious jnennce to 
southern strawberry growers. They 
are most abundant where the soil 
rarely or never freezes to consider- 
able depth, and are more injurious In 
sandy than in heavy soils. Where 
available, new hind or that known to 
be free from nematodes should be 
used for strawberries. Common crops 
und plants known to be imninne or 
very resistant to this parasite, such ns 
corn, sorghum, winter oats, rye, pearl 
millet, velvet beans, peanuts, and a 
few others should Ik planted in rota- 
tion with strawberries, Many growl- 
ers find it to their advantage in com- 
bating nematodes to secure plants 
from nor' Item nurseries each year, 
anil set tin :n In their plantations dur- 
ing the winter months about every 
four feet apart in the rows. 

The manner of handling these 
[Jnnls, sometimes called "mother 
plants," Is to set them In January, 
February, or March. They will start 
growing at once, ami by June will de- 
velop enough runner plants to cover a 
considerably incrensi d area. By Au- 
gust these runrjer plants are ready for 
aetting fti a more extended nrea, and 
by October or November they In turn 




-$ '-J* -S -5: '-3 '-2 ~~ ~2 



3 



Excellent Field of Strawberries. 

will have developed «ther- runners 
which should be enough to form a 
main fruiting plantation. The exact 
timed'nr making (he original planting 
and the several transplantlngs of the 
runner plants varies in different lo- 
calities and with weather conditions. 

Generally two planting systems are 
used In the South— the hill system and 
the matted-row system. Under th>» 
hill system the plants are commonly 
set In Inle sunnnrc or autumn, and 
f he crop Is harvested i:> the winter or 
the following spring. Usually plants 
set nt that time make no runners, but 
If any do appear they are removed. 
When this system is used the plant! 
are sot In single, double, or triple 
rows, ' 

Whatever method is used two things 
are of special Importance: Betting live 
plants at the right thpth and u;iUu : 
the soil verv firm about the roots. The 



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T'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 




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Hud»on Speedster $2315 40. 
Essex Touring $1588. 

Essex Roadster $1588. 

Dodge Touring $1175. 

Dodge Coupe $1867. 

Dodge Sedan $2025. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above prices ere delivered at your door. 

If you want to place an order for any of these 

call 

B. B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. 



ii) 

to 
to 
to 

to 
to 

to 

to 
to 
to 
to 
to 

m 

VtV 



cars, 



W-A-N-T-E-D 

Beech, Sycamore, Maple, 
Oak and Walnut Logs. 

If you Imve any to sell write to 

C. C. MENGEL & BRO. CO. 
Louioville Kentucky 



I 



KITCHffl 





A clear soup, a bit of fish, a couple 
of entrees and a nice little roast. 
That's my kind of a dinner.— Thack- 
eray. 




112 Millions 
used last year* 
to KILL COLDS 

HILL'S 

cascaraENuinin 

Standird cold remedy for 20 years 

—in tablet form — safe, sure, do 

piatei — breaks up a cold in 24 

hours — relieves erip ia 3 days. 

Money back it it faili. The 

genuine box has a Red 

lop with Mr. Hill's 

picture. 

At All Drum &tr« 





WARM WEATHER FOODS. 

Today with markets teeming with 
■It kinds of fruit and veRernbles and 
housewives effi- 
cient in canning; 
greens from their 
gardens, one niny 
expect to be as 
healthy In the 
spring as at any 
other time of the 
year, for our 
blood tonics ore taken In the form of 
fruit and vegetables. 

However, when the warm days of 
summer come, they bring a muscular 
relaxation which reacts upon the di- 
gestive trnct ns well ns upon the 
whole body and It needs to have its 
task lightened, so we lessen the 
amount of food or serve the lighter 
forms of food. Foods rich in fat such 
as pastries, cakes and various sauces, 
should be partnken of in moderation. 

Protein foods which furnish the 
heat should be cut down ami more of 
the succulent fruits and vegetables 
form the main bulk of the food. 

In the warm weather the housewife 
must plan more accurately not to have 
much leftover food, for spoilage will 
occur In a few hours In protein food, 
making it unfit to serve. 

When very warm a cold drink In 
the form of a plain soda or phosphate 
is much less harmful than a soda or 
a sundue. 

Ice creams und sundaes tuken at the 
end of a meal will not chill the stom- 
ach unduly. 

In planning food for hot days it is 
wise, because of the habit, to serve 
one hot dish, even a drink, as a too 
radical change in meals cannot al- 
ways be borne. 

If one's dinner is eaten at noon the 
supper should have nt leust one hot 
dish, simple but wholesome — a cream- 
ed meat on buttered toast, milk toast, 
macaroni and Cheese, or bread and 
Cheese custard made by spreading 
Mlioeg of breud with butter, putting 
them llttu a baking dish and cover- 
ing Willi Pllo fgg tq euch cup of milk, 
tkl amount depeudilig upon the uum- 
!)«r to be werved, Over euclj slice of 
brMd UU ii IsTHReed, p»t a generous 
Infer - of fh'll finely dh^d phecoe. Bate 
In n modcraip even u»UI Hit custard 

Is Dpi, 

FIRST CLEAN UP THE MESS 

■ '■ ' e 

British Major's Attitude on the War 

Typical of Most of the Soldiers 

"Over There." 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All Calk Promptly Attended. 

Twenty-one years Practice. 
Phone 733 WALTON, KY. 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

v^DENTIST^-* 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work — 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



Now is the time Mr. Farmer for you to think 
of the seed you are going to plant this winter. 

WHAT ARE,YOU GOING TO PLANT? 
HOW MANY ACRES WILL YOU SOW? 

What kind of seed will get you the best 
results? 

THINK IT OVER. 

We are now prepared to take your order for 
any variety of winter seed. 

Fancy New Timothy, Kentucky Blue Grass, 
Orchard Grass, Red Clover, Alsike Clover, 
Alfalfa, Yellow and White oweet [Clover, 
Fancy Recleaned Red Top. 

It is a fact that in previous years prices 
of seeds have always jumped as the seed 
season advances, so why not play wise — 



KENTOM 
COUNTS 



FARMS * 







W.T.L00MI5 



i in Kenton Go. Ky_ 
• daily roucti with 



MJi-UcNCYK' 



"The KTTCAm 





Generalship, I heard a chief of staff 
at the front once say, Is three -quarters 
a knowledge of the mood, the condi- 
tion and the chnructer of your men. 
For a week I traveled the British 
front with a grlzxled mnjor of a High- 
land regiment, who find been fn the 
game since 1014. We lunched one day 
with a mingled group of field and In- 
telligence officers, a Belgian on liaison 
work, and a visiting French captain. 
The talk, which was chiefly upon spe- 
cialties beyond the range of war, made 
one fact evident — the world of civilian 
life was more Interesting than ever 
before to these men. They were pns- 
•ioastety desirous to get back, to 
"clean up the mess" there, to go on 
with their broken career*. 

"How do you stay so keen on your 
Job here." I ttkgd the major, after- 
ward, "when you arc more weary of 
war I ban they are at home?" 

He Hushed a little. liilll.sli fashion. 
"Have |n clean tip thin mess, first," he 
RBS*i civil. 

A Week Inter one of the liiimt lOVB- 

hh- hoyj 1 haxe ever known (he was 

killed a *vt»i i. Ind i i i i by his Mru- 

puii on the 'American front, talking 

In lie ' I 1 ; 10 

I ilmi i ihlnl. mui h of the ihuit. 
he said, "though I don I rofffjl U. It's 

ail part of u per » Mwg- 

• I i: M)K A l H" MK I * 



A good deal of the trouble of this 
world arises from the fact that . some 
folks like to have gardens, while oth- 
ers prefer to keep hens.— Nixon Water- 
man. 

THREE MEALS A DAY. 

To plan meals three times a day for 
a family, trying to serve the food that 
is pleasing, keep- 
ing one's hills 
within (be limit 
and providing a 
variety, and hav- 
ing the dayjs food 
well balanced, is 
the task of 20.- 
000,00X1 cooks in 
this land of ours ; 
a task which takes reul training and 
practice to be successful. 

•Cream Peach Cake. — Bake a layer 
cake and for the filling add a cupful 
of very ripe peaches put through a 
ricer to sweeteued whipped cream t hut 
is flavored with almond. 

Coffee Junket. — For a dessert which 
Is wholesome nod ensy to prepare as 
well as dainty to serve, junket stands 
at the hend. Take one Junket tablet, 
crush and dissolve in a tahlespoonful 
of water, then add to a quart of luke- 
warm milk. Ueserve half a cupful of 
the milk and pour boiling hot over two 
tublespoonfuls of coffee, let stand until 
well infused, then strain and cool be- 
fore adding to the milk. If the milk Is 
heated" too hot the junket will not 
thicken the ftillk. Serve with whipped 
cream on the top of the glass. 

Lamb Cutlets. — Cook elulit lamb 
chops on one side until well browned; 
turn and on the cooked side place a 
tenspoonful of seasoned cooked maca- 
roni. Cover with buttered crumbs and 
let cook lti the oven about eight min- 
utes. Creamed peas served In a thick 
white sauce may be used instead of 
the macaroni, which will make a most 
tasty dish. 

Ice Cream In Case.-- -I'ake an angel 
cake In u round deep tin and »ln"i 
cold, ctrt out Hie center leaving a thick 
shell to hold vanilla ice cream arid 
servo at once. 

Cherry Ice Cream. ThH I* 
good to look at and better to eal 
a cupful "f rich pherrj [nice mid 
of n i.iiii n iiit a few dropd of » 
extract, Ha ■ leu to taste 
M usual. Si'; \ ii In ihcrbci 
garnish with i 
minced cbei leu tvlttl 

sirup. 

A w hipped 'ii im mill! 
cupful nt chnp|H d pi 

pic, m mio niitu 

SiM Ii' ill II 



both 

Im' 
I pint 

if .,!, m id 
nd i !>•' '<■ 
cups ami 
d of 
• 4 of (he 

iih i half 



Its A Wise 



Practical head which decides to give Husband 
or Father, Brother or Sweetheart "A Warm 
Friend That Will Stick" when the cold winds 
blow. What would be more appreciated as a 
CHRISTMAS GIFT than a 

Suit or Overcoat 

WACHS has them for 

Men, Young Men 
and Boys 

Also a large stock of Sweater Coats, Corduroy 
and Duck Coats ; also Pants. Let us show them 
to you 




Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 



lUxu«. 7VW»rt/at 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 

WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 
Consolidated Phone 39. Farmers Phone. 



Philip Taliaferro 

Undertaker 1 Embalmer 



Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 

ERLANGER, 



■■ 




KY. 



pk««- * D *r- Erl - 87 

Night: trl 52-Y 



I 



-< 



Read Our Advertisements and Profit ov l hem. 



H 






THURSDAY JAN. 16, 1920 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



BnnNE CO. RECORDER 

I'LliJ.MIKIi KVkliV Til IRS DAY v 

W. L. RIDOtXL. Publisher. 



■**"?'" led jil il. 
• i. Ky.. a; 



Pi h i « filet in Burling 
Second-class Mail 




I--. 



JOIN THE FARM BUREAU. 

Membership Drive January 26 

and 27— Meetings to Be 

Held at Various Points 

In The County. 



During next wcpk, beginning, 
Monday, 19th, a publicity cam- 
paign will be held in the county. 
Meetings will be held at various 
points in the county to acquaint 
the farmers in every section 
with the Farm Bureau' and the 
work it can do for the better- 
ment of agriculture in Boone conn 
ty. Local -leaders in all the com- 
munities will be assisted by 
Messrs. Geoffrey Morgan and Mor- 
gan Hughes, two of the ablest mi 1 
on the Agiicultural Extension 
force in the state. Yot mnst pirn 
to attend at least one of t h«^." 
meetings and get a definite under- 
standing as to wluit the Farm 
Bureau is. Be a booster fo r jOiir 
county. Meetings have W'?n _ ai*- 
ranged as follows: 

Burlington— Monday, 1 :00 p 
January 19th 

Hebron— Monday, 8:00 
January 19th. 

Florence— Tuesday . 7:30 
January 20th. 

Beaver Lick— Wednesday 
m., January 21st. 

Rabbit Hash— Thursday, 1:00 p. 
m , January 22nd. 

Petersburg— Thursday. 7 :30 p 
m., January 22nd. 

Walton— Friday, 7:30 p m.. Jan. 
23rd 

Organization on the part of the 
farmers will stabilize the business 
and assure cost of production. The 
farmer has the same right to re- I 
turns on capital invested as the ! 
bank or factory. This organization j 
needs you. 

By January 26th and 27th you \ 
will be asked to help with this 
great business. You will be giv- ; 
en an opportunity for the first j 
time to join hands with thefar-< 
mers of Kentucky and the other 
states in. perfecting an organiza- 
tion so strong that the farmer 
will receive justice. 

W. D. SUTTON, 
County Farm Agent. 



Kernels Culled From Events of 

Moment in All Parts of 

The State. 



Somerset— A movement has been 
started among business men to 
establish a $100,000 sanitarium for 
the treatment of cancer here. 



!' 



I> 



m 



m. 



m. 



FEED, SUNSHINE AND 
EXERCISE FOR 

THE YOUNGSTERS. 

Three essentials for success with 
young pigs are feed, sunshine and 
exercise. The fastest and cheap- 
est gains are made on a pig be- 
fore weaning time so it follows 
that it will pay to keep the 
small pig growing as rapidly ns 
possible. The sow should he fed 
to her full capacity on some good 
milk-producing feed as soon as 
the pigs are old enough to take 
all the milk she will give. It is 
poor economy to limit the feed 
at this time since pigs make the 
most economical gains from feed 
fed through the sow. When about 
a month old, the ,pigs will be 
able to use more feed than that 
obtained from the v sow, even 
though the snow has been prop- 
erly fed and is a good milker. 
The pigs will usually eat at the 
age of four or five months and 
as soon as they will eat, they 
should be fed separately from 
their dam. Make a creep so they 
may have access to a small pen 
Jackson - rhe Council publish- j wliere the ^v; cannot get their 
es warning that unless bells are , feed . A vrrv gooi feeU forthem 
taken off of cows at night they | is skim ^k it f a shaUow J)an . 
will be barred irom the streets j Teach the pigs to run into the 
aitjogetjier ■ creep for feed by allowing them 

„ , , . ~ . , . some shelled or ear corn. When 

Columbia -Dying f i om burns, ithev begin to eat well, make a 
Mrs. Ed. Shuffett, who had pour- 1 sloj) of milk> „,„,,, shorts, alli- 
ed kerosene over her clothing and j tle bran and som » Unseed oil meal 
applied the match, said the rea- , or tankage fed along with the 



Mt. Sterling— When a rooster, 
owned by Mrs- E. E. Jones, was 
called at feeding time it was 
found he was covering a ffock of 
English sparrows which had taken 
shelter from the cold. 

Frankfort. — A truck loaded 
with whisky enroute from Louis- 
ville to Cincinnati skidded on a 
river hill and overturned. Anoth- 
er truck was secured to compfetto 
the haul and none oi* the liquor 
was lost 



M p. 



son for her act was that she had 
sought religion but failed to find 

it ■» 

London— S. W. Asher was elect- 
ed chief of police at -WOO petr 
month, it being stipulated that he 
also shall assess the town, collect 
all taxes, supervise the repair 
of streets, enforce the curfew law 
and be subject to call by tele- 
phone 24 hours a day. 

Milton— Twelve thousand bar- 
rels of whisky remain in ware-r 



corn. This makes a ration which, 
with proper exercise, will not 
cause thumps or scours. 

Corn, four parts, shorts, four 
parts, bran, one part, and tankage 
one part, will bo found a good 
ration for young pigs. Make 
these proportions by weight. Corn 
in the ration may be gradually in- 
creased as the pigs grow older 
until the amount has been doub- 
led. 

Scours or thumps is perhaps the 

most common trouble caused by 

i improper feeding and care of 

houses oi the local distillery await vo pi d % uamUv cau9e o 

mg evaporation or other d.sposi-Jby changing the feed of "the sow, 



Public Sale! 

> 

I will sell at public auction at my residence, 
1 mile North of Bullittsville, Ky., on 

, January 24th, 1920 

A sale for the division of Stock and Crops of 

E. K. Stephens and James R. Byrne, 

The following property: 

Mules, Horses, Cows, Etc. 




2 aped Mules, 9-year old bay Mare, 7- 
year old Gelding, aged Mare, 8-year 
old black Horse, 4-year old Gelding, 2 
3-year old draft Mares, 9 Cows-'-two 



with Calves, 7 Springers, 2-year old 
Heifer— fresh in June, 23 Ewes, 9 
Yearlings, Registered Ram. 



Farm Implements, Etc. 



Pergonal Mention 



tion. 

Winchester— A campaign for *'50. 
000 with which to complete the 
new church and pay for a par- 
sonage will he conducted this 
week by the First M. E church. 

Pikeville — Bruce Little, Hayes 
Johnson and Milburn Little, charg 
ed with moonshining, were rescu- 
ed' from the jail at Wheelwright) 
by confederates, who sawed thr j 
bars from the outside 

Frankfort — Gov. Morrow has J 
given his indorsement to the pro- , 
posed bill providing for a system 
of state highways. 



Lexington— The local brewery is 



by over-feeding, by dirty pens or 
troughs, or by exposure of eith- 
er the sow or pigs or both to 
cold rain or cold weather. Just 
the use of a little common sense 
will prevent any one of these con 
ditions. Changing from sweet to 
sour milk or feeding too much 
high protein feeds, such as tank- 
age or linseed oil meal when the 
animals are not accustomed to it 
may also cause the trouble. Just 
another chance to use a little* 
common sense and prevent trou- 
ble. If the sow is fed too much 
her milk flow will be greatly stim 
ulated and the young jugs will 
ieceive more than they can util- 
ize, thus causing scours, all of 
which can be avoided by the use 
of Judgment or common sense 



Shovel Plow, Manure Spreader, 5- 
tooth Cultivator, 3 sets Double Har- 
ness, Scraper, Doubletrees, Singletrees, 
20 tons Hay, 8 Milk Cans, Milk Cooler 
and many other things too numerous 
to mention. 



McCormic Wheat Binder, Deenng 
Mowing Machine, McCormic Hay- 
rake, Hay Loader, 2-horse Sled, Hay 
Bed, 2 Riding Cultivators, Acme Har- 
row, Big Tooth Harrow, 3 Breaking 
Plow Pointers, 2 Singe and 1 Double 



Miss Elizabeth Kelly has gone 
to Georgetown to attend college considering *75,ooo ijnprovenaeate j £, dT<rt*ex'e*ctBC and suna_fner t«H 
Miss Maude Hume of Covin*- ' ? * W - le ,fc r° manu- :gether with excess feeding. is 

ton/ was the gJeTof ne/mofc \ £ c SiSn to" proWbftion^e? 10 j *»* 4 ° c ause f ^, ?ut down 
last Saturday night and Sunday ! aaamon tojn-omoition oeer. the mother , s fced and forc0 the 

«' j „ „ . ~ . .. i t „ •-..•il n i> nrti! -j _.rPigs to exercise in the sunshine. 

Mr and Mrs Frank Davrain vile,; Louisville-H R. Whiteside sued I w f th little experience, it will 
of Newport, spent Sunday with i the Artie Cold Storage Company ; ^ fd u t as ^ asv t o suddIv 
hto hrotKer, W R. Davrain vide «I Jefferson ville for 15000 a.leg- ^^ght & "ind^tlS SgS. 
and family I jng potatoes stored at it* plant quanti ties of feed as it is to 

Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Redinger, of j s P rolKe ' J - g«t them out in the sunshine and 

_\K£_3 S?"* i KTS^TSftS'hKirh & 

its bar was closed^ July 1. development of the pig. 

1 Richmond — Harvey Gibson, oil) — __s — 

I stock salesman, was released from 

i jail, after a- month upon pay- 
ment of worthless checks and a 
fine for defrauding the focal hf>- 
tpl 



TERMS OF SALE. 

Six months time will be given without in- 
terest; 3 per oent. discount for cash. 

E. K. Stephens. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock. J. M. EDDINS, Auctioneer. 



of the winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Furnish Penn, of 
Covington, spent Saturday night 
and Sunday with his parents, Mr. 
Mrs. Geo. Pen/i. 

Mrs. C. C. Roberts and daugh- 
ters, Miss Sheba and Mrs, Martin 
were #|uite ill several days the 
past week of colds. 

C. Scott Chambers, a Walton un- 
dertaker, was in Burlington, last 
Sunday, and left quite a number 
of his calendars as evidence of 
his visit. 

Chas Miller and mother, of Big 
Bone, were guests of Mrs. MiU^r'-i 
sister, Mrs. 11. B. Uume. fast Sun- 
day. Mrs. Miller remained for a 
visit of several days. 

Manley Gulloy, who is !n the 
government service at Camp Reed. 
Washington, D. C„ arrived at home 
last Sunday on a fifteen days fur- 
lough. Mr. GulK-y is connected 
with the medical corps and ex- 
pects to be discharged In av 
month or so. 

(.'. W. Goodiklge and wife arriv- 
ed from Lebanon Last Monday 
evening, the office o,' County 
Road Engineer which Mr. Goocl- 
ridge had been tilling in Marion 
county having been abolished by I 
the Fiscal Court at a recent term. 
Mr. Goodridge has an option on | 
the like office in two . or three i 
other counties in the State. 



Germany's Economic Situation. 



Louisville — Mayor Smith flatly 
refused the petition of the Min- 
isterial Association that the so- 



While laborers of this country 
are enjoying numerous vacations 
the workers of Germany are bond- 
ing their energies toward the hope 
of Germany's commercial leader- 
ship. Speaking in Berlin Herr 



called "Blue law''' be invoked to l S chmid V Minister of _ Food ana 

close moving picture theaters on 

Sunday. 



Paris— The 303-acre farm of Ef- 
mer Myers, killed in a recent au- 
tomobile accident, was sold by 



his widow to Johns & Switzer, of reached 
Cynthiana, for ¥90,000 



Economics, says that 'the econom- 
ic situation in Germany had recent 
ly improved to an astonishing ex- 
tent. »' He cited statistics to show 
that production in the mines, ship 
yards and general industries had 
a level approaching the 



PUBLIC SALE. 



Having sold my farm, I will offer for sale at 

my residence on the East Bend road, four 

miles from Burlington, Ky., on 



Wednesday, Mirj Wk 1920 



Grayson — Charles Johnson an i 
Wm. Sparks, Elliott county, ar- 
rested at Hitchins with three suit 
cases containing i. ,^„.Ls of wins 
ky, were b. ought to jail here. 

Georgetown — Revmond HsWson 
bought 12 acres of land near Del 
phaine from (' V Davenport 
$1050 per acre 



pre-war basis Some exceptions 
were noted ,but these were attrib- 
uted to a lack of raw material. 

The military defeat of Germany 
in the eyes of most people, remov- 
ed Germany from the forefront of 
industrial competition This same 
defeat, with its revealing helpful- 
ness has impressed all Germany 
with the need of immediate work. 
,t Germany it appears has gone to 
work not because her laborers arc 
less inclined to strike, but because 



The Following Personal Property l 



Frankfort— The adjutant gener- her laborers arc less inclined to 
at will propose to the General As- strike, but because her gloomy 
scmbly that medals be struck for outlook held no prospect of gain, 
all Kentuckians who ser\i>d in the and even small hope of existence, 
world war. unless production began at once. 

I Consequently her laborers went to 

Catlettsburg-Mi-s Famone Ro**-j-3B>rk. In other countries, without 
Miss Ress Hall, of Newport, and I seau, 21, who came from Paris, I th '» compelling necessity, the la- 
William Kyle, of Los Angel «, (al- Prance, was married here to Jeste borers stop to dream and strike 
ifornia, were guests of M and P. Brown, 40, who met her while i to giin. By so doing they are 
Mrs. F. A. Hall, last Saturday, overseas. I helping German industry to reoon- 

Mr. Ryle was on his way home , quer the world. If American la- 



Mrs. Hal Pressor, of JLatonia 



from New York where ho had rep 
resented his firm at 
vention of dictaphone people Mr 
Ryle is a son of the late O •/ 
Ryle and Is a fine looking. 
sprightly young genllunvvn P" 
says California is the onl; place 
to live. 



Cynthiana— The fiscal court ap- bor 



and capital continue their 
antagonism long enough 



large- eon- preprinted :jil00> wi.h which to es- i present 

tablish quarter* for the local post the trade prospect of their coun- 



<if the American Legion 

•■ Let us forget that a man may 
l>e 'dry' without being a prohibit 
tionist.— New York TeK'graph 



Recalls Coin Harvey. 



Isn't 



I'eace 
worse than wa 
so because it's here now 
State Journal. 



K (1 Cox, one of tln> Inistling 
farmer and truck growers In Pet- 
ersburg precinct, was a bunines^ 

Harvey's visitor t<» Hu.Hiigi'iii, TucmIiv Mr 
Con si>.-> there will be a strong 
protest (Ued before the county 

jlillgr On the pliv of the |i droll's 

oi the Aurora ferry in npposiUo.i 



to tin 1 proposition of 



i>\\ ner hi 

in nr \ f si 

LewU P 

■ n in. i In 



in- 



Back in 18% Coin Harvc y knew 
more alxiut money than all the 
bankers and financiers in the 
United States put togeth i in 
those memorable day* ther; 1 were 
corner store foafers In every \i 
lage who, with Coin 
help, could tie the town bank- 
ef'Up into such a knotty' ,ai 
ment about gold and silver in 
five minutes that he wouldn't in- 
tricate himself in a week Mon- 
keying with currency theories has 
always been a fid an I so in we 
can rememlier thera nevei waa i 
solution that r«»iildiit 1m prove i 
absolutely sound and works i 
by the discoverer The propuaa^ ht-ei 
.»f an Bnfliah Mnanckar that th 
allied nations iesue universal rur- pNMW mon 
reni-v t<> hold an taitemutfo.il iiart) In 

nudliy list at a ct»n«tunt level hail sold to 
and aUbiUae o^cueufe atmndu Mi Sulli\ u 
lu» the firal fun la the wnrnt* Mr wim,. i, 
earresnr Hehete in aU htator y 



probably 

r, but only seems 



really 
eexOM 
Ohio 



Ihi 



the |i|'ipi ity 

• rati <>r ferriage 

uilt\ in. u ho 



•l i,i, 

Ihiiiii'- 

lioughl 



ill's ( 
ferry 



n » liuj :. nan, |, i 

til III hi' S.,1,1 || | r 

111) n M SiiHi\ . 

lloP V\ I,, ,., ,,| „||,,,„ 

u 



try will fade away, and a glorious 
opportunity will be squandered.-- 
Vanceburg Sun. 

Hauling Boose in Hearses. 

Wednesday morning two drib 
colored hears°s and a large auto 
said to be from Pi|ua, O., and 
Headed from Ashlaml, Ky., passed 
thiu town. Now this was a some 
what roundabout way to get from 
that plnee to Ashland, crossing 
the river threo times Many folks 
had a well defined idea that the 
double- funeral wa* that of John 
Bareiyroni and his si le partaer 
Jimm\ bier. When they • rossed 
the river hire on ' li" ferry tlho 
COrpaea Wet* so heavy thai a team 

had to be secured to pull the 
hearses up the bill 

\\Y were Informed thai the bear 
set ciiiit lined mii'iil bo\e» Instead 

nf the i iistiiinii v cifllnt, so we 
ii >■ led t*. I. '|i, s ■ I li it ! In- ho Hen 
had bee n "id up and no dmiM 
Imbalmed In b ftw s e lo keep them 
from mortifying Thla Id • « ol 
transportiiig h, ><</,• in the guise 

literal h i* Itemtme 
.nut in some pi i i" i tli lute* 

t. i p i w ii l> i>v the 

in* Van eburg Hun 



7 year old bay Horse— weight 1,200 
pounds, 8 Shorthorn Cows to be fresh 
in Janury and March, 5 wealing 
Calves, 22 good Hampshire Stock 
Ewes to lamb about March 20th, 
Mowing Machine, 2-horse Cultivator, 
Wheat Drill, Riding Cultivator, Disc 
Harrow, Hinge Harrow, Jumping 
Shovel Plow, u Double Shovel Plow, 
Dixie Plow, pair Check-lines, Bridles, 
Collars, set Buggy Harness, Buggy 



Pole, Singletrees, Pitch-forks, Breast- 
yokes, Doubletrees, Platform Scales, 
Lard Kettle, Lard Press, 16-foot Lad- 
der, 50-gallon Coal Oil Tank, Grind- 
stone, Sickle Grinder, 8-gallon Milk 
Can, 2 / -horse Sled, 12-foot Gate, new 
Dehorner, Walking Cultivator, Hay- 
rake, new Hay Bed, set Pulleys and 
100 feet new Rope, and many other 
articles too numerous to mention. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

On sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a 
credit of 9 months without interest, purchasers to give notes 
with approved security, negotiable and payable in Peoples 
Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky., before removing property. 

J* D. Acra. 

Sale to begin at 9 a. m sharp. 



Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. 
LUNCH FREE. 



Bernard Sebree, of Plattsburg, A. B. Ingrain, of Marshall, Saline 
was a caller at this office, last county, 

Monday Mr Sebree has a crop friends and relatives in Burling- 
of about three thousand pounds ton, last Monday. Mr. Ingram 
of very fine tobacco* which he ; had come to Cincinnati on busi- 
sold to "Pepper'' Smith, of Bel- nose for his firm,' and could not 
leview, at 60 cents a pound, from miss the opportunity to take a 
Khe ground up He saya he would awing around through tWs part 
have liked to put it over* the. 'of Boone county to meet his rot- 



county, Missouri, was calling on | auction, a Texas 8teer«e horn was 

" /that was p 
his father, James A. Riddcll, many 



loose leaf floor, but 1h very well 
Hatinfied with the price he go* 



atives and old friends. He left 
for his western home Monday 
night. ______ 

It seem, that t he to wn of Ve- , ^ - 

further day night remained until Monday 
iiiuirnoon, when it began diaap J 



At Marco Riddell's closing out 

*s horn was 
discovered /that was presented to 



years ago by Cant, 
bell, of Cincinnati, 



rona will not 

off the. map without a 

a?_jwTO_5rttfct sr_r _r°7r_s "-sss 1 ^ *=» 

„r_ tor" .ir,U" suStt JE£s .«* 



i"Z 



tu cui» MUt'l iHi.iidllng 1 
incorporation, and 



tOH ll'S 

having the record prepared 
that purpoae 



lor 



irday and 

i bedeekad 

YiidajTi Saturday amd Bon- 



Hoi 



MUton Camp- 
of Cincinnati, while he was 
t member of a company pf the 
Cincinnati Fire Department. If the. 
old horn could talk it could tell 
of many an exciting fox chase 
which its owner had carried it 
through as far back as 40 yearn 
sgo. Many a hound has the old 
'tooter 1 ' summoned to the ehuae 



ity Clerk Rogers and hit de 

try buaj 

up the recapltuiat^ou 



hU slater, lfiaa Llaale. 
very busy fon sever a I days 
tl 



jmiy, 

bean 

making 

•beat from the Tan 



•rHl book. 

an g^aai^r in saa j 



Oommlsaloo- 

t »tal amount 

r has liMiraaav- 

pa-t taw jwara 



h\ 



Jl*- 



w^ssasssspesssesjni ■ - 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY JAN. 16, 1920 



< 



■■■■■■■•>■■■■■■■■■■■*■■■■■■■■■■■'■■■—■■■'■■■" ■- I 

SPECIALr-MerT^ Heavy Jersey 

Gloves made with knit wristlets— this is just what every 

one needs now— a good pair of warm gloves at a low 

price. |Qfi 

Special per pair ■ * v 

Wc can save you money on Peace Goods of all kinds, such as 
Muslins, Ginghams, Percales, etc. Get our prices before buy- 
ing— ITPATS^______ 

Here is a, big special"— Heavy, Unbleached Muslin, one yard 
wide, worth at today's market at about 32 cents 9R 1 P 

Special at per yard st U 2 V 

Here is another— standard Apron Gingham in small blue, 
black and brown checks. Other stores are asking 30c OCp 
Our price per yard LUv 

Best grades of Cheviot Shirting, in dark or light patterns of 
all kinds— these are high grade Shirtings '*r Q^p 
Special at per yard M^U 



BOONE COUNTY PEOPLE 

know that our prices on high grade merchan- 
dise are much lower than those of city stores 
— besides there is some satisfaction in know- 
ing also that the Quality is right — there are 
many of our customers who have been 
buying here for the past seven years. 

Compare Our Prices With Those of Other Stores. 



SPECIAL— Men's and Ladies' Cot- 

. ton Hose, Men's in black, blue and gray ; Ladies' are in 
black only. These are unusual big values and they .vili 
not be here long at this price. I Qr 



Special pair 



Men's heavy fleece lined or ribbed Shirts or Drawers 
i Special 



rlFsc 



98c 



Men's heavy cotton work Socks with double toe and heel 
Special '. 



23c 




Men's Corduroy Pants, welfmade, -guaranted not to 
rip. Special 



$4.90 



Men's high-grade Corduroy Coats, made with warm blanket 
lining-, large collar, well made, $S 00 value fjp flO 

Special $D.UU 

Boys' serviceable Kee Pants, very neat looking pat- 
j terns. Just in. See them at 



Erlanger, Ky 



We are daily receiving new merchandise. 



$1.98 



\ 



HEBRON 



Goode &Dunkie 

are doing more business than any other house in Northern Kcncucky. 
WHY? Ask any of our customers about our Prices, Treatment, 
and Quality of goods. 

Mr. Farmer— 

Almost every day we get favorable reports on seeds we have 
sold. We do not handle low grade, trashy seeds. We know seeds 
and we know where to buy and we give you the benefit of our 
knoweledge and experience, When you order from us you can de- 
pend on High Test, Purity and Germination. 

Send us your inquiries for prices and samples of CLOVER, AL- 
FALFA, ALSIKE, TIMOTHY, BLUE GRASS, ORCHARD 
GRASS, Etc. 

WE BUY RIGHT AND WE SELL RIGHT. 



The heavy sleet put the tele- 
phono lines in very bad condi- 
tion. 

James Beall, of HamiKon, Ohio, 
has been visiting relatives here 

Miss Mary Eggleston was the 
week-end guest of Miss Lydia Ay-! 
lor. 

The Young Peopfes' Missionary j 
Society will meet with Miss Mary 
Conner Saturday afternoo.i. 

Mr. and Mrs. William E'iglan'1 
entertained somi' or their friends i 
with a social Saturday night. 

Mi. and Mrs William U.oo-'-i«»'ge. 
Jr., . entertained several of their i 
friends at Jinner, last Sunday 




STOP - 



. 0. 0. F. 




' At Hebron Hall, 



DEVON 



Send us your orders for Granula- 
ted Sugar. We will try to fill 
them. 



Blatchf ord's Calf Meal, cwt. $9.90 
Conceded to be the best on the 
market. 



¥ #)£)£lfrantflunKi& 



3L, ^GROCERIES. FLOUR SEEDS.MEDICfNES. 
m 8Jr« - 21 P/KE ST. /& -20 W. 7 1* ST. -. 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 335 and 336. 
United States Wheat Director License No. 0300S7-Y. 

U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



James W. Bristow was th^t guest 
of friends in the city Sunday. 

Charles Schadler, wife and lit- 
tle son, were gue-st3 of their par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Schadler, 
Sunday and Monday. 

Mrs. Charles Tyrees guest from 
Richmond, Ky., returned home 
last Wednesday after spending a 
fortnight with Mrs. Tyree. 

Many in this neighborhood are 
suffering irorn bad colJs. We are 
glad to report Mrs. C. E. Rector 
improving from a very severe 
cold. 

Little Stella Elizabeth Miller re- 
turned home Wednesday after a 
"pleasant visit to "her grandmoth- 
er, Mrs H. E. MOller, of. Big 
Bone. 

W. W. Woodward is home after 
a pleasant trip to his father, 
James Woodward, of Texas. Will ! 
says old Kentucky is good enough 
for him. We see .Where you are 
right, Will. 

Geo. Jones, who has b?en spend 
ing the holidays with friends in 



o 
o 



Friday, January 23, 1920 

GOOD MUSIC 

Coronet, Violin, Claronet, Traps 
Saxapbone. 



8 



Come One, Come All, Young and Old. 

Waltz, Two-Step, Quadrille 

will be the go. 



I 



Zimmer 



COMMITTEE 

Brown 



Wingate | 



GUNPOWDER 






GAMBLE WITH RUIN. 



Documents made public by the 



last Saturday and remained with 
friends here until Sunday even- 
ing. 



»**************eeee*****e« Department of Justice, prove that 
***** , .. . . . . one of the objectives of the rev- 

' Cam Ken^vViast Sund." ^ .±£3*$ has been, to obtaih 
Kentucky will leave for the tat ^M^S^Utz hi* ?Z?5phooe Sfof Labor* ABmCM ^^ 
this week. He came out to Devon, d abou( . 6Q recordg for J e _ tion of Labor. - 

_ , .. !*«„* Samuel Crompers is quoted as 

B. A. Rouse and family wsited -ay^g « wc mu5t have rights be- 

hia parents, Mr- and Mrs. J. W. yond those of other men If wo 

Rouse, last Sunday. . . ... ; do not, what is to become of the 

*♦♦♦♦♦«*♦«♦»♦«♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦« j Ed. Slayback and R. E. Tanner Labor movement?'' 
« ♦ J were transacting business in the: u is a po puIar pas tj me io 

• UNION. * city on Tuesday of last week. [paint Gompers and his following 

We are under obligations to as great conservatives, and to ox- 
some unknown friend who mailed j cuse the placing in their hands 
a very useful article tojthis writ- of extraordinary power by aver- 
ring that so only can the triumph 
of radicalism be averted. 



Raymond Newman spent Sunday 
with his uncle, Edward Newman 
and wife. 



No Place Like Home, r 



I have a much larger stock of 

Hardware, Dry Goods, No- 
tions and Groceries 
for 1920 

Than I have ever carried before. 

International Trucks, International Tractors, 
International Road Wagons, 

International Manure) Spreaders, 

International Primrose Separators- 

A Complete Jine of all kinds of farm fencing. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 

♦ 
BIG BONE CHURCH News ♦ 

♦ ! 



er a few days since. We appre- 
ciate the favor and would be glad 
Courtney Pope has purchased I to know who the sender is. 
property and will soon become a Dogs made a raid on Noah Zim 
citizen of our burg. merman's flock of sheep a few 

Mr. and Mrs. Nick Briggs, of days since, but, .fortunately, he 
Landing, spent Saturday jiigni ana '■ discovered them before they did 

Sunday at Robert Newman's. ! much damage. They wounded one cration of Labor has passed into 

Mrs. Chas. Hedges entertained j so badly it died the next day. j the control of the revolutionists? 
I ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»*♦♦ j at dinner, Sunday, Mis* Eugenia During the month of February) Already the great union ol*- 
It gives us Jov to note the good I Riley, Harry Riley and Miss there wul be no preaching services garehy has announced that every 
Itidings that our betoved Brother, | Louise Feldhaus. | j n the Boone County Charge as, union member must be fegallyr 

I Jim Taylor, is improving in health J Ryland Hedges and wife have; the Pastor, Rev Royer, has been j immune from deportation. What 
!He has long been one of the faith- returned from Sale Creek, Tenn , i granted a vacation during that i if all the revolutionists becomq 
,ful stand-bys of this church and where they went to attend the j month Rev. Royer has worked union members and ar? authorlt- 
lall love to do him reverence. Sis- funeral of their brother-in-law, M. I very faithfully since he took . ed by law to do what they pleas© 
ters Q. L. Smith and Fannie Sui- C. Weaver. [charge of this pastorate and well | without molestation! 

deserves a vacation for recreation, j No wonder the Re( j 8 aec {q the 

At the annual business meeting , Federation of Labor the medium 



But what will happen to the 
country if it wakes up some 
nornign to find that it has con- 
ferred! a great immunity on the 
Federation of Labor and the Fed 



I livan are improving too. 
j are being cared for by 
i and attentive hands and 



Both) 
loving I 



Robert Conner and Miss Lottie 
Riddell were quietly married at 



these L a tonia last Saturday After Jan ! at Hopeful church on Tuesday of i through which to overflow the 
with the skillful services of Dr. j 2 oth they will be at home to ! last week the following officers Government. Its triumphs In the 



Ryle ami .the blessings of God, • thcir many f r j end3 at the country 

we trust, will bring about a re- reBi dence of W. W. Conner. ' 

storation to health and strength. „,. m „_„ f..s^,^„ ~t hi —.nr. retary ; W 

Our people here are much slat- L£ h * ™* ny . f ",f nd V f M , r £° Sry; L 
tered, roads are bad and weather £ ^k 8 "^ '? £m °k™' 
conditions hindering. So, we will i ^ th p 1 2S ch q ,^ curi " 1 ed at , h, , l,nom * 
decide to omit our Sunday even- ; ^ Creek. Tenn., Jan Jed. He 

had been in poor health since the 



»ng 
Then, 



** A nice line of harness, such as Bridles, Collars, Back Bands 



D 



1 



Check lines, and complete sett of harness. 

Feed, Flour, Salt, Etc. 

Some pretty patterns of Ginghams and Calicoes 
toselect from. 



o 

D 



I think I will be able in a short while, when you come into 

my store and ask for an article, I can tell you that I 

have it for you at a price that you will be satisfied. 

If you have any country lard to sell, I want it, and will 
pay, you a fancy price. Bring your eggs and poul- 
try to me for I have always led in prices. 

t"\Y BY YOUR HOME DEALER 
AND HE WILL STAY WITH YOU. 
t L. KIRKPATRICK, 
Burlington, Ky. 



Sunday 
services for several weeks, 
when spring comes, we 
hope to have an enthusiastic "ral- 
ly day' and all fall in line again 
for a better Sunday school, rich- 
er and more spiritually helpful 
church services and the speedy 
completion of our Sunday school 
annex. 

An efficient committee* -J. T. 
Edwards, J. W. Aylor and Robert 
W. Allen has In charge the build- 
ing v..->the Sunday school annex. 
The foundation is laid and ma- 
terial contracted for. It is hoped 
that all our people will heartily 
co-operate, contribute as gener- 
ously as is possible and pay their 
subscriptions as the committee 
requests. 

New Year greetings and best 
wishes to th«« editor and to all 
the readers of the Recorder. 

O. C, P. 



♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

• 9 

• FRANCBSVILLB. • 

e e 

••— •• - --«•--*♦•••••»*•••♦» 

MLbh Kntnia Uoodddge fell on the 
lew and broke her arm, ono day 
Ust week 

Mta* Lydh \\i>><, of Hebron, was 
the (/ui-hI <>t Mia* M try Kgglestou 
U»t Hat unt iv 

MutfMMt AUcv> UhmU 'i"i> wild Mcrr*- 
tie Blsackar spent »n • night luet 
week with Mi»< Ihi ogdiMi 



death of his oldest daughter some 
fifteen months ago. Mr. Weaver 
waa a native of this county, hav- 
ing been born and reared near 
Union. He la survived by a wife, 
formerly Miss Alice Bannister, and 
two children. He was 66 years and 
eight months old. The family have 
the deepest sympathy of this 
unity. 



were elected : M. P. Barlow, Chair j field of special legislation cause 

man ; B. A. Floyd, Recording Sec- no crying of the Bolsheviki. They 

"'. P. I'tz, Finance Secre- _ see being built up a vast and in- 

T. Utz, S. S. Superin- , vincible inner Oorernmaut, and 

tendent ; J. S. Surface, Elder ; E. : they rejoice because thev appre- 

A. Blankenbeker, Deacon; N. A. j ciate that all they have" to do 

Zimmerman, Trustee; B. A. Floyd, • later is to seize that inner Gov- / 

Miss Rosa Barfow, Or- ornment and 



commi 



FLORENCE. 



•ei 

brtworn Km 
Witr* f«>uii<l 

.lug 



.1.. 



I. int 



Fil>U\ 



Clyde Anderson and wife ana 
Miss Bessie Craven were Sunday 
guests of MIsa Pearl Loud. 

Robert Pearson was the guest 
of his mother last Sunday. 

Sam Hambrick is ill of pneu- 
monia at his home on Price pike 

Mr. and Mrs. L E. Thompson 
entertained Rev. DcMosa fast Sun 
day. 

Mrs. i esslc Cook sjM'nt last Fri- 
day with her parents, Wr and 
Mrs John R. whitMin 

Robert Conner, of Erlanger. uiut 
Miss Lottio Riddell. of Florence, 
were married at llro Kunyun'H, 
in Latouia, laat Sunday afternoon 
Will MarksU'i-ry and Mis Bessie 
HlddeU werv th»» sttendan4s 

Mr and Mn Kd H.vdmiv «nU-r 
taiiMHl Huntlay at diiuo > Mi aJid 
Mrs Justin Llllard. «»i South- 
faiei Mr simI Mrs Uojrd Ajrknr 
nod ehlMi,ii. Mr« Kaiudo ilutter- 
buek. sfrs J II "«u' k 



Choirister . 

ganist E. K. Tanner was award 
ed the office of sexton for the 
ensuing year. 

Press Gossip. 

Possibly the census takers' Job 
would he simplified if they would 
first tabulate the presidential pos 
sibilities and then count what 
few of us remain.— Chicago News. 

If Bryan should run again it 
would remind old-timers of a cer 
tain "race horse'' never known to 
win a purse but eternally enter- 
ed by his owners.— Knoxville Jour 
nat and Tribune 

Possibly Governor Allen, of Kan 
sns, waved away the Presidency 
because he doubted whether Wm 
Allen White could deliver it. -Hits 
burg Dispatch. 

rh iii man Cummin's position is 
thai Democrats musit ''point with 
pride'' to whatever the Presidenl 

has done lndi:uiapoli» Star. 

Most of the consternation over 
a possible candidacy for Me. Bryan 
-ems to be lit tlu. Democratic 
Doiroit Ni-«» 

the i'onimuulst l.n>H>r party 

would be iiHiiw MtltJeetees it it 

would euuuuuivn Us* ami labor 
more Kansas City Star. 

One bilght phase of the aittttr- 
tion, however, U that Ki 
PsaretMl Hobsoo Uu't IsUiok 

t» lt,HX»ld 



the legal Qovern- 
ment will be theirs. 

The very fact that the incen- 
diaries seek control of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor proves 
that to ' clothe the Federation 
with special and extraordinary 
powera is to gamble with ruin.— . 
Manufacturers' Record. 



ill 



♦ *» 

♦ ORANQE HALL. e 

♦ e 
♦eeseseeseeeseseeeee* 

James Stephens is seriously 
of pneumonia 

Mrs. Ezra Blankenbeker has been 
very ill for several days. 

Several in this vicinity filled 
their ice houses the past week. 

Neil Clements spent Saturday 
night with his sister. Mr. lluey* 
Ryle 

Mjhs Jessie Utz SpCOl last week 
as the guest of Hiss U.na HUllk- 
enbeker. 

Hev Peyton snd alls made sev- 
eral pastoral cull ui tlu» n«fighf> 
borhood hfondaj 

Mrs liars i \ Menour snd Mr*. 
Owen Presevr o m it .t in-uday 
with ftlts L •*» idei U off 

t'ljile Clem •nn in I » IHj 

Bone, \tmtid bin ftandpaiesjll la 

tins neighborhood I »st w«ei 
\v i wife 

1 mute * Hitnit<4' I t»t 

. . ,1 .UlUlSi A# ft 

tkflta 



M 1(1, 
litUdo 

tugk > 



Mi 






Mi 



THURSDAY JAN. 16, lfWO 



booNE COUNTY SECOJtDBR 



LACK OF HORSES 
IS MOST SERIOUS 



PRODUCTION OF THOROUGH. 

BRED!? MUST BE EN- 

COURAGED. 



PRESENT SUPPLY IS SHORT 



Army Would Need One Animal for 

Every Two Men Should We Be 

Called Upon to Engage in 

Military Operation for 

Any Reason. 



Some hlea of the magnitude of the 
task of the Kcmmint Board of the 
United States urfiiy in organizing auo 
amintalninjP a horse breeding ami 
tuippl.v Mlieinc for the future forces 
of national defense may De had by a 
study of the reports of the reuioun; 
ulliicrs of the A. K. 1'.. for llie period 
of 101T-1918. It wa> found in France 
that the old theory that the prop- 
osition oi* horse strength to man 
Strength in armies should he two to 
Ave was erroneous. One liorse for 
every two men was ncedei 
astoiiUIiine nt the officers 
uiotmt service, many of 
never isci^i^tlie inside of 
text 



To their 
of t lit' re- 
whom had 

a military 
before 



ho4£Whiril a few wei 
they received their commissions, dis- 
covered that six hundred horses wcrs 
required to equip a single infantry 
regiment of war strength! that is a 
regiment of ;ukk) to ::.stio men. 

It was next to impossible to obtain 
horses in sutfioient numbers to 
properly equip even the artillery, 
transport and nnibulunce services of 
.-the A. K. 1'., lu'cause for a period of 
two years before the participation of 
the United biates in the eonllic-t 'the 
entente allies bad been draining the 
country of horses of all sorts and 
kinds, The A. E. F. had no cavalry. 

Modern Armies Are Large. 

Nowadays armies- are reckoned by 
hundreds of thousands, if not by 
millions. The strength of a single 
division of the A. E. F., was greater 
In men and horses than the biggest 
army commanded by Stonewall Jack- 
son in his entire career. The com- 
bined armies of Lee and Mende that 
took part in tlte struggle of (Jettys- 
■burg could have done no more in tas 
titanic conflict that terminated last 
November than hold two-score of 
miles of the western front. If the 
United States were called to arms, 
whether to defend some interest 
peculiarly our own or to fulfill i 
League of Nations obligating, the 
mobilization of from 500,000 to 1,000,- 
OOt) soldiers might be necessary. If 
[the old theory that the correct pro- 
portion of horse strength to man 
strength in armies was still accepted 
<by military opinion, 200,000 horses 
iwould be required for the outfitting of 
half a million soldiers, 400,000 for the 
outfitting of a force of 1,000,000 and, 
if an army of half a million or u 
million soldiers had to be kept in the 
field Jjj a state of military efficiency 
u reserve of 400,000 to 800,000 would 
be necessary. If the future military 
forces of the United States are to be 
outfitted with horses on a one to two 
basis with adequate reserves, and 
such a scheme of outfitting would be 
■necessary If the armies of the United 
States were to attempt Intervention 
In Mexico to protect American or 
European Interests In the maintenance 
of the Monroe Doctrine, it will bo 
necessary to provide an immediate 
mobilization force of from 250*000 to 
500,000 with reserves equally strong. 

Today tlte United States could no. 
-^properly outfit with horses an arm: 
iof 100,000 soldiers. There are horse 
,io the country, many of them. Bu: 
they are mostly draught horses — Xoi 
mans, Percherons, Clydesdales, IJel- 
ginns, Shires, etc. — whose military use- 
fulness Is limited to the dragging of 
heavy artillery. Horses of these 
!types are not in the least serviceable' 
to a mobile army, or an army of 
maneuver, ns the new phrase de- 
scribes an army that must perform 
'marches of fifteen lo twenty miles a 
dny or retreat quickly if strategy sug 
gests retreat. They are too sluggish, 
too lacking in spirit. The horses that 
are wanted are the light types and of 
these (here are so few the aggregsl 
;may properly be said to be a 
negligible quantity In any practical 
scheme of nationul defense. The gaso 
line motor long s'.neo made the pro 
ductlon of this type of horse un- 
profitable. Farmers and .stockmen 
have ceased to raise light bursa in 
ewwMernblc r/r/rtibers. The creation of 
a new supply musi be Stimulated bj 
the United States government, but 
nothing the govern niehi could do 
would suffice If there was any inter- 
ference with the production oi 
Ithoroughbrod stallions. Stallions ,,* 

the t horoughbr e d types are Indtspen* 

■Ible because (he offspring of »UC0 
stnlllons, whether from uiarea oj 
thoroughbred blood or from nunc 
no particular b r oo d i ng, p rove d I 
In a half century of experimental 
conducted In Europe by ihc 
military powers before the ou 
of the war of nations und the 
and three-quarter bred outstayed 
outgamed the repreeentstlvos of 



studied the problem or military bevse 
supply most deeply have declared 111 
recommendations to the general sttfft 
at Washington and to congress that 
the government must obtain and 
place at the disposal of farmers In 
sect ions of the country in which horses 
may he raised most economically be- 
tween KMMl and S000 thoroughbred 
stallions. A beginning has been made 
In this tremendous work, but no mor« 
than a beginning. The remount 
service has placed In Virginia, New 
York, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Texas ana 
in the far west some seventy-five or 
eighty thoroughbred stallions, and 
these stallions have, almost without 
exception, been the cheerful gifts of 
thoroughbred producers and persons 
interested in racing. 

It is because of the government's 
Insurmountable tuvl of thoroughbreu 
blood that the most distinguished 
officers of the regular military servic 
have been so outspoken in their 
opposition to half baked legislation 
that might interfere with thorough- 
bred production. MajiH'-Ooneral 
Leonard Wood was the first ollicer of 
high rank to declare himself publicly 
on this subject. In 1011 when 
thoroughbred stallions and mares by 
the hundreds were being shipped OUt 
of the country because the shutting 
down of racing in New York state Ui 
consequences of the Hughes anti-rac- 
ing legislation of T.V.IS and 1010 
dosed tlu> metropolitan market to 
thoroughbred producers. General Wood 
announced in the daily press that the 
loss of thoroughbred blood had as- 
sumed the proportions of a national 
calamity, and that if something were 
not done by the government to cfteck 
the exportation of such stock and to 
revive production it would be ini- 
posible to properly outfit with horses 
an army of the size the United States 
would have to put in the Held if w* 
came iu conflict with a first-class 
power. The prophesy of General 
Wood was to be abundantly fulfilled 
In 1017 and 1918 as had already been 
pointed out. 

Oppose Anti-Racing Laws. • 
When the hearings on the anti-rac- 
ing bills in Maryland's legislature 
were held a year ago last winter 
were on Gerund Andrew Hero, .com- 
mander of the Artillery Brigade of 
the Division of draught troops that 
was training at Camp .Meade, and 
Colonel Raymond Brlggs, of the Stttn 
field artillery, who afterwards be- 
came brigadier-general because of his 
distinguished service in the field, 
appeared before the judicial proceed- 
ings committee of tin; senate and pro- 
tested against legislative inter- 
ference with thoroughbred production. 
Major-General Kuhn and Brigadier- 
General Nicholson, respectively, com- 
mander and second In command of 
the Camp Meade Division, were un- 
able on account of .business to appear 
before the house judiciary eonimitte;; 
at the last hearing, but they 
authorized representative speakers 
against the pendlug legislation in their 
names. — Advt, 



colder breeds under th 
diflons of actual »mi 
KM 4 and 1018. 

Light Meres Not Raisstl 

Hiaea U " m iou«*t 

fniiiiers und afocktiji'ti i 

••as bofsee for the wsrkei 
•f lbs military mivU« »i>. 



ot 

ic-a 
ion 
great 
bleak 
' hair 
am! 
I In- 
li. ud ion 
between 



Forcasting the Future. 

People are not agreed about 
many other things, but most of 
them are in accord about the 
truth of that scriptural statement, 
"We cannot tell what a day 'nor 
an hour may bring forth.*' Noth- 
ing else so solemnizes our minda 
as the uncertainties of the future. 
Nobody knows how long he Is 
going to live; nor how his busi- 
ness ventures are coming out; nor 
at what hour the present civiliza- 
tion will collapse; nor when the 
end of the world will come ; nor 
what will be the issue of any 
project whatsoever. 

Cocksure as. reformers sometime* 
get to be about the working Of 
their theories, they do not reaf- 
fy know. The abolitionists could 
not forsee the consequences 67 
emancipation. The suffragists can 
nottyfl&rtfc - .ewilts of giving 

the ballots to women ; nor the 
antiHsaloon people the final ef- 
fects of prohibition. 

In answer to an Inquiry by the 
editors of the Literary Digest as 
to what the effect of "unscramb- 
ling the meat trust'' would have 
upon the prices of foodstuffs J. 
Ogden Armour answered "it is im- 
possible to forsee.»' 

And yet there Is a domain in 
which the ability to forecast the 
future has become an integral 
necessity in the life of man. In 
order to prevent the recurrence 
of those terrible famines which, 
in the past, have decimated peo- 
ples and arrested the progress of 
civilization, the Governments of 
the world must acquire a deeper 
knowledge of those economic laws 
which are more inviolable than 
those of the Modes and the Per- 
sians. Because they are inviofa- 
bk- »it woulr 1 -jeem nr » if A " 
must be discoverable. If man can 
tabulate those laws which govern 
the movements of the planets; if 
he can make a science of the 
forces that control the weatheir 
he must be able to know more 
than he does about reasons for 
such phenomena as the present 
high cost of living. We contemp- 
late that prodigy with 'the dull 
stupidity of Fiji Islanders watch- 
ing an eclipse And yet, in all 
human probability, it is a pro- 
digy comprehensible by man, and 
another generdtion, possibly tho 
very next, will have achieved -the 
solution of the problem of the 
high cost of living 11 will oe 
abbs to predetermine the amounts 
of different foodstuffs needed to 
supply the recurring want 1 * of the 
people; to advise the farmers 
bow much to plan I and inanagr 
an equitable distribution of the 
products of human labof 
■ M* \ t nit mr was right aUiul this 

'It 1-, iuip,»H«|h(,- 

lo t n|i it I' f feel lb. 

Utg of the trust vi ill hi 

tut tlu'ie i* a whavr and a bet>- 



■.. ■■! ■ J_, ' - " ' J , g »- 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court, Ky. 
Hattie B. Tilley Bums, Ac. PlfTs. 

against | No. 2983 Equity 
Susie Tilley, Ac, Defendant:'. 

By virtue of a judgment and order 
of sale rendered by the Boone Cir- 
cuit Court at its Dec. term, 1919. 
in the above styled cause, I shall 

Eroceed to offer for sale at the court 
ouse door, in Burlington, Boone 
county, Kentucky to the highest 
bidder, at public sale, on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February 1920, at one 
o'clock p. m. or thereabouts beiug 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
six and twelve months, the following 
property, to- wit: 

Lying and being in the town of 
Petersburg, Boone County. Ky., and 
being the weBt half of Lot No. 93 as 
laid down on the plan and plat of 
said town. 

For the purchase price the purch- 
aser of said real eBtate, with approv- 
ed security or securities,must execute 
bond, bearing o per cent interest from 
the day of sale until paid, and hav- 
ing the force and effect of a Judg- 
ment, with a lien retained therein 
until all the purchase money is paid. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
with these terms. 

CHAS. MAURER. 
Master Commissioner 

Commissioner's Sale. 

oone Circu it Court.. 

W. M. Walton, &c, Plaintiffs 

against ■{ Equity 
Elittor Walton, Defendants 

By virtue of a judgment and order of 
sale of the Boone Circuit Court, render- 
ed at the Dec. term, thereof 1919, in 
the above cause, I shall proceed to offer 
for sale at the eourt-house door in Bur- 
lington, Boone County. Ky., to the 
highest bidder at public auction, on 
MoiuIh.v the 2d day ol February, 1920, 
at 1 o'clock p. m , or thereabout, being 
county couriday, upon a credit of six 
and twelve months, the following 
described property, to- wit: 

Lying and being in Boone County, 
Kentucky, and bounded as follows, 
beginning at a stone on the road that 
leads from the Anderson Ferry road 
to Florence, corner of the lands of 
R. F. Cdutfcerbuck heirs; thence s 21$ 
w 26.20 chains to a store in a line of 
Win. Cloud; thence with his line n 
41 w 12.34 chains to a stone in the 
Anderson Ferry road; thence with 
the road n 18j e 13.52 chains, n 191. 
e 13.17 chains to a stone; thence with 
the road that leads from Anderson 
Ferry road to Florence s 41 J e 18.44 
chains to the beginning containing 
20 acres, 2 roods more or less and be- 
ing the same property conveyed by 
deed recorded in Deed Book No. 40 
page 497. 

The interest of the infant defend- 
ant will not be paid by the purchases 
but shall remain a lien on the said 
land bearing interest until the said 
infant become of age or until the 
guardian of said infant executes 
bond as required by section 497 of 
the civil code. 

For the purchase price the pur- 
chaser, with approved security or 
securities, must execute bond, bear- 
ing legal interest from the day of 
sale until paid, and having the force 
and effect of a Judgment, with alien 
retained therein until all the pur- 
chase money is paid. Bidders will 
l>e prepared to comply promptly 
with these terms. 

CHARLES MAURER, 

Master Commissioner 



Commissioner's Sale. 






Boone Circuit Court. 
Margaret Eshman's Quardian, Plff 
On Petition to | No. 8005 Equity. 
Sell Land. 

By virtue of a judgment and or- 
der of sale of the Boone Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December Term, 
thereof, 1919, iu the above cause, 
I shall proceed to offer for sale at the 
Court-house door in Burlington, Boone 
Co. Ky., to the highest bidder, at pub- 
lic sale on Monday the 2d day of Feb. 
1920, at 1 o'clock p. m., or thereabouts, 
being county court day, upon a credit 
of six and twelve months, the follow- 
ing described property, to wit: 

Lying and being in Boone County, 
Kentucky, and being Lot No. 3 iu 
the division of the land in case of 
Frank Walton, Ac, vs. Margaret 
Esbman, etc. Beginning at a stake 
in the Petersburg and Bellevue Road 
a corner with Lot No. 2; thence with 
a line of said Lot s o;i\ wBS chains to 
the upper corner of Lot No. 2 on the 
Ohio river; thence up the river n 36 j 
w 3 60-100 chains to the lower corner 
of Lot No. 4, including all lands west 
of said line; thence with a line of 
Lot No. 4 n 63J e 58.44 chains to the 
beginging, containing sixteen and 
one-half acres (16j.) 

The interest of the infant plaintiff 
Margaret Eshman shall not be raid 
hut shall remain a lien on the land 
nntil the said infant becomes of age, 
or until the guardian of said infant 
execute bond as required by section 
498 of the Civil Code. 

For the puichsse price the purchaser 
with approved security or securities, 
must execute bond, bearing legal inter- 
est from the day of sale until paid, and 
having the force and effect of a Jud«- 
*D»Vl«h a Hen retained therein un- 
til all the purchase money is paid. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
promptly with the.-e terra*. 
CHARLES MAURER. M. C. B. «.' 

Bichmond— Robt. Rowlett bouglu 
100 acres on the Lancaster piko 
from Virgil Gaines at $300, (Jalnes 
recently having bought it at $175 
per acre. 

Frankfort.— Efforts are under 
way to havo motor busea which 
transport rural school children 
exempted from license fee* and 
taxation. 

Maysvillo— Mark Twain was a 
schoolmate . and David Cruig, Liu 
coin's first law partner, a broth- 
er of Mrs Kllen Porter, S4 yosrs 
old, who died bore 

Princeton. — Af tor conducting » 
dry goods house here for fifty-* 
one years, Jacob (loldiiauier solo 
the business to Alfred Bhreatwald 

Who beat ei Prompted by a rSl«l 
upon <!•• Aoeh e( William Kobu, 
in which sheep valued at s<oo we*«* 
killed farmers are planning an 
Intensive campaign against dygs 



Commisciosar's Sale, 

Boone Circuit Court, Kentucky. 
Elizabeth Clore, Ac, plaintiffs, 

against | No. 2993, Equity. 
Agnes F. Spacy, Ac., defendants. 

By virtue of a judgment and order 
of sale of the Boone Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December term 
1919, in the above cause, I shall pro- 
ceed to offer for sale at the Court 
House door In the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., to the high- 
est bidder at public sale, on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February, 1990, at 1 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts, being 
County, Court day, upon a credit of 8 
and 12 months the following proper- 
ty, to-wlt* 

Lying and being In Boone County, 
Kentucky, near Belleview. Lot No. 
1, called the Hill Tract, and seta- 
part toElixabeth Grant,beginnlng at 
a stone, a little west of Middle creek 
in a line of the heirs of William 
Willis, deceased, and corner to 
M nomas Dinsmore, thence with 
Dinsmore's line and also a line of D. 
G. Rice n29Jw 115J poles to a stone, 
corner to said Rice in a line of the 
heirs of Ezekiel Rice, deceased; 
thence with a line of said heirs n60} 
e 21 poles to a stone, a corner of lot 
No. 2; thenoe with a line thereof 
s22Je 114 poles to a stone in a line of 
the Willis heirs aforesaid; thence' 
with It tOOjw 21 poles to the begin- 
ning, con tining fifteen (16) acres. 

Parcel "B" lying and being in 
Boone county, Ky., adjoining the 
town of Belleview, is bounded and 
described as follows: Beginning at 
an iron pin in the Burlington and 
Belleview road, corner of parcel 
"A:" thence with a dividing same, 
n2yje 21.24 feet, to a pin in a line of 
William Huey, corner of parcel A; 
thence with a line of said Huey 
n59jw 180$ feet to a stake, corner of 
lot No. 2 in a line of William Huey; 
thence with a line of No. 2s29Jn 21.24 
feet to a point in the center of the 
pike; thence with theconterof sane 
n60e 189 feet to the beginning, con- 
taining nine and ninety-four one 
hundredth acreB (994), called parcel 
L 'B" in the division of the seventeen 
acre tract as set out in the Commis- 
sioners' report and also the survey- 
or's report in this case. 

For the purchase price the purch- 
aser, with approved security or se- 
curities, must execute bonds bearing 
legal interest from the day of sale 
until paid, and having the force and 
effect of a judgment, with alien re- 
tained therein until all the purchase 
money is paid. Bidders will be pre- 
pared to comply promptly with these 

terms. 

CHAS. MAURER, 
Master Commissioner. 





Commissioner's Sale. 



♦- 



Boone Circuit Court, Kentucky. 
T. W. Cook, Executor, of Ben Cook, 
deceased, plaintiff, 
against | No. 2984. Equity. 
Lelia Cook, Ac , defendants. 

By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the special 
term thereof, 1920, in the above cause, 

1 shall proceed to offer for sale at 
the Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at public sale on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February, 1920, at 1 
p. m.. or thereabout, being County 
Court Day, upon a credit of 6 moths, 
the following property: 

Bounded and described as follows: 
Lying and being in Boone County, 
and bounded thus: Beginning at a 
point in the center of the Belleview 
and Waterloo road, corner with J. 
W. Portwood; thence with the road 
s43}w 8 chains, s41Jw 2.69 chains to a 
point in the center of said rood, cor- 
ner with homestead tract No. 1 ; then 
with the line of same s60f w 15 chains 
to a stake; thence n 66 w 7.66 chains 
to a post, corner with the homestead 
in a line of S. B. Scott; thence with 
Scott's line 1.43 chains to an Ash 
tree; thence n 40$ w 4.26 chains to a 
post corner with Scott and Ephriam 
Avlor; thence with Aylor's line n 
Iff e 10.42 chains to a post a corner 
with Aylor and J. W. Portwood; 
thence with Portwood's line s 67 e 
7.00 chains to a post; thence s 60 e 
10.21 chains to a post; thence n 28$ e 

2 41 chains ; thence b 60} e 12 chains 
to the beginning containing 25.97 
acres to be known as Tract No. 2. 

Tract No. 1 (Homestead) is bound- 
ed as follows: Lying and being£in 
Boone County, Kentucky, on the 
Waterloo and Rabbit Hash road and 
bounded as follows: Beginning at a 
point in the center of the Babbit 
Hash road a corner of Laura Clore; 
thence with Clore's line n 72J w 11.48 
chains to a post a corner with S. B. 
Scott; thence with Scott's line n 10t 
w 8.47 chains to a post a corner with 
Scott and Lot No. 2; thence with the 
line thereof n 56 a 7.66 chains to a 
stake; thence s 60} e 15 chains to a 
point in the center of the aforesaid 
pike; thence with same 41 8-4 w 1.00 
h 77$ w 3.81 chains, s 56$ w 3.88 elms. 
to the beginning containing 11.37 
acres. 

I will first sell tract No. 2 contain- 
ing 26.97 acres, land if said tract fails 
to produoe enough money to satisfy 
said Citizens Deposit Bank's debt, 
interest and cost, I will offer and 
seN enough 0/ tract No. 1, which is 
the homestead tract, to satisfy the 
balance of said bank debt, interest 
and costs; I will then sell the fee in 
tract No. 1 or Homestead or any 
part thereof that may theu remain 
unsold after the satifac.t ion of said 
bank debt, interest and costs, sub- 
ject, to the right of occupancy by- 
said widow. 

The above two # tracts of land be- 
ing the same conveyed to said dece- 
dent. Ben Cook, by J. W. Portwood 
and wife by deed recorded in Deed 
Book No. 67, page 210, Boone County 
Records. 

Amount of Citizens Deposit Bank 
debt, interest and costs, JHI0.72. 
Foil llie purc,ha»e price the purchaser, 
ultli sppioved security or securities, 
lined! xei ule hoiulM,beailUK If gal Inter 
pm( lioiu the day of pnIc until pnld,and 
ha< e tho force nud rflsol of a JudglOSSt, 
wiili a Hen retained ll>fr<-lri until all 
the puiohiuw ipouey In paid. Milder* 
will l»« prepitied to comply pioinplly 
with ilniw l«riin«. 

C1IAHI.RH MATHER. 

Master Commissioner 



Bui 



ribs 



a Sure 
Jatfener** 

Ihxedo Hog Ration 

UNTIL you feed Tuxedo Hog R*v 
t i on you can n o t know how cheap- - 
ly pork can be developed. Tuxedo is 
a quick fattener — a never-failing pro- 
ducer of live, sturdy, good looking 
hogs. The formula is compounded 
along lines suggested by a prominent 
State Experiment Station Official. 

Note of what Tuxedo Hog Ration is made, 
and you will understand Why it is so very 
nutritious: Digester Tankage, Corn Meal, 
Ground Barley, Ground Oats, Wheat Mid- 
dlings, Old Process Oil Meal, Gluten Feed, 
Alfalfa Meal. 

This balanced mixture is sweetened with 
Cane Molasses. 

■■■■■■■ ■ . —■ ■■■■- 1 ■ ■ ■ 1 I,. ^ 1 — ■■■■ — ■ ■— 1 ■ 1 i— 

A TVT A T VCTQ . PROTEIN 14.5%: FIBRE 7% 

/^.rN/"\.l-/ I OlO. CARBOHYDRATES 55%: FAT 3.5% 

Made by the Manufacturers of Tuxedo Chop, Ce-re-a-lia 
Sweets, Tuxedo Scratch, Ce-re-a-lia Egg Mash 

See Your Nearest Dealer 

FOR SALE BY 
A. DOLWICK, Constance. JACK BERKSHIRE, Petersburg. 

M. L. CRUTCHER, Hebron. A. F. MILNER, Constance. 

GULLEY A PETIT, Burlington. J. H. MANNIN, Hebron. 

STANSIFER & POWERS, Walton. 




ZXrXXMZXrXX* 



A. E. FOSTER & SON 

FARM SALESMEN AND 

LICENSED AUCTIONEERS 

No. 3 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 

Will be pleased to talk over with you, either the sale 
or purchase of farm property. 



jaiAAAAAAJi^AAAfai^A 3> 3», x: 





■THE- 
KITCHEN 
CABINET 




I think he conquers all who wins content. 
Take what you may 

Of proffered Bood: accept life as It stands 
And make the most of IU awift-HeeUn* 
daya. 




- MORE SALADS. 

Sweet salftds make a roost dnlnty 
di'snert, which is easy to prepare and 
much more wholesome In 
hot weather than pud- 
dings and heavy des- 
serts. 

Banana With Rarp- 
berriea. — Peel small ba- 
nanas nnd cut In hnlves 
lengthwise, spread with 
raspberry Jam or the 
fresh fruit crushed nnd 
sweetened, lay on a let- 
tuce leaf and serve with a sour cream 
dressing or with a simple French dress- 
ing. 

Cottage Cheese Salad. — Shape small 
flat cakes of nicely seasoned eottage 
cheese, make a depression In the cen- 
ter with n spoon and fill with any fa- 
vorite Jelly or jam. Serve ou a plute 
or fresh lettuce. 

Dutch Salad. — Arrange well washed 
and drained let luce In a bowl. Pour 
over three or four tablespoonfuls of 
hot bacon fat, season wllli salt and 
pepper, then add a tablespoonful or 
two of hot Vinegar. Serve sprinkled 
with bits of fried bacon or minced ham. 
Onion may be added to this snlnd, or 
not. as the taste dictates. 

The average boiled dressing Is 
spoiled by the addition of too. much 
mustard. It Is safe to cut down near- 
ly all proportions of mustard In most 
recipes one-half and In many throe- 
fourths. One-fourth of a tenspoonful 
of mustard is sufficient to season an 
ordinary recipe for salad dressing. 
Mustard la highly Irritating, ns one 
knows when it Is used as a plaster for 
fh» skin, so It Is reasonable to sup- 
pose that the delicate membrane of 
the digestive tract Is also Irritated by 
Its use. For most tastes an eighth 
of a tcaspoontoil Is sufficient to give 
the desired flavor, and In some dress- 
ings a pinch is all that Is required. 

8imple Russian Salad. — Arrnoga a 
howl of crisp lettuce and heap chopped, 
seasoned tomatoes on the lettuce. Serve 
with any desired salad dressing. 

Cottage Cheese Salad. — Take a pint 
of cottage cheese, add two tablespoon- 
fuls each nf shredded ehtves und 
minced parsley, or green peppers, sea- 
son with salt, add one -half capful of 
salad dressing and four mpftlla of 
shredded IPttUCS, Reap the chciie 00 
the oasts "i lettuce und serve at unci'. 



— Both Piiomeb — 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 

Boone House, •♦ 
BURUINQTON, « KY. 

Prompt Attention to all Calls. 



FOR SALE 



A $200 Piano Player, Mahogany 
finish, in excellent condition, can be 
used on any style piano, and about 
80 music rolls. Would make a One 
Christmas present. Price, S60. 
MRS. W. M. COREY. 

Phone 2X Erlanger, Ky. 



Attention lota Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 
repairing- on all makes or cars. 
Starter and generator work a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Aylor, 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 




WHY BUY A SCRUB 
SIRE 

JERSEY HILL FIRM 

The Home of Pure Bred 

JERSEY CATTLE 

— and— 

Chesterwhite Hogs 

offers for sale a few choice boar 
pigs. Prices Reasonable. 

S. B. RYLE, 

R. 1 Grant, Ky., 

Farmers Phone. 




+4.4.+++++++++++++++++++++++ 

TAKK YOUIt COUNTY I'Al'BH. 

♦♦♦♦+♦ f-+ ►♦♦♦"* H- ♦+♦+♦♦+♦+ 1 » 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦••♦♦ 



Out in the State. 

Carlisle.— Farmers are boing com 
polled to import corn and hay in 
large quantities because floods fol 
lowing drought eliminated both 
crops. 

Louisville.— Women's clubs of the 
Stato will work for a bill lncrens 
ing the minimum marriage age 
for girls Trom 12 to 16 years. 

Lexington— The peaco treaty is 
!>eing studied at the University ot 
Kentucky, preparatory to the na- 
tion-wide students vote Tuesday 
on ratification. 

Lancaster.— Farmers find thenn 
selves in a gamble with tho sea- 
sons, rains havirig prevented fall 
plowing and an early spring be- 
ing tho remaining hope. 

Ashland —Wielding a frozen Itn 
key aa a nine pound Olub, Ucorge 
Rood knocked un nriued highway- 
limn from his produce wagon and 
led htm In the road dssvd 



it 



r» 



ittttM' 



Akis 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. xxxxv 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY JANUARY 22, 1920 



$1.50 Per l ear 



No 17 



SERVICE IS REMEDY 
FOR INDUSTRIAL CHAOS 

■■—». 

Apply Democracy |to Industry 

Is Advice of American 

Economic Sooiety. 
* 

An attitude of service is the 
only remedy for the present in- 
dustrial chaos. This was the dom- 
inant tone of the convention of 
the American Economic Society at 
Chicago last week, as reported 
by Walter J Matherly Head of tho 
Department of Economics at the 
Georgetown College. 

Pour great industrial problems 
confront creative thinkers in 1920, 
Prof. Matherly said, Internation- 
al democracy must be established, 
the high cost of living reduced, 
and the railroad problem solved. 
These questions wore discuosed fui 
ly by the economists and busi- 
ness men at Chicago. 

Foreign moneys are at the low- 
eat rate since the beginning of 
foreign exchange. The English 
pound sterling, which in normal 
times sells for S4.87, is now worth 
only $3.74. The French franc has 
dropped from 19 cents to 10 cents. 
The German relachraark, formerly 
worth 24 cents, is hardly worth 2 
cents 'now in United States money. 
This conditio* of foreign ex- 
change means that the United 
States will be forced to accept 
payment for all exports in foreign 
goods. It means also that Amer 
ica will have to make all foreign 
accounts of long duration. 

There are three forces to be 
taken into consideration,- the Ken 
tucky economist said in discuss- 
ing industrial problems. These are 
dissatisfaction on the part of 
workers with tho nature of indus* 
try, dissatisfaction with the man- 
agement of industry, and dissatis- 
faction with the worker's share in 
industry. Democratic princples 
must be applied to industry as 
well as government, Prof. Mather- 
ly believes, and the absentee 
owner must be eliminated as far 
a a possible. 

There are three remedies, he 
said, for the high cost of livng. 
An increase in production is the 
principal remedy. During 1919 
production in the U. S. actually 
decreased while in other coun- 
tries it increased. A second rem- 
edy is to deflate currency. There 
is too great an in.'utiotn of cur- 
rency at present, and this brings 
about speculation. Thrift is the 
third remedy for the high cost of 
living. 

The railroad problem is perplex- 
ing, the Kentuckian declared. The 
Plum plan is discredited though 
it contains many good points. Mr. 
Glenn E. Plum was present at tho 
convention' and made a very sane 
and affective plea for his own so- 
lution of the .railroad problem. 



They Art Beginning to See It 

There is evidence that peopfe 
off the farm* are beginning to 
estimate the people on the farm* 
at a bit nearer their true value, 
and that business, professional 
and laboring men are beginning to 
see that the farmer, too, is a 
factor to be considered in any 
adjustment of industrial relations. 

The epidemic of strikes, selfish, 
and foolish as it has been, has 
not been without some by-pro- 
ducts of good. It has, for one 
thing, led the farmer to protest 
so that other men must hear his 
protest. "Capitalists*' and "labor- 
ers'' alike have been brought to 
tho point of asking what would 
happen if the farmer should 
strike; and fair-minded city peo- 
ple have been brought to the 
Soint of seeing that the fa/mer 
i a laborer— the country's most 
poorly paid laborer fer the work 
he does— as well as a businessman 
—the business man on whom the 
burden of price readjustment is 
being deliberately laid. 

These things city i people ere 
beginning to understand. It is 
our duty as farmers to see that 
they are made fully to understand 
them. We must keep on explain- 
ing and protesting until only the 
wilfnlly ignorant can imagine 
that all a farmer gets for his 
crops is pure gain, and until only 
the wilfully thoughtless are will- 
ing to see production lessened 
by inadequate pay to the pro- 
ducer. — Southern Agriculturist. 



FEDERAL ROAD 

MAYBE BUILT. 



HE4RT TO HEART TALK 



Marshall-riuey. 

The marriage of Miss Louise 
Marshall of Detroit, Michigan, and 
Mr. George Wm. Huey, of Louis- 
ville, was solemnized January 3, 
at the home of the bride's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Marshall, 
in Detroit, Mich., the Rev. O. M. 
Huey, the father of the groom, 
officiating. The brdesmaida were 
Miss Margaret Harfan of LouisvUIe 
and Miss Helen Bicknel of Findlay, 
Ohio. The groomsmen were Mr 
Edward Huey and Mr. Nelson 
Dickey. The bride wore .a white 
satin dress with a court train. 
Her veil was caught with orange 
blossoms, and she carried a bou- 
quet of bride rose* and lillies of 
the valley. Miss .Haraln wore a 
dress of shell pin It <vtfin and ear- 
Ward roses and pink 



Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D. 
I have asked it of him and God 
is giving it to me, in ever-increas 
ing measure, THE SHEPHERD 
HEART. The loftiest position a 
mortal can hold is mine — that of 
being the spiritual leader of a band 
of God's believing people. 1 trem- 
ble as I think of the vast re-« 
jponsibility of my position, and, 
yet, it thrills me as I try to 
measure, to some extent, the op- 
portunities and the privileges that 
are mine. So long as I have the 
strength of mind, heart and body 
to bring to the attention of my 
beloved people the rich, deep 
things of our God, I would not 
exchange places with an arch- 
angel around the thrown on high 
I love God's truth. I love God's 
people and I love to strive, un- 
der God, to seek to be the 
channel of spiritual blessings un- 
to the people I serve. My deep, 
abiding interest in the highest 
welfare of my people leads me to 
give myself to much of fervent 
intercessory prayer for them, and, 
one thing has deeply impressed 
me. As I recall one by one the 
names and faces of my people, 
there is not one who doea not 
need the Lord's favor and bless- 
ing. In eveery single home, there 
are conditions, of one «ort or 
another, that call loudly for" pray- 
er before God— the saved children, 
unconverted lives, worldliness, for 
getfutness of God, affliction, be- 
reavement, anxiety, doubt— afnat 
the endless and distressing story 
of human need everywhere. To 
stand before the king of kings as 
an inticessor is a privilege and 
a responsibility. As I can not see 
dnd be with my people as much 
as I desire, I find a sweet Joy 
and restjfulqiess in pleading for 
them (by name before God's throne. 
Perhaps, many of them do not) 
realise their own need. Alas! that 
ia one of the most painful phas- 
es of the whole situation. The 
things of the world engross the 
the affections and attentions and 
the Just estimate of values is lost. 
So, there is in every home in all 
the land need for prayer to God 
for light, knowledge and bless- 

with 
the shepherd heart, finds occas- 
ion for talking to God about his 
people and their need of his fa- 
vor and blessing. 
Union, Ky. 



There is yet hope for the Fed- 
eral Aid Highway coming through 
Gallatin county from Louisville 
to Cincinnati. Two weeks ago the 
road was deemed impossible on ac 
count of Carroll and Boon? coun- 
ties falling down on the proposi- 
tion, but recent assurances from 
Col. W. B. Belknap, of Louisville, 
as given in a letter to Ben My- 
lor, chairman of the road com- 
mission in this county, indicate 
that there is yet a chance for the I 
road being built. 

Mr. Belknap has all along l>een ] 
one of the staunchest advocates 
of the road and has given both I 
his time and money in the inter- | 
est of the . proposed highway. , 
There *is no doubt that he Wants 
the road to be built, for he has 
given the most convincing proof 
of his interest all through. 

He realizes the advantage the 
road will be to Louisville, aside 
from the great advantage and con 
venience it will be to the people 
of the counties through which fV 
will pass, and is not ttt all dis- 
posed to give up the proposition. 
If the same peraervance in the face 
of apparent . difficulties in mani- 
fested by all people living along 
the route, the road will yet be 
built. 

Mr. Belknap, in his letter tfc> 
Mr. Mylor, stated that the roan 
must go through, and that he 
would give liberally to the three 
counties, Gallatin, Boone and Car- 
roll, if it became necessary to 
do so in-order to bring their pri- 
vate subscription to the amount 
desired. 

The statement that emanted 
from one of the counties, Boone 
or Carroll, it Is not clear just 
which, that Gallatin had fallen 
down on the proposition was pal- 
pably false, and was ^evidently cir 
eulated with the malicious inten- 
tion of shifting the blame for tho 
road falling through from the 5e- 
linquent counties to Gallatin. At 
the time that the* project was re- 
garded as hopeless and word was 
passed that irt was a failure on 
account of the delinquency of 
Carroll and Boone counties, Gal- 
latin county was within less than 
$20,000 of the goaf, and the:: 1 
was sufficient assurance to war- 
rant that this amount could be 
easily raised from sources that it 
was known would produce the 
money. 

If Carroll and Boone counties 
will prove as responsive to this 
proposition as Gallatin the) road 
can and will be with the aid of 
Col. Belknap and other interests 
of Louisville and Cincinnati, built, 
and every effort should be made 
to that end. The Federal Aid High 
way through Gallatin, Carroll and 
Boone counties is the path of pro- 

Sess, and every citizen of the 
tee counties "mentioned should 
be progressive enough «x> realize 
that fact and act accordingly.— 
Warsaw Independent. 



Send The Poor Individuals 

To Tho Pork Barrel 

Hogs may have the same bfood 
lines and may be* of the same 
litter, yet they will not be uni- 
form either in size or quality, no 
matter what .the breed. There is 
usually one unusually good one, 
with one following closely to him 
and then several two or three 
degrees below them in quality 
and then there may be one in- 
ferior in quality, the runt, and 
sometimes there is more than one 
runt. 

As a. rule the pork barrel is | 



GONE TO HIS REWARD. 

Former Resident of Boone Co. 
Died at Hie Home at Ml 

Washington, Ohio. 



William Lancaster died at his 
home in Mt. Washington, 0., last 
Christmas day,, after an illness of 
about four months, resulting from 
his breaking one of his legs while 
visiting his son at William&town. 
Ky., his misfortune developing 



pneumonia. 

He was born at Richwood, Boone 
the final destination o the runt , county Ky Scpt mh 1836 He 

as the runt usually produces^runts ! WM marr f ed t( j Mary A Tanner, 

November 6th, 1858, and they 
si»erit together 61 years of mar- 
ried life. Six children were born 
in the home, three of whom, Wm. 
1 Loe and Edith, with the mother 

k pri l*; 9 ^ EZIud eleven grandchildren survive 
brought the too . Hp was a 6 mcmber of V enus 

!_ **L *_3"LL™:ii! Lodge of Odd-Fellows, of Florence 
for nearly forty years, and at tho 
age of 81 he was converted ana 
joined the M. E cfiurch and show- 
ed by his life he had made his 
peace with God and feft a splen- 
did Christian testimony of his ac- 
ceptance with the Heavenfy Fath- 
er. 

He was a kind and loving hus- 
band, indulgent father and a good 
neighbor. 

if he were to talk to you in 
scripture verses, he would say: 

'•In such an hour as ye think 
not, the Son of Man cometh.'' 

'•Make your calling and election 
sure.'' 

"Not everyone that sayeth Lord ! 
Lord ! shall enter into the King- 
dom of Heaven, but he that doeth 
the will of my father who art in 
Heaven.'' 

'•Ask and ye shall receive' 

"As far as the eist is from 
the west, so far hath He remov- 
ed our transgressions from Un.» ; 

"Tho your sin* be as scarlet, 
they shall be white as snow. Tho' 
they be as crimson, they shallt 
be as wool.'' 

"Be thou faithful ur:.io death, 
and I will give theo a crown of 
life.'' 

A. FRIEND. 

Members of the family wish to 
thank the Florence I. O. O. F. lodge 
members who took part in the 
beautiful and impressive cere- 
mony at the cemetery on the day 
of his burial. 



and the breeder is not inthebusi 
ness to produce runts. There are, 
however, exceptions to this rufe 
and some runts have had in them 
the making of good pigs and have 
taken the coveted prizes in the 
show ring and 
in the sale ring 
the small pig has to fight its, way 
to the teat, and afterwards at 
the trough and has been kept 
beneath the others on account of 
its size, but which has responded 
wonderfully for good feeding and 
has mads good and come to the 
front surprising its owners. Give 
the runts a chance by separating 
them from the larger pigs in the 
litter and starting them off with 
good feed and the chance to eat 
it without being crowded out by- 
pigs larger than it, then if it 
does not respond to the extra 
care and still remains a runt, it 
and the other poor individuals 
should be the culls and it pays 
to cull close. 



Value to Kentucky Farmers. 

The value to Kentucky farmers 
of thirteen of their principal crops 
in 1919 was *4O0,751,000, which is 
$5^,165,000 more than in 1918, or 
approximately 16 per cenl greater 
than the t3i6,'j<B,090 produced in 
1918, altho the total quantity of 
production of all these crops in 
1919 was about four per cent less 
than in 1918, according to the 
annual revised estimates of Ken- 
tucky issued by the I.' S. Bureau 
of Crop Estimate*. This valua- 
tion includes com, wheat, oats, 
rye, barb y, potatoes, sweet po- 
tatoes, totac<-D, hay, sorghum, 
sirup, clover seed, peaches anti 
apples. 

The leading crops in v.uu? were, 
tobacco, »in,383,eO), corn, -17- 
87.j,00U, hay, 330,619,039, wheat jSS,- 
381,000, and potatoes 410,58 1,00<>. If 
apples and peaches be excluded 
tne field crops show approximate 
ly 3 per cent decrease in man city 
of production under 1118, but the 
total vaiuL' of 1919 crops shows an 
increase of about 16 per cent over 
1018, altho corn, wheat, rye and 
bailey were less than In 1918. 

This increase in value is almost 
entirely due to increased price* of 
tobacco, the total value of the 
191R tobacco crop b?ing estimated 
at rl7 1,381,000 compared to $123,- 
715,0)0 in 1916 This is bassdonan 
estimated average price of 38.2 
centa a pound for all types of 
tobacco grown in Kentucky. This 
estimate of the value of the 
State's tobacco crop may prove 
too lot or too high, depending 
on the pi ices at which the re- 
mainder of the crop is sold. 



LOSS PLACED AT $38,400 

When i6 Barrels of Whisky Are 
Stolen at Covington. 



To Make Sure ot Binder Twine 

For much of its supply of bin- 
der twine or henequen, the United 
States has long depended upon 
Yucatan. During the past several 
years, the uncertainty of this 
supply has caused serious anxiety 
lest there should not be enough 
binder twine to harvest the in- 
creasing crops of grain in this 
country. The U. S. Department of 
Agriculture has been making dili- 
gent efforts to find new sources 
of supply or new regions Vhere 
binder twine fibers may be pro- 
duced and the chief of ihe Bureau 
of Plant Industry reports very en- 
couraging results. The conditions 
in limited areas, extreme southern 
Florida and on the' larger keys, 
are regarded as suitable for the 
production of sisal and hene- 
quen fibers, provided the cost of 
land and of labor is not too high 
to permit successful competition. 
For several years, henequen has 
Veen successfully cultivated in 
Cuba and the plantations are be- 
ing increased, but thus fat-, they 
produce scarcely enough fiber to 
supply the cordage mills on the 
island. Conditions for tho pro- 
duction of binder twine fibers in 
limited aueas in Haiti and over a 
much larger area in Santo Domin- 
go, are regarded as favorable. Ex- 
perimental planting in Porto Rico 
nave resulted in the establishment 
of a commercial plantation near 
Yauco and triaf ' plantings near 
Quebradaiias and on Mona Island 
have given promising growth. In 
the Philippines, the introduction 
of modern fiber-cleaning machines 
has resulted in increased plantings 
M sisal and private capital has 
bought and installed machines to 
develop the industry on a Iarg».v 

scale. 



TONS OF PAPER WASTED. 



rled Mrs. 

sweet peas. Miss Bicknef's dress*, ..ig. Every hour the pastor 
was orchard satin. She carried a 
bouquet of Mrs. Ward roses and 
orchid sweet peas. After the cere- 
mony a reception was given at 
the home of the bride's parents, 
and after a trip East Mr. and 
Mrs. Huey will be ab home Feb- 
ruary 1, at the Cortland! The Rev. 
and Mrs. O. M", Huey and Mjtv atno 
Mrs. Lloyd Huey of Louisville, at- 
tended the wedding. — Louisville 
Times, 10th inst. 



Think About It. 

The question is being asked by- 
tobacco growers from all sections 
of the Burley belt why is it that 
a higher general average for to- 
bacco is recorded at Lexington 
than any other market. This is 
plain when the facts are known. 
The territory surrounding Lex- 
ington raises the best quality of 
tobacco in the whole district, and 
this year, especially, the quality 
is much superior than elsewhere 
Another good reisoi in the fact 
that many growers in the hill 
counties who have first-class crops 
ari» shipping them to Lexington, 
believing that thr«*' can get more 
for their tobacco there, which is 
not true when the real facts are 
known This leave * a no >r quality 
of tobacco on . the smaller mar- 
kets and of course curs the g< -n- 
eral average down at least $20 on 

on the hundred pounds Vttjt any 
of the loose leaf houses in Fal- 
mouth and you wlJI BM that th" 
snme grade of tobacco bringa al 
imnh here us it does \l Li-xlng- 
ton Falmouth Ollttook 

Carried $20,000 Inturanoe. 



Water the Cows. 



In every one hundred pounds of 
milk there is 87 pounds of wat- 
er. It is absolutely necessary, 
therefore, that the cow shall be 
supplied with liberal quantities 
of water. The more milk the cow 
produces the more water she wifl 
require. Ordinarily a cow needs 
about two and one-half pounds 
of water for each pound of milk 
given. The only 'safe rule to fol- 
low is to furnish tho C|OW all 
the water she will drink at least 
twice a day, and preferably often 
cr. It is important that this 
water should be pure and of a 
temperature which will make cer- 
tain that the cow will drink her 
fill 



NOTICE. 
s. o H. R. Leidy for D*»lco Light* and 
Power Plant • who is now Dolort ser- 
vice man in thla count] ; In- will be 
glad to explain" the necessity anil 
convenience of Deltio Lights. 

Florence, Ky. 11. I). 
Phone, Burlington Hi, 

DicOJJGHT 

The Complete Electric Light end 
Fewer Pleat 

i If 'IkIh h mi pawi I for l< M Ihe 
v an iii'c 1 1 • * > la lei < 



Mrs Oenrge Dttgsl . of 


NUilitf 


Hun, moth i of MlM II 




Was recently bui'fti ' 
at the Hugh Mdi 






Mil molve |M,<M 

Ml 






L.'?_ri 



f%t 



• vl' 



I WANK A. AVI UHt «. K 



C. E. Quick, proprietor of 
Quick's distillery, on the Madison 
pike at the foot of Independence 
Hill, reported to J. C. DoMoss, 
agent in charge of ths internal 
revenue office at Covington, that 
16 barrels of whisky had been 
stolen from his warehouse, which 
adjoins the distillery. 

The loss was di>clo<ied when 
field deputies went to the ware- 
house yesterday to take an in- 
ventory. The warehouse had been 
entered from an adjoining build- 
ing and a rear door unlocked 
from the inside. Each barrel was 
supposed to have contained forty 
gallons, making a total of 610 
gallons, which, estimated at the 
bootleg price of $60 a gallon, 
would be worth $38,400. 

It is believed the liquor was 
carried away in a truck, although 
no traces of a vehicle could be 
found. 

Keep An Eye on Your Flock. 

Persons who own sheep should 
keep a close watch on their flocks 
as dogs have been attacking flocks 
recently in some parts of the coun 
ty. Sheep are very valuable ani- 
mals ju3t now, and a Worthless 
dog or two can ruin a large 
bunch In a very sort time by 
frightening the others. The lamb- 
frightening te others. The lamb- 
ing season is clow at hand and 
it is hard to estimate the value 
of a good ewe at this time. The 
sheep industry has increased ma- 
terially in this county in the last 
few years and some very fine an- 
imals have been brought in by 
Clock owners for the purpose of 
breeding up their stork, and the 
i prese ii of a strange dog on 
[premises where sheep are kept 
justifies tin- use of a gun that can 
lUtKl on to bring deatlvtotbo 
lutrudi r a i l doatroyar of sheep. 
pint, cl >on ■ shoen 

; County to Receive Xeily Truck 

Counts Jud| - Kl Id I! i •• >iv©d 

| notice Moiiil.i\ lii. !-i" her truck 

a thres*ton K \\\, would i».' uwutt 

i ing MiM'in- i mi and 

Mlti'i iio> .'J. nl in -i I H • trurh wU) 

.. ot for mi" . i " I 

It I to || I i lii* l * * ill it V 

Willi l"i 

in iMt rump K n ' 



Dairy Interesta Awake. 



The dairy interests of Kentucky 
seem , to have a Wakened at last 
to the great possibilities of the 
dairy business in this state. The 
Agricultural College and the Ex- 
periment Station have done a 
T»Teat work in demonstrating the 
wonderful natural advantages en- 
Joyed by Kentucky and this has 
resulted in more real interest be- 
ing displayed than has ever been 
known before. 

The wonder is that Kentuckians 
have been so slow in taking ad- 
vantage of the wonderful soil and 
climatic conditions that make 
Kentucky the greatest dairying 
state in the union. 

While it is true that we have 
some good dairies in the state, as 
a general business proposition Ken 
tucky is still far behind other 
states that have nothing like the 
natural advantages that obtain 
here. Kentuckians have heretofore 
attempted nothing but the sale of 
whole milk and cream. Uttle 
thought having bwi given to the 
by-products. Cheese making has 
not played a part In the industry. 

Those in charge of the big 
dairy meeting and show to be held 
at Lexington, Jan. W, are much 
pleased with tho interest that is 
being msnifested by dairymen all 
over the state. As prominent 
•speakers from other slate* will 
participate and as several hun Ire ■« 
dollars in premiums are offered 
for best samples of milk, cream, 
butter ami, cottage cheese, H is 
anticipated that there will be the 
largest attendance e\< i known at 
a uke meeting lu the state 

Plenty of Boozo in Kentucky. 

Louisville. Jan 16 Kentuel ! 

distillers still |iiim. s. (Mill mil- 
lion gallons of liquor I iday, Ot* 
iaat day bcforsi oottstitutlonnl pro 
bibltion cornea into full force and 
effect, notwithstanding their i< 
tompti to export it The lasi un- 
olfifUI figures ostimatod thai 
35,000, ami gallons ot whisk} valued 
hi eppintlmnttdy H00,doo,o00, 
maiued on bonded witvlimie'a > ■' 

I. «, llllSv 'I I ! I ' ■ . . • • 



USELESS OFFICES HIT. 

Abolitkn Planned in Bills Before 

the Legislature 

Frankfort, Jan. 18. — Convening 
tomorrow for the third week of 
the session, the Legislature will 
begin consideration of bills, the 
most important of which will be 
measures providing for additional 
appropriations for state hospitals 
for insane and feeble minded. Next 
in order will be bills abolishing 
useless offices,' principally the 
forestry and the motor vehicle de 
partments. 

Governor Edwin P. Morrow is 
gathering data for his message to 
the Legislature concerning state 
financial conditions. No radical 
changes will be urged. 

Adjutant General Deweese has 
prepared for introduction a meas 
ure destined to increase the effi- 
ciency of the, State Military De- 
partment and to remove it from 
politics. It provides for reduction 
of the office force o» 12 to 6, 
a saving of something like $5,001) 
annually. 

The measure seeks to increase 
the salary of the Atjutant Gen- 
eral from $2,000 annually to $3,000, 
and the Assistant Adjutant Gen- 
eral from $1,20) to $2,000. The only- 
other officer provided for in the 
bill is that of supply officer, at 
an annual salary of $1,500. The 
bill makes the supply officer re- 
sponsible for equipment at Frank 
fort belinging to the state and 
to the War Department. 

Senator Burton declared in a 
fort belonging to the state and 
he will not return for the remain- 
der of the session is denied by 
him. He wired that he will be here 
tomorrow. 



LXamples Show How, Government 
Contributes te Shortage. 

So much has been said by Gov- 
ernment officials about the short- 
age of paper and the necessity of 
conserving wood pulp and other 
materials of which paper is made 
that it is difficult to account for 
the unwillingness of Federal bu- 
reaus to use paper only for nec- 
essary business. The Interstate 
Commerce Commission is clashed 
among the most conspicuous was- 
ters of good paper ; how many tons 
are spoiled every year in the mak- 
ing out of worthless reports no 
one knows, but any one familiar 
with railroad business is in a 
position to say that the drain on 
the paper mills is heavy. 

The statement that the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad s^nds 110,000 re- 
ports a year to Washington for 
the lines east of Pittsburg gives 
an idea of the quantities of paper 
consumed annually on the rail- 
road systems of the country, ana 
a semiofficial estimate that 500 
reports a year would meet all 
reasonable requirements of the 
easterly part of the Pennsylvania 
lines is probably not far from 
being correct. 

The asking of ''food questions"- 
is one explanation of the abnor- 
mally large number ' of reports 
required. Duplication of reports 
is another. Railroad men say that 
they are continually being called 
upon for detailed reports and sta- 
tistics already on file in Washrng- 
Con. It is much easier for a 
clerk to send manifold letters of 
iri|Uiry than to look on the 
files to see whether the same 
question has not already been an- 
swered, and the result is the wast- 
ing of paper and loss of time hi 
the railroad offices. And who 
ever reads the mass of worthless 
stuff stored in basements and oth- 
er out-of-the-way places in Wash 
ington? 

Yet the accumulations call for 
large expenditures Of money at a 
tim.? when the need of conserva- 
tion is piessing. A reformation or 
the prccices of the Interstste Com 
mcrce Commission and other Fed- 
eral bureaus is evidently desirable. 
—Providence Journsi 



Breeding Fine Hampshires. 

Hubert Ryle and son, of Rabbit 
Hash precinct, were business vis- 
itors to Burlington last Saturday 
aitt rnoon, and while in town call- 
ed at this office and made ar- 
rangements for advertising their 
herd of thoroughbred Hampshire 
hogs. Thev are among the coun- 
ty's best breeders of hogs and 
are recognized the country over 
as producers of the very best 
strains of the Hampshire. Mr. Ryle 
is a pretty good farmer besides 
being a breeder of fine hogs and 
only a few days ago he sold a crop 
of 2,660 pounds of tobacco on the 
Madison, Indiana, loose leaf mar- 
ket at 654 cents a pound all round. 



Signei by Governor Morrow. 



ign- 
1L 



Frankfort, Ky , Jan t6-The res- 
olution ratifying the woman'* »uf- 
f i aire amendment to the consti- 
tution, passed on the opening 
day of the l.' gisUtture, was si 

pd tol iv by >io\ Morrow 
Signed H^bo the lesolution culling 
on Congress to pit t a oill no» 
pending tq m ike Mammoth Cave 
a national park The nan with 
Which Gov, Morrow signed llu- 
MiluSge iitiolntion Will l»e pre 
iillted to Mrs John ii South, ot 

this <iiv, former Pr aside nrf o( tin- 
State equal Kights Amkh-hi ion 
Hh • in » con-on of liui Morrow 



Changing Business. 

Jack Eddins, of the firm of Ed- 
dins Bros., and Wallace Rice will 
enter the realm of the farmers 
about the first of next mpnth 
when the latter will resign his 
position |as assistant Natonaf Bank 
Examiner. Mr. Kerr, the road 
man, has rented the garage ia 
Burlington from which the two 
Eddins Bros., will retire, and it is 
said that Stanley Eddins will also 
take up farming. The firm of Ed- 
dins & Rice, will take charge of 
Edward Rice's fine 160 acre farm 
on the river hill a short distance 
above Lawrenceburg ferry. 

Two Long, Tiresome Trips 

Dudley Blyth and Mont SiaybAck ' 
nvi\id V. C. Robinson to Uotds- 
ville last Saturday in Mr myth's 
truck They arrived shortly after- 
noon last Sunday 






II 



IOI 

.HI. 



(Ml 



if I I 



Elmer Kirkpacric 


k tin 


k 


! ::il!>ll 


Cabon's ami \\' L 


St.- 


,1, 


'Ah' to- 


bacco to F.il n >u! 


Ii lis: 


s 


t> iiiilay, 


tlr y ha\ in£ sold 


:i f 


, A 


u ir 1 ,', 


a^o to a ralmoui 


1, | ,, s 


• :' 


i h vi via 


.t. il thi ir neighbo 






II • .lit 


Aiqiun^ H.nn OUli 


»u •'./ 


■q 


pui 


night. 




il. 




Tanner ■ 


Youi 




Mr il »i • i 




i 


it Mi*t 


Flora \ ouell *it< 




i 


, Mu- 


IttMtdn of ho 






ll the 


l.illh 






iath, 


I'y in*" puaior, lii 


^ i , 






vi' r i '. 






Mi 


urn! Mm 






1 III 'II 


1 






4 l»llillg 



I 

i 



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Moa 



■■ 



isiiigs 



HSBE 



THURSDAY JAN. 48, 1118. 



♦♦♦< 

• 



WALXO 



♦ here is, not In a k* A 



Jerry M. Jackson of Hume, spent 
Monday here on business. 

Born.— To Mr. and Mrs. Hugh 
Arnold, Jan. - 17th, a fine son. 

Cecil Fornash, of Covington, 
•pent Sunday here with friends 

County Attorney BemJ. Riley and 
Rev. Edgar C. Riley of Burlington, 
were visitors here Monday on bua- 
ineas. 

Rev. and Mrs. D. EL Bedinger left 
last week for Orlando, Florida, to 
spend the balance of the winter 
with friends 

Wm. Sparks of Covington, Chas. 
A. Slater and son Dr. J. Q. Slater 
of Ludlow, were guests of friends 
here Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Adams of 
Latonia, spent Sunday here the 
guests of her sister Mrs. Robert 
Q. Moore and family. 

James Lillard of Napoleon, ana 
Elmer Elliston of Elliston, spent 
Thursday here attending the loose 
leaf tobacco sales. 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Jones of 
Landing, left last week for Mesa, 
Arizona, to spend a month with 
their son Jesse Jones and family. 

Geo. L. Miller, of Landing, spent, 
part of last week here the guest 
of his son Jnq. C Miller, going 
to Louisville to visit his daugh- 
ter Mrs. Will Smith. 

Bernard W. Gaines of Burlington, 
spent Wednesday here and had 
a lot of fine tobacco on sale at 
the loose leaf market, averaging 
about $65.00 per cwt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morris of 
Warsaw, spent the past week here 
with their daughter Mrs. Hugh 
Arnold and are helping nurse the 
baby born last Saturday. 

Walter Brown, of Ryle, Gallatin 
county, was here Saturday on. bus- 
iness. He bought the farm of J. 
M. Powers near Verona and will 
move there next March. 

Chas. L. Griffith, spent part of 
last week at Midway, Woodford 
county, attending a meeting of one 
of his oil companies. The iepoit 
-showed a very promising condi- 
tion. 

Martin Emeral of Kenton coun- 
ty, was her© Friday arranging for 



JOONl COUNTY KlCOKDll 



Pythlaa would be held at Walton, 
Friday, February 6th. The lodge 



coa« 



the closing of Tiis purchase of the * * the coaI until recently, amd 



farm of Walter Renaker near 
Verona, and will move thereabout 
March 1st. 

Chas. S. Boles of Richwood, re- 
turned home last week from a visit 
to Philadelphia and Now York. He 
purchased a home near Philadel- 
phia and will move there with 
his family about March 1st. 

Harry C. Records of Sparta, 
spent Sunday here visiting his 
grandmother Mrs. Jane Johnson. 
He is the cashier of the Sparta 
Deposit Bank and has a quarter 
of a million dollars on deposits. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Smith and 
sons Wesley and Gordon of De- 
troit, Michigan, were visitors here 
last Friday enroute to Florida, 
making their journey in their 
Franklin car, stopping enroute at 
various points of interest. 

J. W. Skinner of Georgetown, 
and J. £. Eales of Cynthiama, were 
here last week and Mr. Skinner 
bought through the Powers Real- 
ty Company the farm of William 
Gilpin near Walton at $85.00 per 
acre. The farm contains nearly 
100 acres. 

Jno. L. Vest spent Monday at 
Warsaw attending county court 
of Gallatin county in relation to 
the appointment of the Equitable 
Bank and Trust Co. as guardian of 
Miss Garvey of Glencoe, and as 
attorney of the estate of Thompr 
son Craig, deceased. / 

Rev. Eversole of Covington, the 
Presiding Eider of the Methodist 
church who was to have held ser- 
vices here Sunday was unable to 
attend on account of illness. Mrs. 
Eloise Reed of Erlanger attend- 
ed the services and rendered some 
beautiful selections on the violin 
in an artistic manner. 

Married.— Geo. Sebree and Miss 



dition and the meeting can not be 
cared for like the members would 
like. 

Married.— Samuel B. Sleet, of 
Beaver Lick, and Miss Jane Hance 
of Walton, were united in the 
bonds of holy wedlock at Cincin- 
nati Saturday in the presence of 
a few friends. The groom is a son 
of John H. Sleet and on* of the 
best young men in Boone county 
His bride is a daughter of Mr 
and Mrs. A. R. Hance and a most 
lovable and charming young lady 
They will make their home on 
his beautiful farm near Beaver 
Lick. 

The raising of bright tobacco 
as indicated in these columns last 
week is meeting with popular fa- 
vor among the tobacco growers, 
and the improvement in the qual- 
ity, will increase the general self- 
ing average in the local markets 
next year, as the low average in 
this market has been produced by 
the offerings of so much dark, 
heavy tobacco that can be used 
for chewing purposes aione, and 
the demand is chiefly for bright 
smoking tobaccos. 

Undertaker C. Scott Chambers 
was called Thursday to Grange 
Hall to take charge of the re- 
mains of Thomas Stephens who 
died from pneumonia, aged seven- 
ty-four years. The funeral took 
place at Big Bone Baptist church 
Thursday. Mr. Chambers was also 
called to take charge of the 
funeral of Mis. J. W. Berkshire at 
Petersburg, who diod from old age, 
the funeral taking place Tuesday. 
She was a widow of the late 
Senator John W. Berkshire. 

Winston C. Brown of Crittenden, 
who has been in the coaf business 
at Bracht and Walton, mysterious 
iy disappeared last Friday, and his 
absence- from home has given his 
family and friends considerable 
worry. Mr. Brown "was last seen 
in Covington Friday afternoon. It 
is believed that worry over fiana- 
cial matters has caused him to go 
to other parts pending his -temp- 
orary • embarrassment, tho there 
was no occasion for it, as his 
obligations were not so very ex- 
tensive. He had ordered a large 
amount of coal early last fall 
and had arranged for a big trade, 
but was unable to get deliveries 



Beatrice Saylier, both of Dry 

Ridge, were united in marriage al 

the residence of the officiating er b y March 1st, so, all of the, 

minister Rev. R. F. DeMoisey at growers should remember this and 



the trade was then supplied, and 
the obligations for tho large 
amount of coal was what caused 
him to desert his business. 

Saturday evening, at 6:30 Miss, 
Helen DeMoisey and James L. Kir- 
by of Covington, were united in 
the bonds of holy wedlock at the 
residence of her uncle Rev. R. F. 
DeMoisey who performed the cere 
mony. Miss Mary J. Huston, a 
cousin of the bride, Acted as 
bride's maid and Clayton Roberts 
as the best man. Miss Lufa Ed- 
wards, another cousin of the 
bride, presided at the piano and 
played the wedding march. Oth- 
ers present were Mrs. E. P. De- 
Moisey, mother of the bride, Miss 
Alice Carpenter, of Richwood, 
Wilford Rice and Miss Grace Dud- 

feon and AJolphus Edwards, Jr. 
ollowing the ceremony the wed- 
ding party were escorted to the 
dining room where a splendid din 
ner was served. The young couple 
remained as guests of their uncle 
until Sunday evening when they 
left for Covington where they will 
make their home. 

The Loose Leaf tobacco markets 
at Walton continue to hold up in 
fine shape though there is a fall- 
ing off in prices on the common 
classes of tobacco, but the fancy 
qualities are holding up to the 
general average. The Walton loose 
leaf had 130,000 pounds on sale 
Wednesday and about the same 
amount on Saturday, and the Far- 
mers loose leaf Warehouse had 
about all it could handle. On the 
market at the Walton warehouse 
Wednesday, Jesse Delahunty sold 
2,630 lbs., at an average of $67.70. 
Several small crops sold as high 
as $108.00 per cwt., the floors of 
both warehouses will be filled 
for the sales this week to their 
utmost capacity. It is expected 
the market will practically be ov- 



DeMoisey 
Walton Jan. 14th, ait 1:30 p. m., 
and left for Carrollton that af- 
ternoon to visit friends. They will 
make their h6me at Dry Ridge. 

Rev. Jas. G. Lawson of St. Louis, 
preached at the Walton Christian 
church several nights last week 
and filled the pulpit Sunday, de- 
livering some very impressive 
sermons The church would do well 
to secure him as its pastor, and 
in all probability he will be em- 
ployed to till tho present va- 
cancy. 

Died.-ybseph Colston aged 65 
years, at his home on High street 
last Wednesday from pneumonia. 
The funeral took place Friday 
and was conducted by Rev. W. H. 
Whittaker at Goshen where the 
remains were interred. He leaves 
a wife and several grown children. 
C. Scott Chambers had charge of 
the funeral. 

Leslie C. Colby, of Covington, 
was here last week in the inter- 
est of the Booth Memorial Hos- 
pital, soliciting funds to help it 
do greater and better service, and 
the present source of support be- 
ing inadequate to pioptlfy care 
for the institution. Mr. Colby re- 
ceived a very liberal donation 
from our citizens, which was 
gratefully appreciated. 

W. E. Brown, who officiates as 



get their tobacco on sale by 
that time. About two million lbs., 
of tobacco have been sold at Wal- 
ton this season at am average of 
about $34.00 per cwt. 

Ready for Business. 

The Hebron Theater advertises 
to open to the public on the 
night of the 28th inst., with two 
excellent reels. See advertisement 
in another column. The Amuse- 
ment Co. has lost no time iln the 
construction of its building and 
equipping It for business. 'Rah 
for Hebron. 



Unusual Value -In Tires 
for Small Cars 



^* 






\ 



Not only is characteristic Goodyear merit 
conspicuous in Goodyear Tires for small cars 
but ordinarily the first cost is found to be 
not greater than that of other tires; often it 
is actually less. 

The combination of unusual value in first 
cost and very low final cost, of course, is a 
result of Goodyear experience, expertness 
and care employed as insistently in the 
making of 30x3* 9 30x^y^ and 31x4-inch tires 
as it is in the construction of the famous 
Goodyear Cord Tires used on the highest* 
priced automobiles. 

For this reason more cars using -these small 
sizes were factory- equipped last year with 
Goodyear Tires than with any other kind. 

Get this unusual tire value to enjoy on your 
Ford, Chevrolet, Dort, Maxwell, oi other 
small, car, at the nearest Goodyear Service 
Station. Get these tires and Goodyear Heavy 
Tourist Tubes at this station. 



a 



-<s 



V 



30 x 3 J A Goodyear Double-Cure * "> f\nc> 
Fabric? Ail-Weather Tread....... *ZU— 

30x3% Goodyear Single-Cure 4i n /;c 
Fabrfc,Aiiti.SlddTrtai_™__ *! / — 



Goodyear Heavy Tourist Tubes axe thick, strong tubes that 
reinforce casings properly. Why risk a good casing with a 
cheap tube 1 Goodyear Heavy Tourist Tubes cost little more 
than tubes of less merit. 30x3% size in tvater- 
proafbag 



$390 




*Jl 





This is the car of hogs bred, fatted and exhibited by Gus Myers, 
Elwood, Indiana, which won grand championship over all ages, 
breeds and weights at the Chicago International, 1919. They 
were purchased by Armour & Co. for $20.50 per hundred, or 
$6.10 above the top of the market in the yard, which was $1.50 
above the top realized for anyother show hogs. 

HUBERT RYLE & SON, Grant, Ky., R D. l."~* 



PRIVATE SALE 

of Furniture consisting of 

1 living room Suite of Davinette 
Chair, Booker and Library Table 
in Walnut, upholstered in genuine 
brown leather. New 

1 Dining Table and Chairs in Jaco- 
bean finis tied Oak. New. 

1 Royal Milton Bug 9x12. New. 
1 Pressed Milton Bug 9x12. New. 
10 yards Linoleum. New. Never 

been used. 
1 Bedroom Suite. Oak. 

Come and see them. 

J. F. CASON, 
Lexington Pike, Elsmere, opposite 
Mrs. Cleek's. < 

F0R' RENT. 

I will rent my farm to a good hon- 
est man for $360 cash, allow $50 for 
fencing or anyother necessary im- 
provements. Write me if you mean 
business 

MBS. J. A. BOGEBS, 
o lmch Brookville, Mo 



\ 



• TAKE THK HOMtt P AP1K I ♦ 

+^.4.+++-;+<.+<.+4.+;!-++++>'r+++-5-*+ 



L. S. Beemon is feasting on the 
meat of a fine 'possum he cap- 
tured in his hen house a few 
nights since. The 'possum got 
away with a few fat hens before 
it was captured. 

Walter Huey has been in hard 
luck with his father's truck the 
past week. He has run off the road 
three limes but fortunately the 
damage resulting was slight. 

It looks like enough tobacco 
for two cions has been trucked 
through Burlington since the be- 
ginning of the new year. 



the auctioneer at the Loose Lea , M Ch „ kkf ^ „, d 

markets at Glencoe Sanders an<! Ml . Hi . kU , ,,„„ not u, boe ^ y ln " h „ 

Caropbellsburg, spent Sunday here bh( f , *™ 

with his family who returned ] _ J 

home from Homo Cave, Hart coun 

ty, last week. Mr. Brown reports 

a good tobacco market at all 



these points on good tobacco l>ut 
says the prices on tho lowgradeit 
of tobacco show 4 decline. 

Judge Thou F Curfey. the Keep- 
er of neoord* and Soul of Walton 
Lodge KoJghU or Pythian, has re- 
ceived S latter from the Mraiid 
Chancellor John J. n>>w.» of Car- 
rollton, aoeuundng that * U*- 
dict Heating of the Knight* of 



is. (' Oainei bought 
line sheep at I he sale 

LasMng. 



four very 
of C. W. 



Colonel Ciisilr is able to do 
xiiii. Iinhi work in his shop 

Judge (iuines is now the owim-i 
<>i u 1,1- w Dodgrt car 



Falmouth Implement i Furniture Co. 

S P EC IAL! 

Come to Falmouth, Ky ., and Save the Difference ! 

Just received a car of Brown Wagons and a car of Birdsell 

Wagons. This shipment was bought some time 

ago ahead of the advance in prices. 

Brown Wagon, 3 inch skein, 2 in. x 5-8^in. tire $140.00 

Brown Wagon, 2}i in. skein, VA in. x 5-8 in. tire $130.00, 

Birdsell Wagon, three weights in V/t, and 3* in. skein, 

Price $140.00, $145.00 and $15000 

* Also a variety of John Deere Farm Machinery. 

Falmouth Furniture & Implement Company, 



Falmouth, Kentucky. 




*■ - 




A ligbt mow followed 
>y morning 



a »lo«*i 



Subscribe for the Recorder. 



SATISFACTION 

It is worth a great deal to you to have a feeling 
of perfect satisfaction about the manner in which 
your financial business is handled' 

Let us take care of 'your business and you be 
the judge as to whether or not it is properly 
handled. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

« Burlington, Ky. 

Capital $30,000. 
Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) $50,000 

Wo have, a few tuore Farmer* Account Book! 
for distribution imn.iiK <>ur patron*. 
CALL FOH ONK, N 



_rj j i. 



**»pont' fc»a4l »o Rand AirTHss Adas In This Issauen' 



r 



mm 



as. 



frOONB COUNTY RBOORDBR 



- -TBSHSDAY JAN. J2, *»I*. 



A 



1 



£ta<s<sT happenings. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

R«t. O. C. Peyton, D. D., Psaja/- * 

Preach Ing every Sunday morning 

and evening. 
Bible School every Sunday at 10 a. 

m.— Sam Allen, Superintendent. 
•WA. cordial invitation it extended 
to all on r services. 

— - ■* M I ' ■ ■ 

Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

Rev. Gko. A. Rovbr, Pastor. 
SUNDAY, JANUARY 26th, 1W0. 

Hopeful 10:80 a. m.— Divljw seri- 
yice. j 

Hebron— 2 p. m. Divine service. 

Sermon by the Pastor at both serv- 
ices. 

All cordially invited to these serv- 
ices. 

These services will be the last un- 
til after the vacation during the 
month of February. 

The next service will be the First 
Sunday in March. 

NOTICE 1 .— The examination for 
Common School Diplomas will be 
held at tl>« Court House in Burling- 
ton, January 30 and 31. 



8 



/ 



Colonel Crialer made his first 
appearance up In town last Satur- 
day following an attack of the 
shingles. 

Mrs. Dudley Blyth was the guest 
of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
M". Botts, of Petersburg, a few' 
days last week. 



Youell &. Jones sold the Riggs 

'farm of 85 acres in Pt. Pletasant 

neighborhood, one day last week 

to C. H. Beck. Consideration not 

known. 

Ephriam Tanner, who bad a 
sale a few days ago has moved 
to the home of bis aon-^n-taw 
Thomas Dinn, between Burlington 
and BulUttsville. 




At Hebron Hall, 



Friday, January 30, 1920 

GOOD MUSIC 

Coronet, Violin, Claronet, Traps 
Saxapbone. 



Come One, Come All, Young and Old. 

Waltz, Two-Step, Quadrille 

^31 be the go. 



I 



Zimmer 



COMMITTEE 

Brown 



Wingate | 



Because of the tendency among 

id because 



farmers to hold grain an 
of the weather and bad 



roads, 



very little .grain is going *o mar- 
ket in South Dakota. 

HI L. Tanner, of Point Pleasant 
neighborhood, and Clem Kendall, 
of Florence precinct, were among 
those transacting business in Bur 
lington, last Monday. 

SALESMEN WANTED to sdjeit 
orders for lubricating oils, greas- 
es and paints. Salary or Commis- 
sion. Address THE TODD OIL & 
PAtNT CO., Cleveland, Ohio. 



Judge Oaines was not held in 
Owenton as long as he expected 
and returned home last Sunday. 
Instead of two weeks he^ complet- 
ed the work of the special term 
in one. 

Having recovered from his, se- 
vere spell of illness Denzel Car- 
penter, son of Win. Carpenter, of 
Locust Grove neighborhood, re- 
turned to school in Georgetown 
(last Monday. 

R. J. Akin, from over on Double 
Lick, Wm. Carpenter, of Locust 
Grove neighborhood, Owen Ross, 
of Hopeful neighborhood, and J. 
Waite Cross, of near town, were 
callers at this office last Mon- 
day. ' 

Warren Lasslng had a very baa 
<iay for his sale last Friday, 
but a good sized crowd was in 
attendance and every thing sola 
brought good prices. He had high 
classed stock and there was a 
demand for the animals 



DIRECT DEAUNG PAYS BEST. 

When cream u ready to call, the hard work has boon dose and you ihould 
not permit any oataidor to make an extra profit off your efforts. 
You can ship your cream DIRECT to the Tri-State and tavo from 3 to 
5 eta. per lb. of butter'fat. It i* ju»t a* easy to deliver the Cream to a rail- 
road station as to a buying station. The Tri-State pay* the freight and 
guarantee* your cream againit Iom in transit. 

Mr*. Tho*. Daulton, Peebles. O., write* on Nov. 25, 1919- "I hare chipped 
cream to the Tri-State Butter Co. for throe years and have boon satisfied . 
I have sold cream to cream stations in order to return the empty Can with 
me, a* I live 9 mile* from the railroad and always lo*t from $1 .50 to $2.00 
on every can of cream sold to agent*." 




We Pay the 
Freight and 

per pound for butter fat 

-Week Jan. 10th to 25th, inclusive. 



The Tri-State Butter Co 



70c 



CASH CAPITAL $250,000.00. CINCINNATI, O. 

If you need cans, write for Free Trial Cans. 
35,000 cream producers find it moat profitable to chip direct. 



IW* 




w+++ .h.4h~i^+*4.4hhh-4hh.4-h. I <gI*j SS jfi € -.j CMuartisements 



* Census Enumerator Garnett 
Huey, came in last Monday to get 
the Recorder's list and stated 
that he had only two more lists 
to take when his work would be 
completed, and these parties were 
in sight He has made quick work 
of his territory. 

Preston West sold and delivered 
to Albert Conner, last* Thursday, 
his crop of 2,500 or 3,000 pounds 
of tobacco at 60 cents ailrouna. 
The tobacco was raised on the 
land of J. B. Pope oh the head- 
waters of Middle creek, and is a 
very fine crop . 

Mrs Fred Morris, from out on 
the East Bend road, was a caller 
last Monday to get an estimate 
as to cost of advertising an en- 
tertainment to be given by the 
local High School on February 
14th. Get ready for something 
unusually* entertaining. 

Timothy Sandford reports the 
sale of two young roosters, Mon- 
day morning for $2.89. Only a 
few years ago he says he would 
have been glad to sold them for 
15 cents a piece. Hs considers the 

Sultry business as much safer 
in the rearing of sheep. t 

A. B. Renaker & Co., sold frne 
day last week for W. L. Tipton 
hisf arm of 310 acres in theBuij 
littsvllle neighborhood, to 'R. H. 
Herrington for $29,000, possession 
' to be given March Is*.. This is, 
the farm Mr. Tipton bought of 
Mrs. Mary Ott Gaines uboutt three 
years ago for $16,000. 

Leidy k Brothers is the style of 
the new firm tha* now owtn the 
Limaburg store. They expect to 
make considerable alteration and 
improvement in the building, in- 
corporating in it s residence. Lim- 
aburg has always been a good 
point for a country store, «i»d 
♦•vsryone who has done buriitoM 
— - there has mado good 

A iM*w high mark was madt> In 
the Covington market last Thurs- 
day when a saio for $1 06 a iiqund 
was made The same day M It. 
Wilson, oi Huilittsville nsighboi 

d, sold a cfop <>f 3,65* pounds 
ol tobacco that was rslsfd on two 
acres, measured isnd, that aver- 
aged him »Mrt RT (.or IO0 pouinU 



Opening Night. 

Hebron Theatre, 

Wednesday Right, 

January 28th, 

HEBRON. KY. 

Preaents CHARLES RAY in his 
6 reel greatest hit — 

The Hired Man. 



For Sale—PRRSH MILK COWS 
AT ALL TIMES, 

CLAUD CONNER, 
LUDLOW R. D. 2, 
Near Pt. Pleasant church, Boone 
County, Ky ang. 20 



For Sale— Pure bred 2-year old 
registered Jersey bull. S. B. Ryle, 
Grant R. D. 1. 



For Sale— Brown draft mare, 8 
years old and will weigh 1500 lbs., 
well broken to work. Dr. R. H. 
Crialer, Burlington R. D. 3. ■ 



For Sale— About 25 dbuble shocks 
of fodder— all bundled. "50 cents a 
shock. John P. Duncan, Burling- 
ton, Ky. 



For Sale— Ford touring car, 1918 
model in first-class condition. For 
further particulars call on or ad- 
dress Mrs. J. A. Richmond, Grant, 
Ky. 



For Sale— 13 60-pound shoats. Al- 
so splendid Jersey cow with calf 
by her aide. E. Warren tjtz, Union, 
Ky. Farmers phone. 



for Sale— Fresh cow and calf. 
Jas. Goodridge, Burlington. 



For Sale— Two draft horses, one 
eleven years old^fe- $75, and the 
six year old for $110. Apply to 

. Pi« 



Lonnie Gaines, near Pt 
school house. 



feasant 



Also a 2 Reel-* MACK SEN- 
NETTE COMEDY." 

Come One, Come All. 

SPECIAL MUSIC 

First Show at 7 o'clock. 

Second Show at 9 o'clock. 

+++e-}-++++++++++++-{~r'H'++++* 

■——■———*>■■■— ^» 

Mrs. Fannifl Berkshire Dead. 

Mrs. Fannie E. Berkshire diea 

at her home in Petersburg on the 

17th inst. She was the widow of 

the bite John W. Berkshire ' and 

a sister of N. S. Watton,both of 

whom were prominent in politics 

in this county many years ago. 

Mrs Berkshire is survived by four 

sons and one daughter. The inter- 
ment took place in the family 

lot in Petersburg cemetery, C 

Beott Chambers, of Walton, having 

charge. 

I— ' ' ('Suicide white temporarily ln- 

BlirlingtOn People «t HOtpital. Mne,'» was the verdict rendereu 

Tuesday yy Coroner David W. 
Stephens oi.' Kenton county in the 
case oi' Charles Mohr, 59, former 
saloonkeeper whose body was dis- 
covered hanging late Monday, in 
i his home on Oarvey Ave., Elsmero. 
Mohr handged himself with a sew 
' ing machine belt, which was at- 
tached to the upper hinge on a 
door. 



Lostc-Blaek spotted hound, has 
been gone about a month. Infor- 
mation as to its wherpeboutB will 
be thankfully received by Clarence 
Mitchell, Burlington R. D. 2. 

For Sale— Nice driving mare, 15 
hands high, kind and gentle and 
will work anywhero. J. G. Ren- 
aker, Florence, Ky. 

Lost— On the road between Bur- 
lington and John Duncan's Jan. 20, 
a package containing two yards 
table oil cloth. Finder will please 
return to W. W. Craddock, Bur- 
lington R. D. 1. 



Elsmara Man Commits Suioide 



B. B. Hume was taken very sick 
on his way home from Covington, 
last Thursday evening and was 
cared for at a friends house from 
where he was taken to tho Good 
Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati, rri 
day morning, where he has been 
very ill, though better at last 
accounts His wife went <to his 
bedside Sunday, and while at tho 
hospital is having one of liw 
ankles treated lor murlUs with 
which she has suffered greatly 
the past month Dr. Duncan is bo- 
ing treated at the same ho.tpltai 
and the last word from him was 
to the effect thai he wns mot 
netting along Well 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GEEATEST STORE. 




Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



Savings Most Extraordinary 

In Our 

January 

Clearance Sale 

Women's Coats 

Formerly $f ^eaf^^-75 



Priced up 
to $59.75 



29 



EVERY COAT HAS H LUXURIOUS FUR COLLAR. Good warm coats of fashion- 
able fabrics in the very best colors and styles, at a price that 
means a saving of nearly ONE-HALF. 



January Clearance 

Sale of Yard 

Goods. 

# 
$1.75 and $2.00 Corduroy Suitings. 32 

and 36 inches wide, in the best colors in- 
cluding navy and black. A big special in 
this sale at ^ «g ^JE 

yard ."... ef I id? 

35c Outing Flannels, in pretty stripe, 
check, and dark mottled effects. Short 

lengths of the regular 35c quali- «^C #•* 

ty at yard bVV 

~^^^_ - i 

35c Dress Ginghams, beautifully colored 
plaids splendid dress Ginghams, in both light 
and dark sffects. Big special value AP^ 
in the Clearance Sale at yard ■••••• bvil 



We are Continuing 
the Removal Sale 
{ of Draperies 
and Rugs 

and if you are planning to buy new floor 
coverings, curtains, or draperies, in the next 
few months, you'll make a wonderful saving 
by making your purchase during this b.ig re- 
moval sale. Here's a sample of the savings 
you'll make: t 

9x12 Brussells Rugs 
$30.75 

Regular $45.00 seamless Brussells Rugs full 
room size 9x12 feet. Beautiful designs, rich 
colorings. Extraordinary value at $30.75. 



PUBLIC SAIL 



Infhrfnaa Its. on |i|iloml 

In several army rump*, particular 
ly In the Ml.!. II,. V\ <<•.(, K 
been ai»i"u 

g Ainrrk 
ni*) 



Tin* averug? pi'lee on tho Cov- 
ington tobtco • market Tursdity 
wss *33.9l At Aurora, $31 81. flur- 
H» &. Youell aolq » eron on th» 
Covington market at en. average 
of fin jo Low grades on iwcbmir 
hut slioui l a decided Ldaprsyve* 



We will sell at Public Sale at our residence 
known as the Wood Sullivan farm, on the 
Woolper pike, half mile from the Burlington 
and Belle view pike, on 

Tuesday, Jari'y 27, ; 20 

The following property: 

2 good Work Horses, 5 Jersey Milch Cows, 2 Shorthorn 
Cows, 2 yearling Steers, 3 yearling Heifers, 19 young Ewes, 
1 Buck, 17 shoats will weigh from 80 to 100 lbs., 1 red Sow 
will farrow in March, red Boar, lot Timothy Hay in barn, 
Set of double Buggy Harness, Buggy and Pole, dozen nice 
Geese, Cream. Separator, and 2 5-gallon Milk cans, 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on all sums ever $10.00 a credit 
six months without interest will be given, purchasers to give notes with 
approved security negotiable and payable in the Citizens Deposit Bank, 
Grant, Ky., before removing property. 



Bradford & Snelling 



Mis **•'•> Baku, of l.unaburg, 
•old w aorea « land An th«« Lim- 
it ha* »)>|**reu ahurf and Andtraun Kerry ptfce 
truuos lu Qe#-|to Prvd (lro*% (' .jieldiiatloa e*td 
I to be eomethtaf i#« #4,0© i 



Sale to begin at 12 o'olook sharp. 



Thomas Dinn, Klov.l BoUagton, 
W, 11 Kousp, M H. Rice, Oeorge 
Kwyliuh and lh II II Orlsler, 
were among the Recorder's «>u»i' 
neaa vliltnn la«l Monday 



Horn on tli«> 14th t» Roj 



and wifi\ of Weterloo 
hiHut, a girl 



u Ighbvr- 



FOR RENT. 

I-'hi in ii f ,.i iwio oorn ami tob*>oco 
land for tilling. Seed bulldluga on 

tin m 

I M HI K\lu.\ t nU. il, K\ 



« UK ,\ rHMMilMR i 



FOR SALE 

Si\ iiuiiii Iiuiimh anil mil nil' 

gi«*nnU on Diatw kliniiwa> tun 
minute* «!♦!* »*itt»i I iaa> 

a«'i. .V|»|>ly to t'fia*. N Hi i ■ t » « ua, 

(■ Min.l 
Waim« m,'u\ 

• • NtAUR AT HUilg t • 






•THURSDAY JAN. 22, 1919. 



rtUONE COUNTY R&CORDKK e 



«k L •* . *• ....-It- 



I > / 




*&cf5 



TO ELIMINATE SCRUB BULLS 

Campaign Started by Wisconsin Farm- 
ers to Use Only Purebred Sires- 
Record in One County. 



OVcparcd by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 

Wisconsin dairymen and farmers, 
desirous of increasing their profits and 
adding still greater honors to their al- 
ready famous dairy *5tnl<\ have joined 
in it state-wide cntttpnigh to eliminate 
The scrub, bull and use only purebred 
sires. The re< ord made hist year in 
the Brown County Cow-Testing asso- 
ciation typifies the merits of purebred 
bulls and illustrates why farmers and 




A Sire of Good Quality. 

dairymen wtti not tolerate the scrob. 
In this association 12 cows qualified 
for the register of production. AH of 
these cows were daughters of pure- 
bred sires, six of them being daughters 
of one sire. The five best herds In the 
association are beaded by purebred 
sires, while the five poorest herds are 
all headed by grade or scrub sires. 
The herds of those farmers who used 
purebred sires averaged 85 pounds 
more fat a cow than those using grades 
or scrubs. Last year eight of the mem- 
bers purchased purebred sires of 
known breeding fcoj replace their 
scrubs. 



KEEP DAIRY COWS ON FARM 



For Farmer Who Hao Good Market 

for Products Dairying Is Most 

Profitable Business. 

Keeping dairy cows will help the 
average farmer to overcome three 
main drawbacks to the one-crop sys- 
tem of farming: A cash income but 
once a year, a depleted soil, and un- 
equal distribution [of labor, according 
to C. H. Staples, jilniry specialist, ex- 
tension divislon.i Louisiana State 
university. I • 

"Pot 1 the farmer- who does not have 
a ready" and accessible market for 
dairy products, a few dairy cows will 
provide the cheapest and beVt of hu- 
man food for the family." says Mr. 
Staples. "The cows will consume 
much of the rough feeds that usually 
go to waste and the expense of keep- 
ing them is almost negligible. 

"For the farmer who has a good 
market for dairy products dairying Is 
a most profitable business, is always 
a safe and sound line of farming, is 
least affected by sudden changes of 
vstather and seasons, gives a steady 
cash income, builds up the soil, and 
provides employment for labor at all 
seasons." 



MAKE BETTER FARM BUTTER 



Trouble Incident to Home Production 
May Be Decreased by Using Mors 
< Careful Methods. 

The adoption of more careful meth- 
ods of handling milk and cream and 
Improved practices In the making of 
farm butter will reduce rather than 
increase the trouble incident to home 
production of this food, say dairy spe- 
cialists, and will result In a superior 
product which can be sold more easily 
and for a better price than the aver- 
age farm butter. 



DAIRY HERD IS FOUNDATION 



Not Hard to Raise Calves, Pigs and 

Lambs if Skimmed Milk la 

Easily Available. 

* ' Thr -"Tiry he«-Vs th^1ounda*'^-4or 

the stock farmer or even for the gen 
eral farmer who keeps several kinds 
cjf stock. With skimmed milk It la 
easy to raise calves, pigs and lambs, 
but without it one may And a substi- 
tute rather expensive and unsatisfac- 
tory. Keep the dairy cows and then 
these others may be added. 



FEED DAIRY COWS ROUGHAGE 



Outline Given of Two Grain Ratloni 

to Be Fad With Clover or 

Alfalfa Hay. 

When the roughage fur dairy eowi 
fa clover or alfalfa hay, the grain ra 
florin may be 2IMI pOQOdl eoru ami e«il> 
meal, 100 pounds ground oatf and KN 
pounds gluten re<<i ; <>r 2M1 poundi 
jmrn-MOd-eoti meal, 100 pounds wheal 
bran and 100 puuuda gluten feed. 



C a m l d sratiBo of Package. 
Tito package "i wiiii-h butter Is 
marketed eauisuds taivfal miuldure- 




PURPOSE DF A SMALL FLOCK 



It Is Primarily for Eggs and Therefore 

Fowls Should Be Feet With This 

End in View. 



(Prepared by the Tnited States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 

The actual purpose of keeping a 
small flock of fowls is primarily for 
egg production. Consequently they 
should be fed with this end in view. 
Practically every housewife has a 
quantity of table scraps, vegetable 
peelings and "leftovers" that can be 
utilized by feeding to hens. Supple- 
mentary to such feed, however, a grain 
and dry inash should be provided in 
order to produce the best results. By 




Purebrod Fowls of General-Purpose 
Type Are Best Adapted for Back- 
Yard Flocks. 

supplying the fowls with all available 
table scraps it will usually cost from 
50 to- 75 cents a year per fowl for 
grain ami other feeds. A good egg 
laying ration should consist of the 
following: Three parts corn meal and 
oq£ part beet' scrap mixed together 
and fed in a dry-mash hopper to which 
the fowls will have access at all times. 
In addition to this a scratch ration 
consisting of equal parts cracked corn 
and oats should he ted twice daily. 
When no table scraps are available it 
will take about one quart of scratch 
grain fialiy for twelve to fourteen 
fowls. Hf.wever. this can be reduced 
when table scraps are fed and a cer- 
tain amount of natural green feed, 
such as jjrass. is a vn liable. 

In providing the' fowls with a suit- 
able house it should be remembered 
that the essentials of such a building 
are fresh air, dryness, sunlight' and 
sufficient space so that the fowls will 
not be crowded. Usually each fowl 
should be allowed four square feet of 
lloor space. If- available, scrap lum- 
ber from dry-goods boxes,- etc., can be 
utilized to construct such a house. The 
cost will be considerably less than 
When lumber Is pWchnsed. If suffi- 
cient lumber is not available for the 
entire house a rough framework well 
covered with ordinary roofing or tar 
paper will answer the immediate 
needs. 

When the heavier fowls (Plymouth 
Roeks. Wynndottes, Rhode Island 
Reds, etc.) are kept all females sluuild 
he disposed of at the end of their sec- 
ond year. Inasmuch as in most cases 
they will cease to be profitable at the 
end of .that time. The lighter breeds 
(Leghorns, etc.). however, can be prof- 
itably kept as long us three years. By 
disposing of the hens in this way a 
part of the flock must be renewed each 
year. Consequently, considering thnt 
the percentage of cockerels nnd pnllets 
is usually about the same, and thnt. 
a certain percentage will die before 
reaching maturity. It is customary to 
hatch more chicks each year than 
there are hens in the flock. 




Overfeeding kills more chicks than 

uiiderf ceding. 

• » • 

Little and often is a good feeding 

rule for newly hatched chicks. 

* * • 

Eggs for Incubator hatching should 
be fresh, the fresher the belter. 

♦ * * 

TOft* Is uieTime of .it>ur wftrn i»oui- 
try quarters need to be made safe from 
rats. # 

* * • 

Ducklings should be ready for the 
gic.n duck market nt from ten to 

fourteen weeks of age. 

• • • 

A good, well-regulated Incubator will 
hatch eggs wilh far more eerHilnty nnd 
do it inure cheaply than can he done 
with liens. 

• ♦ • 

Mm li <>| (lie I rouble ofliyi found In 
brooding • i> ■ i. I i due alone to feed- 
i In . .< ,-vs during the 
Bl ! li « day.'i. 

*. • • 

ft rut UN mi ( liliitcuN legs are en used 
■ Hi.- tan DeSj he con 
1 1 oil* I of by the una Of 

I oil. 



CHANDLER SIX 

Famous For Its Marvelous Motor 




Thousands Choose The 
Chandler Dispatch 

MANY admirers of the Chandler Six choose the 
Chandler Dispatch. For two years this model 
has outsold all other cars of the so-called sport type. 
Its popularity is one of the high spots in motordom. 

The new series Dispatch is a snappy, handsome 
car, seating four adults in perfect comfort. It is of 
most beautiful design and finish; mounted on the 
standard Chandler Chassis, famous for its mechanical 
excellence. 

You are asked to pay much more for cars which 
might perhaps be compared with the Chandler. And 
cheap cars sell for but little less. 

SIX SPLENDID BOD\ TYPES 

Seven-Passenger Touting Car, $1895 . Four-Passenger Roadster, S189S 

Four- Passenger Dispatch Car, SI 97 5 
Seven- Passenger Sedan, S289S Four-Passenger Coupe, S279S Limousine, S339S 

(All prices f. o.*6. Cleveland) 

S. O. SCHANKER 

Erlanger, Ky. 

CHANDLER MOTOR CAR COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO 



. 





KITCHEN 





Tlila world is a pretty good sort *f a 
world 
Taking It all together; 
In spite of the grief and sorrow w» 
meet; 
In apito of the srloomy weather. 
There are friends to love and hope* ts> 
cheer. 

And plenty of compensation 

For uvwy ache, far (tu.se who mate* 
Tho be«t of the situation. 



CAKES AND FROSTINGS. 




A tender, line grained, well-baked 
nnd goodly eake Is a work of ait. 

Old Fashioned Pound 
Cake. — Cream one cup- 
ful of butler and add 
gradually one and two- 
fhirds cupful* of granu- 
lated sugar, heating con- 
stantly ; then add live 
eggs, one -at a time — 
beating vigorously be- 
tween the addition of 
m ^^ m ^^ m each. When the mixture 
Is creamy fold In two cupfuls of pas- 
try flour sifted once. Hake in a slow 
over for one hour. 

Six Months' Cake.- Mix one-half cup 
of butter and laid until creamy, 
tbeu add one cup of sugar gradually, 
beating constantly, two eggs well bent- 
en and one-hulf cupful of molasses. 
Mix and sift two and one half cupfuls 
of flour, one teaspoon fill of cream of 
tartar, one-half teaspoonfjil of soda, 
one teaspoonfiil of cinnamon, one- 
fourth tenspoonfuf of cloves, and the 
same of mace. Add alternately with 
one-half cup of milk to ihe ft-- jkh» 
rureahfl beat vigorously; then add 
one cupful of rautftu seeded and cut 
in small pieces und dredged with two 
tublespoonfuls of Hour. Turn iulo two 
bread pans and hake in a moderate 
oven forty-five minutes. 

White Fruit Cake.— Cream two- 
thirds of a cup of batter until creamy 
und add gradually, beating constantly, 
Hcveu-eiKhtlis of a cupful of pnslry 
flour sifted with one-fourth nf u tea* 
spoonful of soda, t It t -is add one half 
talilcsponnftll of lemon Juice. Iteat llie 

whites of six etna until siirr, using an 
cku whip, ndd gi'aduuliy ana mm) wmi 

fOUrtil CUpfUlS of powdered MUgttt. 

Combine mixtures and wbeu well 

lileinled add Iwu lliinls of a cilpllll of 
CUUdied .hum-, and tniclliiul .,f , k 
cupful of Ida lulled mid shredded nl 
tuutida, eo. half cup of citron .u-i uuu 
(cH.peei,. Imoiiii tig tract Turn 

iulo [''in iiihI i ii uiudiji-. 



Satisfactory Glasses 

Our glasses* are comfortable when 
fitted, and we keep them so for you 
free of charge. Any time they get 
bent, or out of shape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 

Phone South 1746 
T|T> "KT tti "D"I?XTXr W,TH "otch. j«w«i«r. 

J-JXi. JM. Jf . JT HiVi IS ,613 Madison Ave. - Covington. Ky 






LUTE BRADFORD 

^AUCTIONEER- 

Is well posted on prices, has a wide acquaintance and 
knows all the good buyers. 

Live Stock Sales a Specialty 

Can Give all the Reference You Want. 
Farmers Phone. TERMS REASONABLE. 

FLORENCE, KY., R. D. 

•4 




Tobacco Growers 

Before Purchasing 
Your 

TOBACCO COTTON 

Come In and See 
Our Line 

The LUHN & STEVIE Co. 



( Incorporated) 



. The Store That Save* You Money. 

28-30 Pike St. Covington, Ky. 



itii 1 



f. 1.. Kasssbui & In, 

SMITE 4 HiRBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

fl Large Stock on Display J 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

lia Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 




: 



Sales and Service 



e 

: 

e 
e 
e 

j 

19 E. Seventh St, 

• COVINGTON, KY. • 

CLYDE BARLOW, 

S General Manager. « 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••a 






_ SsSk 

jttuA AWwtrt. Take Your County Paper, $1.60. 



D. E. Castleman, /. 
A TTOBJYE Y AT LAW, 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, j ^ 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 

WANTED 1 

Boone County farms to sell. Ad- 
dress W. E. VEST, 
First Nat. Bank Building;, 

Covikoton, Ky 

JAMES L. ADAMS . 
DENTIST 

Cohen Building 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 

While flak Stock Farm 




now has on hand April farrowed pigs 
both sexes; will be ready for ship- 
ment when 8 to 10 weeks old. These 
are the Big Bone and smooth type, 
the kind that makes the show hog. 
Prices Reasonable — Pedigrees Free. 
, FRANK HAMMOND. 

«. D. 1, Florence, Ky. 

Con. Phone 229. ma8tf 



COULD HARDLY = 
STANDALONE 

Terrible Suffering From Headache, 
Sideache, Backache, and Weak- 
ness, Relieved by Cardui, 
Says This Texas Lady. 

Gonzales, Tex. — Mrs. Minnie Phil- 
pot, of this place, writes: "Five yean 
ago I was taken with a pain In my 
left side. It was right under my 
left rib. It would commence with an 
aching and extend up into my left 
shoulder and on down into my back. 
By that time the pain would be so 
severe I would have to take to bed, 
and suffered usually about three days 
. . .1 Buffered this way for three years, 
and got fo be a mere skeleton and was 
so weak I could hardly stand alone 
Was not able to go anywhere and had 
to let my house work go... I suffered 
awful with a pain in my back- and I 
had the headache all the time. I Just 
was unable to do a thing. My lite 
was a misery, my stomach got In an" 
awful condition, caused from taking 
so much medicine. I suffered so much 
pain. I had just about given up all 
hopes of our getting anything to help 
me. 

One day a Birthday Almanac was 
thrown in my yard. After reading 
Its testimonials I decided to try Car- 
dui, and am so thankful tha<i I did, 
for I began to improvu when on the 
second bottle... I am now a well 
woman and feeling fino and the cure 
has been permanent for it has beea 
two years since my awful bad health. 
I will always praise and recommend 
Cardui." Try Cardui today. B 78 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do Jay cAdver- 
tising. 



e e 

e IMPORTANT NOTICE. ♦ 

e Watch the date following ♦ 

e your name on the margin ♦ 

# of your paper and If It Is ♦ 
e not correct please notify ♦ 

# this offlct* at once. If your ♦ 
e |p*l>or has bfien itlncnnUnu- ♦ 
#■ ed by mistake before your ♦ 

# time «k|iltt'<l do Ml <!■ Ihv ♦ 

# notifying this office. All t>r- ♦ 
e rote aro cheerfully corrett- e 
*a here. ♦ 

e 

♦e**eeeee*e#*»#« ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 



* a 

'♦♦♦♦♦• JL 

•UUsiK, 



^^mm^tmm 



THURSDAY .TAN. 22, l"t9. 



BOONE -~&t u «^ i kECOSvi>£R 



"r». 5 . 



\ 



I* 



1 



POWER TO VETO PEACE. 

Defects In Treaty Making Brought 
Out By Controveisy. E&2i< 



Washington Post. 
The constitution provides a way 
to enact laws despite the veto of 
the President. But there is no way 
to make a treaty against the veto 
of the President. If there shouW 
bo In the White House a Presi- 
dent, who did not wish *o make 
peace after his treaty had been 
changed by the Senate, it might 
happen thit the United State* 
would be unable to reach a state 
of peace, except on terms laid 
down by a single individual, and 
in defiance of Congress. There 
might be a President so wedded 
tpf hi* own plan, so entangled by 
promises to foreign Governments 
Or so Jealous of the rights of 
the Senate that he would refuse 
to exchange ratifications of w 
peace treaty if the Senate haa 
made reservations in behalf of thlH 
nation. The reservations might bo 
desirable and warmly approved by 
the people, but such a President 
could say, <: I do not accept the 
action of the Senate as the will 
of the peopel, and I refuse to 
approve the Senate's work. ' He 
would be within his constitutional 
powers and coufd nnt be compell- 
ed to exchange .-atlfications of 
the treaty. 

By a two thirds vote Congress 
can repass a bill over a Presi- 
dent's veto and it becomes a law 
The same provision should be 
made in case of a treaty, after it 
has been approved by the Sen- 
ate by the required two thirds 
vote • Having reached that stage 
it should not be pigeonholed by 
the President, and he should mot 
have the power to pigeonhole it 
If he should refuse to proceed 
with exchange of ratifications, 
Congress should have power to 
make the treaty effective by a 
two thirds vote, as in case of a 
vetoed MIL A treaty i» « l*w. 
bo far as it affects 'American cit 
icons it is nothing butt a law. 
Coneress can abrogate a treaty 
by passing a law, with or with- 
out the President's consent, and 
this has been done several time^ 
If a treaty and a law are in eon 
fUctthe^ Supreme Court takes the 
last expression as the law wheth 
er it be the treaty or a simple 
act of Congress. 

It is conceivable that a Presi- 
dent of the United States might 
be elected who would m»««* a h £ 
power to pigoorihole ,, a peace 
treaty, and thus keep the nation 
in a state of war. A treaty tf» a 
'contract between nations, and us- 
ually a peace treaty is a com- 
plicated bargain, the^making of 
which required confidential - ex- 
changes between the parties, often 
leading to .the making of secret 
pledges which must be kept from 
tlie knowledge of the people In 
auch a case tl>e completed drart 
is apt to conceil as much as it 
reveals. It is also apt to be 
obscure, ambiguous, or . even 
purposely misleading on impor- 
tant matters which have been dis- 
posed of secretly, or which are to 
be handled privately by the Gov- 
ernments, in a manner which 
would arouse antagonism, or even 
war, if known to the people. In 
that case the Senate woufd de- 
mand information, and would not 
obtain it. or it would learn some 
thing indirectly which would 
cause it to malic amendments or 
reservations, for the sake of na- 
tional security 

The present controversy over 
the treaty of Versailles has been 
valuable in bringing out the de- 
fect in the .treaty-making power 
which is herein described. The 
truth is that the treaty-imaking 
power is not equally divided be- 
tween the President and the Sen- 
ate, since the President haB an ab- 
solute veto. This lacuna should not 
be permitted to exist, for the rea- 
son that peace is usually reached 
by means of treaties, and it is 
unwise to leave to one man the 
power to continue a state of war 
against the will of the people and 
Congress. 

Congress can declare war with 
or without the President's consent, 
but it cannot make peace by 
treaty without the President's eon 
sent Surely, if the constitution 
makers found it desirable to em- 
power Congress to overrule the 
President in making war it would 
aeem desirable that Congress 
should have power to overrule 
him in making peace by a treaty 
which he himself would have- sub- 
mitted. _ 



'III E 



H = 



M = 



MAXWELL 

Has Won Its Following Through 

Its Quality 



POUND for pound, the metals used in the 
Ivlaxwell chassis compare favorably with those 
in the best' cars that the world has produced, 
according to metallurgists. 

There is a deep seated reason for this quality in a 
Maxwell. 

For the fundamental purpose of the Maxwell is 
to carry the same passenger load over the same roads 
and at the same speeds as larger and more expensive 
cars. 

Trs particular mission is to carry this passenger load 
in an extremely economical way. 

Therefore the Maxwell had to be light. But to 
make it strong as well as light only the very best of 
materials could be employed. 

Hence, the quality metals. 

And it was through the quality of its metals that 
Maxwell developed its following. 

This is a following that began five years ago 
with a foundation of 5,000 and now reaches 
a mark of 100,000 in ioaoi 

300,000 Maxwells now on the highways of 
two continents are a daily endorsement of the 
merit of this great car. 



<Bsa 



Utr, milt I frr film 
Mtrt wdla $n tint 



W. L. KIRKPATRICK 

Agent for Boone County 

Burlington, Ky. 



iiiiiiiwnfflffl 



Now is the time Mr. Farmer for you to think 
of the seed you are going to plant this winter. 

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO PLANT? 
HOW MANY ACRES WILL YOU SOW ? g 

What kind of seed will get you the best 
results? 

THINK IT OVER. 

We are now prepared to take your order for 
any variety of winter seed. 

Fancy New Timothy, Kentucky Blue Grass, 
Orchard Grass. Red Clover, Alsike Clover, 
Alfalfa, * Yellow and White .sweet Clover, 
Fancy Recleaned Red'Top. 

It is a fact that in previous years prices 
of seeds have always jumped as the seed 
season advances, so why not play wise — 

GET YOURS NOW. 

You'll get the best ot "seed from us, [high 
grade, high test, pure seed, and you will save 
money. 

WRITE NOW FOR PRICES. 



IliiimiiimitiiHiiil 



liiiniiiiiii.il' 



Northern Kentucky's! ^Ped^SeE 



ri' j »j.'. !JP 



(9c*f/yrfa 



United States Wheat Directors License No. 01083S-Y 



Its A Wise 

Practical head which decides to give Husband 

• or Father, Brother or Sweetheart "A Warm 

^ Friend That Will Stick" when the cold winds 

blow. What would be more appreciated as a 

CHRISTMAS GIFT than a 

Suit or Overcoat 

WACHS has them for- — 




48,000 

Drug Stores Sell It! 

Five million people 
use it to KILL COLDS 



HI 

CASCARA 




V 




Standard cold remedy for 19 yaara 

k — rn tablet form— u(«, lura, no 

" opiate* — breaki up a told in 24 

^. hottn — relieve* grip la S dan. 

Tloney back if it talk. Tbo 

. genuine boa haa a Rod 

>P with Mr. HOl'a 

picturo. 

At All Drag Sfrr— 



Cow Testing in Dear- 
born County, Ind. 

Dearborn County Cow Testing As 
aociation will complete Its year's 
work this month. The members 
have received a wonderfuf bene- 
fit from the work. Thev have a 
complete record at tutu- rcBpec- 
,Uve heards, Th?y know without 
doubt their boarder cows and also 
the good ones. They are better 
ahle to make a wise selection of 
calves to build un the future h'.'T '. 
A large number of boarder cows 
•have (been disused of and a large 
number of pure bred animals put 
in their places They have also 
bought ceveral car loads of block 
feed and made a largo saving.— 
Lawreneebu'-g Pre»3. 

Known by Jews a Long While. 

Head the XI VI chanter of Duter- 
«ffl«my, and fOU will know what 
may ami what may not Ite eulten, 
and the swim* because it dividwttt 
the hoof, y«*l chewvth not theiiei. 
it 1h unci. '.m unto you, jr< shall 
not eat ot tlulr Mesh nor touch 
On ir (load CSrOSM 

J | MALI. 

Iowa's i »p Is « vi i It it 

in auaUt) i'oi tMouc llmi tin rn 

to I 

t 

■Ml 

.allM !•• lM 



Aurora, Jan. 17 — The Aurora 
Loose Leaf Tobacco Warehouse 
Company sold today 58,305 lbs. of 
tobacco at an average of $38,33 
per 100 pounds. Rejections were 
heavy on account of the inferior 
tobacco on sale, which grades sola 
at a low ebb. 



************** aeiosaeMO****** 

•FOR SALE. | 

1918 Ford Sedan, Heintz Springfield Electric Starter, «£ 

Willard Storage Battery, Minute Wheels with 5 new •$• 

30x3 1-2 Tires, Spot Light, Yale Lock, Speedometer •'!* 

and other extras. Splendid conditon. "0. 

Bargain at $800.00 ^ 



Men, Young Men 

i 

and Boys 

Also a large stock of Sweater Coats, Corduroy 
and Duck Coats ; also Pant9. Let us show them 
to you 



1918 Hudson Super-Six Touring Car, 5 good Tires, -^ 

plenty o£ppower and speed, in first-class condition. *fc 

Price $1,300 00 ^ 

S.'O. SCHANKER, * 



Lexington, Jan. 18.— Duiing the 
sixth week of the local tobacco 
maiket, which closed Friday, 5,661, 
650 lbs. of tobacco wan sold for 
an average of S53.00 per 100 lbs. 
This average is sfll.05 per 100 lbs. 
better than the average for the 
preceding week and $4.42 per 10') 
bett$er than the average of the 
first week of sales following- the 
holidays. The market is tiu< 
strongest in hiHtory on good and 
Idgh claaa offerings, but tip* and 
mean tobacco are tlowty Heitling 
to lower levels 



KY. » 



Selmar Wachs 

605 Madison Ave, Covington, Ky. 



Chandler and Cleveland Sixes. 

erlanger! 




L-xiuglon, Jan UP Police to l.iv 
are looking tor a white man who 
if* all </«' I •" nsvn • »l I three ne- 
groes a tOOHgatlon keg of rain 
water for whisky The negroes 
puid $1'25 for the kog of water 



Lexington, >lan If] i hi « <>> Idi 

hi out fo i the SSlO ii] 1 ll)*l 



t 
record roi the SA1C ol lo 
tobacco was broken >>n iu» I 
muton mail' ' u wlieu 

lt«lA If I i l VV H In * 

(Mfutl and O li 

ily, wtltl »■» 
mi atiutMf* «>t Mllal !>•'• I "i The 
Itigh ImitKi I 



Boone County Boy 

IS NOW LOCATED AT 

9th 6- Bankliek St. Covington, Ky. 

Handling Fresh and Cured Meats, 
Fish and Game- 
Will buy anything the farmer has to sell. 
Special price on flour, long as it lasts: 

Best Winter Wheat Flour on the market, guaran- 
teed 196 lbs. wood, $13.75 ; 24 ! lb. sack, $1.60. 
or $12 80 per barrel. 

C ill and see mm gt1 acquainted. 

A. L. LANCASTER. 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 
Consolidated Phone 35. Farmers Phone. 




ARE YOU A HEADER OF THE KFXORDER? 



Philip Taliaferro 

Undertaker 1 Embalmer 

« Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 

ERLANGER, KY. 

D . I Day: Erl |7 

Phones | N ^ ht Lfl 52 . Y 

wmmmmLmtmLwm 



tttst Our A^vcrmmiciils find Profll Ov TllCsm* 



■■»- 



TBURSDAY JAN. 22, 1919. 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



h 



Bfinuir CO. RECORDER 

m 
I'l'BMHHKI) KVKRY TMUnsHAY 

W. L. RIDDKLL. Publisher. 



■?r<' net nt tin Pns»< fflrf in Purling 
ju, Ky.. an Second-class Mail 



WOMAN AND BABE 
ABANBONEB IN 
STOLEN AUTO. 



Following a wild ride of six 
miles through the hills of (two 
counties, a stolen automobile oc- 
cupied by two men, two women 
and a six months' old baby, was 
found abandoned with one of the 
women and the baby. The firing 
of a bullet which imbedded itself 
in the tonneau of the machine, 
caused the other occupants of the 
car to iie& to -the hills. About > 
7:30 p. m., Sunday O. A. Seifetr, 
Covington garage owner, reported 
to the pobce thai his five pas- 
senger automobile had been stol- 
en from in front of his residence 
at 2209 Scott street. A short time 
later a machine stopped at n 
garage owned by George Wayman, 
Walton, to get gasoline. Wayman 
Teeognized the machine as the. 
property of Seiler. He tried to 
atop the machine, by jumping <m$o 
the running board, but the driver, 
putting on more speed god away, 
wayman then started in pursuit. 
He chased the stolen car for six 
miles to Crittenden. Near Critten- 
den Wayman fired at the fleeing 
car. When questioned by Detec- 
tives Higgins and Goodaon, the 
woman said that she was the moth 
er of the baby and that she did 
not know the machine was stolen. 
She told the officers that the two 
men and the woman stopped at 
her house and asked her to wit- 
ness a wedding which was to 
have taken place at Lexington. 
She said that it was her belief 
that they were to go to Lexing- 
ton on a train. Detective Higgins 
found a revolver in a field near 
the machine. The woman gave the 
police the names of others she 
said were in the auto. The wo- 
man with the baby was allowed 
to return to her home in Coving- 
ton. The machine was returned 
to Covington. — Monday's Times- 
Star. 

SOLD $10,000 WORTH 
OF CREAM TO THE 
TRISTATE BUTTER CO 

Harrison, Ohio, Man Says He Never 
Received a Cream Check But That 
He Felt He Had Been Given Right 
Weight and Test. 

"After 7 years' dealings we feel 
it your due to have a word of 
appreciation for your square- deal- 
ings in that time,'' writes Chas. 
Bonham, a well known and re- 
spected farmer of Harrison, Ohio. 

Mr. Bonham is well known in 
his community and takes an ac- 
tive part in all activities for the 
betterment of the agricultural in- 
terests. Bjj has a herd of 21 Jer- 
seys and he considers them best 
for cream production. 

"We sold a few cans of cream 
to the local stations to try them 
out,'' continued Mr. Bonham, "but 
always went back to The Tri 
State.'' Mr. Bonham received over 
$10,000.00 in. Tri State checks dur- 
the past 7 years and butter- 
was considerable cheaper 7 
years ago than it is today. Every 
new cream buyer that opened up 
shop, tried to buy Bonham's 
cream— he- was coaxed to give 
them each a trial, but even tho 
the station buyers did their best, 
it was useless for Mr. Bonham to j 
sell his cream to a commission 
buyer, for when one 'handles a ! 
herd of 21 cows, the hard work is! 
done before the cream is brought ! 
to town and when the cream is ! 
in town, Mr. Bonham couldn't see 
any use in taking from 3 cents 
to 5 cents per pound less for his 
cream in order to favor a cream 
buyer, especially when he knew 
his check would come along from 
The Tri State in a few days af- 
ter shipping, bringing the PULL 
price for the cream. 

The Tri State Butter Company 
only buys from the producer ar:d 
every shipment is received in 



DID YOU KNOW 

That— This is the largest country bank in Northern 
Kentucky and where your surplus funds are ab- 
solutely -safe. 

That— We pay 3 per cent interest ; also your taxes 
on deposits. 

That— We serve about 1,000 people. 

That— Our Safe— The Mosler Corliss— is the strongest 
safe made. 

That— We want you to use this bank in every way 
in which it will be a benefit to you. 

That -WHEN BETTER SERVICE IS POSSIBLE, 
THIS BANK WILL RENDER IT. 
If you are not a customer, call in and talk matters 
over with us. We know you will be a benefit to 1 
us and trust that we can be of some service to you. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky, 
Resources Over Half Million Dollars. 

W. L. B. ROUSE, President. A. B. RENAKER, Cxhier. 

EDGAR C. RILEY, Vice-Pre.. 
NELL H. MARTIN, AmI. Cashier. L. T. UTZ, A..t. Cashier. 



Public 




I will sell at public auction at my residence, 
1 mile North of Bullittsville, Ky., on 

, January 24th, 1920 

A sale for the division of Stock and Crops of 
E. K. Stephens and James E. Byrne, 

The following property: v 

Mules, Horses. Cows, Etc. 




your last chance , Sheriff's Sale for Taxes. 



To Get Government Land In 



Notice la hereby given that I, or 



MinMoaia llnrlar a Cnaoial ° ne of nl . v deputies Will, On MtmdllV, 
innOSOta Under a 5pi0ialj February 2nd, 1920, it being County 

Homestead Aot at $6.25 Per 
Acre. 



Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. in. and 3 o'clock p. iu. at the Court 
House door, in the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., expose to 
Jiublic sale for cash in band, the fol- 
owing property, or so much thereof 

Tnrlian recurvation homestead ' ~ 8 m »y be necessary to pay State, 
Indian reservation nomesteaa Counfcy and School Ux dae thereon 

lands under Act of Congress pass- and unpaid for the year 1919, and the 

<>A loifi v^ ;»««.,„»,■.«♦. .-»* penalty, interest and costs thereon, 
ed 1918. No improvements, res- ! r For a c0mp i ete de8C ription of prop- 

idence or cultivation required. 
Long growing season, plenty of 
rain, no crop failures, good roads, 
churches and schools. The land 
will grow any crop that other 
land will grow, and more of it. 
This price covers payment for 
the laud to the Government, in- 
cludes all entry fees, two years' 
taxes and our services. Don't de- 
lay if interested. Call or address 

Minnesota Homestead Co. 

Suite 315 Tribune Annex, 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
-Adv. 



2 aged Mules, 9-y^ear old bay Mare, 7- 
year old Gelding, aged Mare, 8 -year 
old black Horse 4-year old Gelding, 2 
3-year old draft Mares, 9 Cows — two 

Farm Implements, Etc. 



with Calves, 7 Springers, S-year old 
Heifer— fresh in June, 23 Ewes, 9 
Yearlings, Registered Ram. 



Shovel Plow, Manure Spreader, 5- 
tooth Cultivator, 3 sets Double Har- 
ness, Scraper, Doubletrees, Singletrees, 
20 tons Hay, 8 Milk Cans, Milk Cooler 
and many other things too numerous 
to mention. -* 



McCormic Wheat Binder, Deering 
Mowing Machine, McCormjc Hay- 
rake, Hay Loader, 2-horse Sled, Hay 
Bed, 2 Riding Cultivators, Acme Har- 
row, Big Tooth Harrow, 3 Breaking 
Plow Pointers, 2 Singe and 1 Double 



ing 
fat 



Tributes of Respect. 

Grange Hall Camp No. 14429, M. W. 
of A. Union, Ky., Jan. 19, 1920. 

In memory of our neighbor, J. H. 
Stephens, who died Jan. 14, 1920: 

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty 
God in his wisdom to remove from 
our midst our beloved neighbor, who 
was the oldest member of our camp, 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That by his death the 
Lodge has lost a faithful and consis-, 
tent member of-the Order; the fami- 
ly, a loving husband and father, and 
that we extend our heartfelt sympa- 
thy in this their sad hour of bereave- 
ment. 

Resolved, That a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to the family, a 
copy spread upon the records of "the 
Lodge, and a copy be sent the Boone 
County Recorder for publication. 

Committee— John W. Aylor, H. W. 
Rouse, James W. Aylor. * 

Benefits of Farm Bureau. 



erty see Assessors Book for the as- 
sessment for 1918, at the County 
Clerk's Office: 

L. A. CONNER, 
Sheriff Boone County. 

Florence Precinct. 
Robinson, J. C. n r 13 acres . . $17.65 
Carpenter, Mary A, town lot. 1136 
Cleek, Albert, town lot. 7.92 

Constance Precinct. 
Phelps, Lewis, n r, town lot. 

Russ, James, town lot 

Zimmer, B. F., town lot 

Petersburg Precinct. 
Jarrell, Lewis, n r, town lot. 

Buliittsville Precinct. 
Anderson, E. M. n r town lot 

Belleview Precinct. 
Wingate, L, n r, 19 acres 

Hamilton Precinct. 
Rice, Erastus, 2 acres 8.26 



8.38 
6.90 
9.86 

6.78 

8.77 

10.68 



Following are some of the con- 
veniences and benefits the Bureau 
proposes to secure for the far- 
mers of the county : 

A county business and reading 
room. 

A meeting place for buyer and 
seller. 

A free stenographic service. 

A trade bulletin issued bi-week- 
the ly to each member. 



patron's own can a*d over 35,000 j A strong cooperative farmers' 
of the largest cream producers organization to compete with ail 
find it a big advantage to 8hip! otner organized business. 



DIRECT, as it gives the cream- 
ery so much better quality of 
cream and consequently a better 
price to the producer compared 
to the mixing of all kinds togeth- 
er. 

We will gladly semi Free Trial 
Cans for 30 days to any one need- 
ing cans to give us a trial. If 
you have cans, write for shipping 
tags. The Tri State- Butter Com- 
pany, Cash Capital, ^250,01)0 00 ; 9V) 
Kenyon Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio.— 
Adv. 



A just profit over coat of 
duction. 

Agricultural development 
their county. 

Drive for membership January 
'/6th and 27th. 



pro-i 
of 



Some who send items to the Re- 
corder neglect to sign (their 
names. All who ■send news/ to 
this paper art- requested to sign 
their name-s to the communication | column 



NOTICE. 
The dance at the I. O. O. F., 
Hall at Hebron, Ky. for the 23d 
imt , has been postponed one 
week, to Jan'y. 30th, to avoid 
conflict with the one to be given 
by the American Legion Boys 
at Florence. See adv in another 
Committee. 



Clarenco Mitchell delivered his 
crop of about 1,200 pounds of to- 
bacco to C. Scott Chambers, of 
Walton, lasi Monday, receiving 7U 
cents a pound all round for it. 



A dog belonging to L T (Ion 
and onv belonging to Robert 
are charged with raiding 
Peon's ahoop, l»ui their owners 
plead an alibi for them 

John Hogan, of Hebron ncflgii 
borhood, is spending the week in 
Louisville, whore he has hi>mi.iI 
hogsheads of IoImccq on tho 
market 



The Ante* advertised for 
• rrow, Vrlday nigbJ, 

been postponed, 



Don't let the big prices tobac- 
co is bringing detract your mind 
from the necessity of testing the 
eoru which you expect to use as 
sped next spring Corn is bringing 
H«»me price also and it will, not 
Da; by considerably to cultivate 
' "land that should be but Is not pro 
■W liming \ hill < )r two missing in 
each rOW til ■ large field amounts 
to ■ considerable area of nonpro- 
duclng land which «-an !>c reduc- 
ed to the minimum by using a 
high per <«.iit germinating seed 
corn Tin' vsrj i,4>Ht wed that 
can obtain w|l| be none too 
good for planting nest spring, so 
ascertain th.» reliability <>f your 
proposed aecd corn bj giving it 

u lb irough lent 



Public Sale. 

1 ♦ r 

We will offer at public sale at 
the residence of the late James 
H. Stephens, % mile north, of 
Big: Bone Grange Hall, on the 
Burlington and Big Bone road on 

Saturday, Jan'y 31, 1920 

the following property: 

3 good Milch Cows that will be fresh 
shortly, Holstein .heifer 9 months 
old, 4 Turkey hens (young), 2J doz. 
Plymouth Rock hens, lot Meat and 
Lard, Iron Kettle, Brass Kettle. Dix- 
ie Plow new, Double Shovel Plow, 
Single Shovel Plow, set Buggy Har- 
ness, Log Chain, Shovels, Hoes, 
Forks, 5 gallon Milk Can, 2 Churns, 
Household and Kitchen Furniture, 
and various articles too numerous 
to mention. 

Terms— All sums of $6 00 and un- 
der, cash ; on sums over $5.00 a cred- 
it of months without interest will 
be giveu, purchasers to give notes 
with approved security, payable in 
Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, 
Ky., before removing property. 

The farm of 9) acres will be offered 
for Bale at the same time and place. 
On the farm is a 4-rpotri house and 
other necessary buildings. The 
right will be reserved to reject any 
or all bids made on the farm. 

Mrs. J. H. STEPHENS A SONS. 
Sale to begin at 1 o'clock p. m. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

9 Six months time will be given without in- 
terest ; 3 per cent, discount for cash. 

E.K.Stephens. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock. J. H. EDDINS, Auctioneer. 

PUBLIC SALE. 



Having sold my farm, I will offer for sale at 

my residence on the East Bend road, four 

miles from Burlington, Ky., on 

Wednesday, January 21, 1920 



The Following Personal Property : 



SLOW 
DEATH 

Aches, pains, nervousness, diffi- 
culty in urinating, often mean 
serious disorders. The world's 
standard remedy for MHney, liver, 
bladucf and uric at.wtroublee ' 

GOLD MEDAL 



bring quick rottef and often ward oft" 
deadly di.Mi—. Known a. tb. national 
remedy of Holland for mors than 300 
year.. AH druggist., in Ihr*. 



II.' 

i. t 



about 

j.lkr 



Itytfc sees M anrea of Urn-i 
flA «ut m the WsUevlew 
l> ftoa Hejutor (ur W.M8 



U ,11,.. 
a Civil W*| 



M.MHll 
Vi'ttH III fl'll 



an 



|>NV«*m< ni )-.. iktii* hi* lack 
aiwl ng |,u skull 



Card of Thanks— We desire to 
thank our friends and neighbor* 
for their many kindness*" in our 
ilark hour* of sorrow during th« 
mckiUMMr and dtwth <>r our hua- 
baml and father, Jas II Htepheos 
K»l**(iaUy do wt» than*; the doc- 
tors, Si'mrnr and HyLp and the 
nurses for their taithfulnvsa, mi 
.1. uakw Bcolt Chamlair" for the 
o.turtud (he tuai||U 
rertofl for his •oiiatiUng 
l. oi MMBlort and the »' 
.mii WootfWM for their tout-hing 



7 year old bay Horse — weight 1,200 
pounds, 8 Shorthorn Cows to be fresh 
in Janury and March, 5 wealing 
Calves, 22 good Hampshire Stock 
Ewes to lamb about March 20th, 
Mowing Machine, 2-horse Cultivator, 
Wheat Drill, Riding Cultivator, Disc 
Harrow, Hinge Harrow, Jumping 
Shovel Plow, Double Shovel Plow, 
Dixie Plow, pair Check-lines, Bridles, 
Collars, set Buggy Harness, Buggy 



Pole, Singletrees, Pitch-forks, Breast- 
yokes, Doubletrees, Platform Scales, 
Lard Kettle, Lard Press, 16-foot Lad- 
der, 50-gallon Coal Oil Tank, Grind- 
stone, Sickle Grinder, 8-gallon Milk 
Can, 2-horse Sled, 12-foot Gate, new 
Dehorner, Walking Cultivator, Hay- 
rake, new Hay Bed, set Pulleys and 
100 feet new Rope, and many other 
articles too numerous to mention. 



TERMS OF SALE. — / 

On sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a 
credit of 9 months without interest, purchasers to give notes 
with approved security, negotiable and payable in Peoples 
Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky., before removing property. 

J. D. Acra. 

Sale to begin at 9 a. m. sharp. 



Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. 

a ) •> 

LUNCH FREE. 



FOR SALE. T- 

Two well-bred Holatein Friesian 
Bulla. 

No. I— Kinir Pletertle Mercedes. 
H B. No. 888977. Bom October 21, 
1019. Two-thirds white and a good 
Individual and right In every way. 
IVdiRHMMHi application. 

No. 2-Prlnce Pontlao Fiebe Echo 
No. 288978. Born Novmuber 16. 1919. 
Three-fourths whits. A good owe 
brad in the purple. 

Prised to sell if takj-n st once. 
CM AH. M. CAKI'KNTKK, 

ojri Krlanger, Ky.. H l>. I. 



FOR 8ALE. 

»*r Urn buggy. «o"dj« i>< 

uH*A»n«*ear n. wlvT>ali» 

UOUl ILK. 



jau 1622 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦•♦ 
TfKH HUH 



ew i 

My. 



ili IT'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, \fc 

W I 'W* von won't rw» rlinarinoirtt#>H in th#» anriniy. 



so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 

Hud .on Sp.Mi.ter $2318 40. 
Emi Touring $1888. 

Eimi Roadster $1888. 

Dodf. Touring $1178. 

Dodge Coup. $1887. 

Dodge Sedan $2025. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

ll»e above pries, are delivered at your door. 

If you want to place an order for any of these cars, 



s 

I 

Or 



((MNTY PAM.lt, 



■JP 



m 

I * 



B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. 




fi 




V 



• % 



r 



BOONS CO0WTY RBCORD1K 



f, 



w 



THURSDAY JAN. », l*i 

' J . ■' I I'tt 



- 



Great Things Planned For 
Famous Old Transylvania 

College of Bible and Hamilton College 
Included in Kentucky Disciples' Forward 
Step to Enlarge the Equipment of these 
Noted Institutions of Learning at Lexington 




Tot the maintenance of 
Its rightful place, so long 
occupied among America's 
leading educational Insti- 
tution!*, historic Transyl- 
vania, Lexington, Ky., Is to 
unlit- with tin; Disciples of 
Christ of the Slate, mid Its 
thousands of friends 
throughout the country, In 
a vigorous campaign for 
the Imperative enlargement 
of Its equipment and for 

an adequate 
c o m p ensu- 
tlou of- its 
fuculty. 

The Col- 
lege of the* 
Bible, for 
the gaining 
of men 
and wo- 
iD(2ii for 
the mln 
I s t r y 
ind mis- 
sion field, and Hamilton Col- 
lege, the Junior College for 
Women, will share In thl.i 
campaign, which Is to be con- 
ducted as. a part of the Inter- 
church World Movement 

Up to the time of the start- 
ing of the Interchurch World 
Movement financial drive, 
Transylvania and Its friends 
will conduct 
a campaign 
of educa- 
tion, In or- 
der that the 
urgent needs 
of these In- 
st It u tlons 
may be so 
well under- 
stood that 
every one 
„,. w will be glad 
of tho op- 
portunity of sharing In their 
support. 

.One of the first needs of 
the Institution Is a fire-proof 
building to house Its priceless 



1 



.•XI" ; 

i 







Trunlnafc, d» Tm-mw CaUr.it W U» Waal. I7H. 



library, worth more than a 
hundred thousand dollars, 
and which If destroyed* by 
lire could not be replaced. 
Another aim Is the increVse « 
of the salaries of the profes- 
sors to a living standard, 
making It possible to hold Its 
present fuculty, and to coiu- 
ninnd the very best available 
material for Increasing Its 
teaching force. Another aim 
Is the continuance of tho pro- 
gressive policies so long 
maintained by this historic 
college. 

Many other first rank col- 
leges throughout the country 
have already taken steps to 
uvert a crisis In educational 
affairs. With the increased 
cost of everything, it Is abso- 
lutely impossible for Institu- 
tions of learning to exist on 
the basis of former support. 

There Is also a widespread 
conviction of the necessity of 
the maintenance of (lie col- 
lege under distinctive Chrls- 
tion Influences. An investi- 
gation made a few years ago 
revealed these', significant 
facts: 

Eight of the nine Justices 
of the Supreme Court of the 
United States were college 
men ; seven cf the eight were 
educated In Christian col- 
leges. Eighteen of the twen- 
ty-six Presidents of the 
United States were college 
men ; sixteen of the eighteen 
were from Christian colleges. 




Eighteen of the twenty-six 
. recognized masters In 
Ainerican Letters- -were col- 
lege men ; seventeen of the 
eighteen were from Chris- 
- tlan col- . ■— 

leges. O f 
r the mem- 
bers of 
C ngress 
In 10 5 
who had 
r e c e I ve.l 
a college ed- 
ucation, and H H. CW»t> CUrk, • 
W tl O S e pi»*W«ITrf»rh»«aa 

achievements gave them a 
place In "Who's Who In 
America," two-thirds were 
graduates of church colleges. 
Transylvania and the Col- 
lege of the Bible have edu- 
cated one president, two vice- 
presidents, .the president of 
the Southern Confederacy ; 
also secretaries of state, 
t re a s u r y , 
post master- 
general, at- 
torney gen- 
eral; scores 
of United 
States sena- 
tors and con- 
gressmen ; a 
Speaker of 
the House ; 
ministers to 
many foreign countries ; gov- 
ernors of a Jnrge number of 
states; mayors of large cit- 
ies; authors of national and 
international r e p u ta 1 1 on ; 
physicians and surgeons of 
world-wide fame, and thou- 
sands of ministers and mis- 
sionaries of the Christian re- 
ligion. 

Dr. R'.chard H. Collins, th» 
historian of Kentucky^ char- 
acterizes its graduates "as 
statesmen, Jurists, orators, 
surgeons and divines among 
the greatest in the world's 
history — men of mark in all 
the professions and callings 
of life." 




Jaha F.i Jr , twtoJ ••- 
•Mtktr Tnaatt- 
»»»i« rata. 



"Trade Where they All Trade" 



are doing more business than any other house in Northern Kcncucky. 
WHY? Ask any of our customers about our Prices, Treatment, 
and Quality of goods. • 

Wlr. Farmer— 

Almost every day we get favorable reports on seeds we have 
sold. We do not handle low grade, trashy seeds. We know seeds 
and we know where to buy and we give you the benefit of our 
krioweledge and experience, When you order from us you can de- 
pend on High Test, Purity and Germination. y 

Send us your inquiries for prices and samples of CLOVER, AL- 
FALFA, ALSIKE, TIMOTHY, BLUE GRASS, ORCHARD 
GRASS, Etc. 

WE BUY RIGHT A ND WE SELL RIGHT. 

Send us your orders for Granula- 
ted Sugar. We will try to fill 



them. 



Blatchford's Calf Meal, cwt. $5.90 
Conceded to be the best on the 
market. 



f £If?rff& 



GROCeVt/£S. FLOUR S-eCDS.M£D/G/N£S 
/9-2IPIKEST. AS -20W.7™ ST. 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 

Phones South 338 and 336. ^ 

United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



1 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All CaUt Promptly Attended 

Twanty-one years Practice, 
Poena 7M WALTON, KY 



Wanted. 

Man with small family to raise 
tobacco and work bv the day. 
II. D SOUTHER. 
Burlington R. D. S, Consolidated 
phoat. ojau22 

Subscribe for the RIW OllDB' 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+•»>•»♦♦♦♦♦♦■♦'♦♦♦♦♦+•► 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

• VERONA 

e 

flsprmometer dropp?! Saturday 
night to near zero. 

A great deal of sickness in the 
neighborhood. Colds, mumps ana 
measles. \ 

Quite a number are delivering 
their tobacco to the loose leal 
tobacco market ait Walton/ v 

W. T. Renaker has sold his farm 
consisting of 160 acres, to a Mr. 
Craddock, of Walton, for {85 per 
acre. 

J. N. Powers, one of our mer- 
chants, is closing out his store. 
He has accepted a position with 
the Cincinnati Creamery and is in 
Chicago, IlL 



WOOLPER HEIGHTS. 



Ed. Eaaton and Cabil Beemon 
dug out a fine fox Saturday. 

Ohmer Easton spent last Sunday 
with his brother, Ed. on Woolper. 

Kenneth Rue visited at his uncle 
Henry Wingate's, Saturday night 
and Sunday. 

Geo. Hewett and Clara Seikman 
spent the latter part of ; .he week 
with his brother, Ben}, and wife, 
of Clevea. 

R. H. Walker delivered his to- 
bacco to the Covingtc.i .loose leaf 
last week, receiving an average of 
55 cents per pound. 

Mrs Willis Hensfey a:id littl? 
daughter, Roberta Lucille, spent a 
few days the past week with Mr. 
and Mrs. Newton Sullivan, Sr. 



: | j*\ ii i oa i i »v 

No Place Like Home, n 

I have a much larger stock of 

Hardware, Dry Goods, No- 
tions and Groceries 
for 1920 

Than I have ever carried before. 

International Trucks, International Tractors, 
International Road Wagons, 

International Manure Spreaders, 

International Primrose Separators* 

A Complete line of all kinds of farm fencing. 

- A nice line of harness, such as Bridles, Collars, Back Bands 
Check lines, and complete sets of harness. 

Feed. Flour, Salt, Etc. 

Some pretty patterns of Ginghams and Calicoes 
'to select from. 



♦ 



II 



BIG BONE CHURCH News 



Brother James Henry Stephens, 
son of Thomas P. and Elizabeth 
Stephens, was an esteemed mem- 
ber of this church for nearly 
twenty years. He was called home 
January lttb, aged 71 years, 
7 months and 13 daya He was 
married to Joanna Ryle, August 
31st, 1876. To this union wereborn 
six children. Three of these sur- 
vive him, with the widow. Funeral 
services were held at Big Bone 
church, Thursday, Jan. 15th. Pas- 
tor O. C. Peyton spoke a few words 
appropriate and helpful, suggest- 
ed by Rev. 14:13. Truly blessed are 
the dead who die in the Lord! 

Brother Stephens was held in 
high esteem in this community 
His life was one of faith in God 
and he was interested in tfie 
cause of the Master. So, we place 
his body to rest confidently as- 
sured that it is well with his soul. 

He was buried under th» aus- 
pices of the order of "Woodmen' 
of which he was a member. 



I think 1 will be able in a short while, when you come into 

my store and ask for an article, I can tell you that I 

have it for you at a price that you will be satisfied. 

If you have any country lard to sell, I want it, and will 
pay you a fancy price. Bring your eggs and poul- 
try to me for I have always led in prices. 

STAY BY YOUR HOME DEALER 

AND HE WILL STAY WITH YOU 



w 



V. 



L. KIRKPATRICK 

Burlington, Ky. 




;e 



s 



OUNPOWDRR 



Honor Roll. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ PETERSBURG. 

i 



Linme Busby purchased a new 
Essex auto, last week. 

Robt. Tanner and wife spent last 
Saturday with this scribe and wife. 

Geo. B. Miller sold his crop of 
'-tobacco, 855 pounds, on the Cov- 
ington loose feaf market last week. 
It brought $265.54. 

N. A. Zimmerman, Newton Marks 
berry, and Ira Tanner delivered 
their tobacco to Walton fast Mon- 
day to he sold this week. 

Uncle Steve Bobbins and son, 
Albert, sold their tobacco on the 
Covington loose leaf market last 



Mr. Earl Walton has a slight at- 
tack of rheumatism. 

Miss Eunice Willis has been the 
houae guest of Miss Edna Berk- ^week and the prices received were 



shire. 

Miss Ethel Sturgeon is spending 
a few days with relatives in Cin- 
cinnati 

A large crowd attended the so- 
cial at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
R. H'. Carter. 

The Petersburg Coal Co. is ex- 
pecting a barge of coal the first 
of the week. 

Porter Shinkle and brother, Geo. 
wUTTHOVe to the Nonthcuit farm 
in the early spring. 

The following have entertainea 
in honor of Miss Willis with din- 
ings: Miss Edna Berkshire, Mrs. 
L. S. Chambers and Mrs. Herma 
Mathews. 

Captain Alden has accepted a 
position in the office of Tax Com- 
missioner at Louisville, Ky. His 
services are to begin Feb. 1, anu 
they expect to move there later 
on 

Mra Fannie Berkshire "died Jan. 
17th, at 1 p. m. She was no pa- 
tient during her illness until death 
relieved her suffering. To the 
daughter and sons, may time ana 
fortitude assuage yqur suffering 



Honor Roll B. H. S. for Decem- 
ber : 

High School— 

EvaJene Stephens 

Intermediate. — 

Beatrice Huey, 
Mary McMuflen. 
Ahna Barnes, 
Milton Stephens, 
Ora Kelly, 
Albert Kirkpatrlck. 
Elizabeth Henaley, 
Edgar Maurer, 
Bessie Baldon. 

Primary- 
Franklin Maurer, 
Mary Louise Renaker, 
Lucile Rica 



Remember the Dance. 



satisfactory. 

The death of Martin Weaver 
was a great shock to this com- Remember the dance to be giv- 
munity. He was formerly a reai- en at Florence tomorrow, Friday* 
dent of the Union precinct and ' night by Boone Post No. 4 Amer- 
had a host of friends who are jean Legion. The committee is 
grieved to hear of his death. He sparing no effort to make at an 
waa a bosom friend of this writ- ideal social affair, and every ac- 
er and I always found him to be i commodation possible on a like 
an upright and hinorable gentle- occasion will be provided. If you 
man, and his association was a desire having, a real good* time 
great pleasure. We e x ten d our you should attend t his dance. The — 
sympathy to his bereaved family, i best of music has been secured 

' and those who delight in trip- 



FRANCESVILLB 



♦ 



Elmer and Raymond Cave spent 
Sunday with Orville Ogdein. 

James Beall, of Dayton, is the 
guest of 'his cousins, Jemeson ana 
Joseph Aylor. 



ping the light fantastic will have 
an opportunity to go the limit. 
Everybody is invited to attend 
and help the members of the 
post make merry. 



Went Over the Dump. 



One of the horses worked on 

the dump at the stone quarry on 

Mrs. John Grimm and daughters, ' the Constance hill went over the 

of Taylorsport, spent last Sun- dump last Monday and went down 

day afternoon at f. S. Egglestom's. an J l, « ,0 *J perpendicular incline for 

JL ... T . DI **.„_ . w about 100 feet. When the horse 

Mr and Mrs. Jake Blaacker had d cart u d d ^ honje waa 

as their guest Saturday night and der h cart and block ^ 

- ZT l s » nda y flr John Blaackar ' of In ~ i ropes had to be used to get him 

1 out. The horse was pretxy badfy 



♦ 



FLORENCE. 



Mr. Henry Olsner is home from 
the hospital. 

J. P. Tanner is out again after 
a severe cold. **■ 

• A. M. Yealey is very ill at his 
home on .Shelby atreet. 

Robert Tanner has returned to 
his work at Middletown, Ohio. 

Mra Anna Bradford is visiting 
her sister in South Carolina. 

W. H. Goodridge sold his farm 
on Pixie Highway to J B. San- 
ders 

Miss Mary Ehizabeth Bauers is 
able to be at work after several 
days illness. 

Harold Bentham, <>f Walnut 
^lls, epe"*» the week-end with 



d,ana 'out. The horse was pn 

Mrs Jack Muntz and little son bruised, and those who 'saw the 

spent several days last week with accident do not understand how 

lier parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. ^ happened he was not killed. 

Eggleston, near Hebron." mm 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reitmann ana 



little daughter, Alice Mar.e, of 
Hebron, ' w T ere Sunday guests of 
Wm. Reitmann and wife. 

— i 1 

♦♦♦•♦»♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 

• e 

a HEBRON. e 

e • 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

J. S. Lodge is sick. 



Dobs Kill Sheep. 

Dogs made a raid on the sheep 
of Mr. Geo. Penn near town one 
day last week and killed one 
and crippled one. The one killed 
was appraised at $35, ' and Mr. 
Penn saya he would not have 
taken 150 for it. The dogs made 
a second raid last Monday morn- 
ing, killing one and wounding 
one. The dogs were seen but 



Lewis Riddell and family were made good their escape. One is 



his brother, Ed. hen 
Richard Allen has moved 



from 



guests at M L. Aylors ,last Sun- 
day. 

Sunday school at 1 p. m. Com- 
munion services at 2 p. m., next 
?»nday. * /•, 

Jerry Garnett expects to move 



a light and the other a dark shep- 
herd dog. 




W - A- N -T- E - D 

Bsach, Syc arvor.. Mspl., 
Oak and Walnut Logs. 

If ynu lmv«' sin i" -ell writ* to 

0. C. MENOEL A BRO. 00. 
I ouUyIIU Kentucky 



The weather thin are as w dracrlb 

• «l I.) word, "allsort*'' 



Bought Fine Bull. 

A few days since "S. B. Ryle, of 

^dividual. Hi* sire- cap- 
gold medals at the an- 
aaiional stock show at 
r. Ryle paid 1503 for the 

o' clock the crowd was given a 

J. U Renaker's father and the ft iee lunch. Following is a list of j U- ,„, M . r*-it-i.M..l ui.a«h B » 
rest o<— the family are BOW com- n,o pa-sents: Norma anl Lloyd naVlflfl UCIignnul Wcainur. 
fortably settled in their new MtQlason, handkeichi.'fH; M ri t- Remitting for Ms Recorder W T. 
home here la and Aline Stephens and Norma |) UV i S) of Rlvervlew, Fl i , "write*; 

Miss Mil lied Rddina aave > six Worn*, sport scarfs; Roy Tanner, 4 , Wt , art> i^yjug f,,, . we uher hero 
o'clock dinner Sundaj n> honor Supporters; Eva Tanner, Gruveai noW L UHt wee fc Wl . had a killing 
of her brother, Alvin, who left daughters, Le<v.j Aylor and vile, fro(|t a „ d ,. w IS ,Lm.itt cold 
for Detroit, Michigan, Monday Mrs John Aylor, Raymond Brest, ,.„ ol , B h f ul , PlN hut this w«>ek rt 

Mian Anna Walker ^ i •■ 1 im oyer aocka| Fred Harnett, one dollar; XH simply grand warm sml sun 
by an auto driven bj (has Hiiy- n<t BniNt, poekvtnook : Me*daim*!» i ^,i n ( n g with flower* In I. loom and 
der, Saturday aftenn*"i The ea- j Qeo Gordon, K J. Aylor, Edward ,, u . , (il(l)i , |(! . jinglnf.'' 
tont of ho* iniurieii were nof >'«' Kinst, M C ltous»», oaeh a cake , 
tcrmined at. this vrxiting but were ii tt u-in CtorSi Llvu Csarnett, lk'»iue 
thought to In- voo-y bad Aylor, HallM* llafor, oaeh/s neek- 

■ j lie ; l laieiiw Hertnitrclt. Jesat. 

Allot the K oi l"» art* uigtnl to j don, l*east*» Hrn#t, each a hsnd- 
atteod tntneing on Saturday rttfht, kerchief; Janu<a..n Aykn-, luind- 
j an <n Work in '""at •*«<« kerchief and sui»|H»rtt«r. Mra 

M>«tiiitl \l. imaieh. Ivandk. i 



I 



Houpe Swimm. 

Oeo Swun, I.', muchliuat, t'ov* 
Ington, i»i>d Mia* • >"" ' H"Up«*. H. 
of High Mm Kranfcni • 

mai rUk< h i ■> ■ v t let a 



iki 



\ 



MpjMMtHpjpsjBjaaaj 



BBJBanajHnjtsJnaeajHnaai^ 



Bflija 



THURSDAY JAN. 22, 1919. 



ivuoNB COUNTY AECORDKR 



" 



m um.m t m .u ■■ i 



h . * M^ . , .< m+ ^.j P iqa a i 



ENTHUSIASTIC 

Art Thost Attending The Farm- 
ire Meetings To Organize 
A Farmers Bureau. 



The meeting held at the court 
house last Monday afternoon in 
the interest of the County Far- 
mers* Bureau, was attended by 
quite a good sized crowd of far- 
mers, and several of those who 
had not joined the move had their 
names enrolled that afternoon. 
Hon. Morgan Hughes, of Bowling 
Green, was present and delivered 
a very forceful address that was 
well received by his audience. The 
meeting was very satisfactory to 
those who are taking the lead in 
the organization of the Farm Bu- 
reau, and they report that the 
work of securing members in the 
several neighborhoods in thecoun 
ty is progressing better than was 
anticipated, and they have no 
doubts but what the membership 
at the conclusion of |the drive 
will exceed l.OOU in this county. 

The meeting held at Hebron 
Monday night was attended by an 
enthusiastic crowd of farmers anil 
the mames of twenty or more mem 
btrs were enrolled as a result of 
the speech delivered by Mr. 
Hughes. The objects of the Farm 
Bureau as are explained by the 
speakers make it a very use- 
ful organization for the farmers, 
and tney appear ready to give it 
a fair trial, and it will not be 
long until the Bureau will be in 
operation in this county unless all 
emphatic indications fail. 



TOBACCO MARKET. 

Covington, Jan. 19.— Offerings In 

the loose leaf market yesterday 
amounted to 95,905 pounds, one of- 
the largest single days sales of 
the current season. PriceB were, in 
the main, on a par with Xast 
week's best figures. The actual 
sales . for the day totaled 80.17U 
pounds, the cash value of which 
was $20,970.03, representing an av- 
erage of $33.61 per .100 pounds. 
Warehouse men stated that this 
was an unusually good Showing 
in view of the general quality of 
the tobacco on sale. Common red 
trash and lugs, both in dark and 
bright grades, were steady ait un- 
changed prices. Medium red leaf 
was, perhaps, a little easier than 
last week's closing figures. Colory 
grades were in good request and 
under keen competition were run 
no as high as $99 per 100 pounds. 



Lexington, Jan. 19— Reports from 
four of five houses selling on the 
Lexington market today gave a 
total of 890,115 pounds sold for 
an average of $57.02. The best crop 
average reported was $1 a pound 
for 7,805 pound s, and the best 
house average .*61.75 a hundred for 
a floor of 176,053 pounds. Two 
baskets sold for $1.05 a pound, the 
high basket record for the day»3 
sale. The market held steady at 
high levels of last week, with re- 
ceipts showing no tendency to 
decrease in volume and rejections 
practically unknown. 



Carrollton, Jan. 19.— The Carroll 
ton tobacco market was slightly 
stronger today on all grades, but 
with the worst breaks of the 
season, fully two thirds being of 
the lowest grades. Sales for the 
day 147,1*5 lbs., ave r a ging $ 3 2.2 7. 



HUGE FRAUDS EXPOSED. 

San Francisco, Jan. 15— Frauds 
involving millions oi dollars in 
connection with the building of 
ships for the Government in Ore- 
gon, Washington and California, 
have been unearthed by Govern- 
ment investigators, it became 
known today, when William 11. 
Tidwell, special agent of the 
Treasury Department, was appoint 
ed to be Chief Assistant to Spec- 
ial" Assistant United Stae* A.tor- 
i ey General Bert Schlesinger here 

It is understood that Attorttev 
General A. Mitchell Palmer, on the 
strength of Jho scope o f th e af-i 
leged discoveries of graft in Pa- 
cific coast shipyards' has order- 
ed the U. S. Shipping Board to 
hold up claims approximating $37, 
000,000 to await the outcome of the 
"investigation. 

The Government, according to 
information from authorative sour 
ces, is alleged to have been de- 
frauded of mor.-"- than $1,0011,000,000 
thru shipyard conspiracies work- 
ing Iby the payment of false vouch 
ers for arms that shipbuilders ob- 
tained illegally. 

A score of prominent shipbuild 
ers are understood to be involved 
in the investigation, which is 
said to have reached the stage 
calling for special Federal Grand 
Jury sessions in cities of Oregon, 
Washington and California where 
big shipbuilding plants are locat- 



OUR EVIL TENANT SYSTEM.; 

The one-year system has made 
of the average tenant a wanderer. 
He (moves from farm to farm, Sroin 
plantation to plantation, hoping 
to find something better then he 
leaves He takes no pride in his 
surroundings, has no interest in 
the community. Tomorrow he may 
be, likely will be elsewhere. He 
makes a most indifferent citizen, 
because he does not feel that he 
4s a tpart of his community ; there 
is nothing in his life that is in- 
spring, hopeful or helpful. Not^ 
only is he callous to his surround 
ings, but his children grow up 
without the sense of a neighbor- 
borhood spirit or even a home 
spirit, undeveloped mentally amd 
socially. So unattractive is the life 
of these plodders that when there 
develops among them one of 
stronger mentality, that one 
leaves the country for a mtor^ 
attractive and congenial and hu- 
man life in the cities. He resetnts 
being, merely a beast of burden. 

There must, therefore, be devel- 
oped a system of leasing that wilt 
have the merit of permanency and 
stability instead of , constant chang 
ing and uncertainty. The tenant 
must have the opportunity to 
build around him the simple at- 
tributes of a home. He must be 
encouraged to take an interest in 
his community life and to assume 
some of the responsibilities of 
citizenship. There is but one way 
to do this, and that is to give 
him a longer lease upon his land 
which he is to cultivate. A sys- 
tem of leasing that will give the 
tenant from five to ten years, in- 
stead of one, will do more to de- 
velop the social and economic wel- 
fare of our rural districts than all 
other influences combined. Any 
tenant knowing he may live in 
one house for a term of years 
willf irst of all become localized. 
He will take an interest in build- 
ing around him the modest com- 
forts of a home. He will have a 
sense of ownership, when other- 
wise he would be indifferent to his 
surroundings. He will ,to a very 
great extent, cease to be a roving 
shiftless man. Permanency will de 
velop in him a better citizen, one 
that "will become interested in com 
munitv affairs, in the church and 
school*. The children will have a 
far better chance to develop. 
Under such a system the tenant 
is (bound to be more prosperous. 

There are many people living in 
our cities who would be happy to 
get out into God's great green 
iiellds if such a prospect were 
offered them. With a denser 
population, rural life would grow- 
rapidly more attractive; commun- 
ity centers would come closer to- 
gether; there would be better 
churches with better pastors; bet 
ter schools with higher cl|ass 
teachers. Good roads would run 
from center to center; all civic 
and social enterprises would take 
on increased vitality. The over- 
powering attractions oi the cities 
would become neutralized by the 
ever-increasing attractions of ru- 
ral life. 

While the tenant is thus devel- 
oping, what of the landlord? The 
long-lease system will first of ail 
do away with the one-crop idea, 
It will allow the tenant a chance 
to inagurate a plan of crop ro- 
tation that will insure to his ben- 
efit and at the same time main- 
tain the soil fertility. This will 
be a great benefit to the owner 
of the land and to his posterity. 
One has only to travel over the 
worn and washed hills of West 
Tennessee to appreoiate the force 
of this argument. Posterity has in- 
herited fine fiejds indeed from 
its ancestors. 

Not only will fertility of the 
land be conserved but the tenant 
will take more pride in the ap- 
pearance of his home, and a good 
appearance makes for value. The 
health of the tenant will im- 
prove, for he will be willing to 
screen himself from flies and 
mosquitoes, if he is assured of a 
term of years to occupy a house. 
With better spirits, better plans, 
better health, the tenant becomes 
a more prosperous individual, the 
landlord becomes the owner of a 
more p:oductive and attractive 
fawn, even to the end that ho 
may charge a higher rent and 
the tena nt w ill be willing to pay 
it. 

If this long-lease system is thor 
oughly analyzed, there will not be 
found one single reasonable objec- 
tion, either from the atand-ptjifnt 
of the landlord or the tenant. 
That it would not work out to 
perfection at once is quite prob- 
able. The tenant body would be 
skeptical at first; but when they 
began to realize that such a sys- 
tem waB really intended by the 
owner of the land, their confi- 
dence would soon come, and they 
would take hold ; there would be 
a revolution in the social and 
economic condition of the tenant 
class; and this revolution would 
inure to the (xnefit of all oon- 
cerned. — Wesley Halliburton, in 
Southern Agricultirist. 



Commissioner's Sale, 

Boone Circuit Court, Ky. 
Hattie B. Tille.v Burns, Ac. Pitts. 

against | No. 21183 Equity 
Susie Tilley, Ac, Defendants. 

By virtue of a judgment and order 
of sale rendered by the Boone Cir- 
cuit Court at its Dec. term, 1919. 
in the above styled cause, I shall 
proceed to offer for sale at the court 
bouse door, in Burlington, Boone 
county, Kentucky to the highest 
bidder, at public sale, on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February 1920, at one 
o'clock p. m. or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
six and twelve months, the following 
property, to- wit: 

Lying and being in the town of 
Petersburg, Boone County. Ky., and 
being the west half of Lot No. 93 as 
laid down on the plan and plat of 
said town. 

For the purchase price the purch- 
aser, of eaid real estate, with approv- 
ed security or securities,muet execute 
bond, bearings per cent interest from 
the day of sale until paid, and hav- 
ing the force and effect of a Judg- 
ment, with a lion retained therein 
until all the purchase money is paid. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
with tlitse terms. 

CHAS. MAURER, 
Master Commissioner 



Commissioner's Sole. 



oone Circu it Cou rt.. 

W. M. Walton, Ac, Plaintiffs 

against. \ Equity 
Elinor Walton, Defendants 

By virtue of a judgment and order^of 
■>aleof the Boone Circuit Court, render- 
ed at the Dec. term, thereof 1919, in 
the above eause, I shall proceed to offer 
for .-ah- ut the court-house door in Bur- 
lington, Boone County. Ky., to the 
highest bidder at public auction, on 
Monday the 2d day oi February,-1920, 
at 1 o'clock p. m , or thereabout, being 
■ ■mi my court (lay, upon a credit of six 
and twelve months, the following 

described property, to-wlt: 

' Lying and being in Boone County, 
Kentucky, and bounded as follows, 
beginning at a stone on the road that 
leads from the Anderson Ferry road 
to Florence, corner of the lands of 
R. F.Clutterbuck heirs; thence s21J 
w 26.20 chains to a store in a line of 
Win. Cloud; thence with his Hue n 
41 w 12.34 chains to a stone in the 
Anderson Ferry road; thence with 
the road n 18J e 18.52 chains, n Vb\ 
e 13.17 chains to a stone; thence with 
the road that leads from Anderson 
Ferry road to Florence s 41J e 13.44 
chains to the beginning containing. 
20 acres, 2 roods more or less and be- 
ing the same property conveyed by 
deed recorded in Deed Book No. 40 
page 497. 

The interest of the infant defend- 
ant will not be paid by the purchases 
but shall remain a lieu on the said 
land bearing interest until the said 
infant become of age, or until the 
guardian of said Infant executes 
bond as required- by section 497 of 
the civil code. 

For the purchase price the pur- 
chaser, with approved security or 
securities, must execute bond, bear- 
ing legal interest from the day of 
sale until paid, and having the force 
and effect of a Judgment, with alien 
retained therein until all the pur- 
chase money is paid. Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly 
with these terms. 

CHARLES MAURER, 

Master Commissioner 



Commissioner's Sale. 



One hundred and eight defend- 
ants charged in indictments with 
violating the war time prohibition 
law stated Monday in the United 
States court in Coving; ci that 
they would enter formal pleas of 
guilty when their case* are called 
Tuesday. Nine defendants entered 
pleas of not guilty, two cases were 
deferred temporarily and one ea- 
pias was issued for a defendant 
who failed to answer to his mum-. 

Miss Nell Martin entertained tho 
following guests last Friday ulglff : 
Mr. and Mrs K Mi Arnold, Mi , 
Ruth Kelly, Mr L T. I'tzuol.Mi . 
Lillian Briatow, Mr bVnjamin II 
Riley, Miss Jessie Leo Cleeh, and 
Mr Courtney Koliy. 

The flu has made Its ap r ai 
in several cities throughout tho 
tountry. So far it has been i 
a mild form 

Mont BlayUeh has sold bin housv 
ssd lot in BurtiOf too Co Mr Add 
Bobbin. Consideration, »I,»M 



State news. 



Mavsville — Wm 
became c e l e b r a ted 

for 10 days se\ i t.il j i 

at his home bore, 
Danville - Monte 

M head of < \ pm t 

Logan Ctldweii B < 1 1 
averaging lt;r> pound 

Louis' ill- i i 
lions, to m led 
it a'.c cum (Mitiun 
will Im> Ik M evi 
he. in Sl.i'e < 'cm ! 
cell (I 



Truul. -n, 
^heri he i" 



ceil: 

I I ;ic 



who 
is'e 1 
cli U 



p 1 1 L' i , . 

from 

Uv. 



rii'. ma 
leleg.tte 

Mai eh 
>.% t It. 



Oh FefciftohToT 
Sell Land. 

By virtue of a judgment and or- 
der of sale of the Boone Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December Term, 
thereof, 1919, in the above cause, 
I shall proceed to offer for sale at the 
Court-house door in Burlington, Boone 
Co. Ky., to the highest bidder, at pub- 
He sale on Monday the 2d day of Feb. 
1920, at 1 o'clock p. m., or thereabouts, 
beinjj county court day, upon a credit 
of six and twelve mouths, the follow- 
ing de.-erlbed property, to wit: , 

Lying and beiug in Boone County, 
Kentucky, and being Lot No. 8 In 
flic division of the land in case of 
Frank Walton, Ac, vs. Margaret 
Eshmnn, etc. Beginning at a stake 
in the Petersburg and Bellevue Bead 
a corner with Lot No. 2 ; thence with 
a line of said Lot s 63J w 52 chains to 
the upper corner of Lot No. 2 on the 
Ohio river; thence up the river n 86$ 
w 3 00-100 chains to the lower corner 
of Lot No. 4, including all lands west 
of said line; thence with a line of 
Lot No. 4 n 68$ e 53.44 chains to the 
buginging, containing sixteen and 
one-half acres (16$.) 

The interest of the infant plaintiff 
Margaret Eshman shall not be i aid 
but shall remain a lien on the land 
until the said infant becomes of age, 
or until the guardian of said infant 
execute bond as required by section 
498 of the Civil Code. 
For the purchase price the purchaser 
with approved security or securities, 
must execute bond, beaiitu; legal inter- 
est from the day of sale until paid, sod 
having the force and effect or a judg- 
met i, with a lien returned therein un- 
til alt .'tie p(/i..iH» atoticy" is pafu. 
bidders will be prepared to comply 
promptly with thenMerm-j. 
CHARLES MAURER, M. C. B. 



Commis sione r's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court, Kentucky. 

Elizabeth Close, Ac., plaintiffs, 

against | No. 2998, Equity. 
Agnes F. Spacy, Ac, defendants. 

By virtue of a judgment and order 
of sale of the Boone Circuit Court 
rendered at the December term 
1919, in the above eause, I shall pro- 
ceed to offer for sale at the Court p 
House door In the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., to the high- 
est bidder at public sale, on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February, 1980. at 1 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts, being 
County, Court day, upon a credit of 8 
and 12 months the following proper- 
ty, to-wlt- 

Lying and being In Boone County, 
Kentucky, near Belleview. Lot No. 
1, called the Hill Traot, and seta- 
part toEllzabeth Grant, beginning at 
a stone, a little west of Middle creek 
in a line of the heirs of William 
Willis, deceased, and corner to 
M hennas Dlnsmore, thence with 
Dinsmorc's line and also a line of D. 
O. Rice n29}w 116} poles to a -stone, 
corner to said Rice In a line of the 
heirs of Ezekiel Rice, deceased; 
thence with a line of said heirs n60] 
e 21 poles to a stone, a corner of lot 
No. 2; thence with a line thereof 
s22Je 114 poles to a stone in a line of 
the Willis heirs aforesaid; thence 
with it s60jw 21 poles to the begin- 
ning, eon tining nfteen (15) acres. 

Parcel "B" lying and being in 
Boone county, Ky., adjoining the 
town of Belleview, is bounded and 
described as follows : Beginning At 
an iron pin in the Burlington and 
Belleview road, corner of parcel 
"A:" thence with a dividing same, 
n29jo 21.24 feet, to a pin In a line of 
William Huey, corner of parcel A; 
thence with a line of said Huey 
ii59$w 180J feet to n stake, corner of 
lot No. 2 in a line of William Huey: 
thence with a ltne of No. 2s29)n 21.24 
feet to a point in the center of the 
pike; thence with thecenterof same 
n60e 189 feet to the beginning, con- 
taining nine and ninety-four one 
hundredth acres (9.94), called parcel 
l 'B" in the division of the seventeen 
acre tract as set out in the Commis- 
sioners' report and also the survey- 
or's report in this case. 

For the purchase price the purch- 
aser, with approved security or se- 
curities, must execute bonds bearing 
legal interest from the day of sale 
until paid, and having the force and 
effect of a judgment, with a lien re- 
tained therein until all the purchase 
money is paid. Bidders will be pre-' 
pared to comply promptly with these 
terms. - 

CHAS. MAURER, 
Master Commissioner. 





aSuro 




Commissioner's Sale. 



Boone Circuit Court. 
Margaret Om an's Guardian. P lff | g^Vs - ftha/inp, b4.V}w" 2 «V chains t<Ta 



Boone Circuit Court, Kentucky. 

T. W- Cook, Executor, of Ben Cook, 
deceased, plaintiff, i 

against | No. 2984. Equity. 
Leila Cook, Ac , defendants. 

By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the special 
term thereof, 1920, in the above cause, 
I shall proceed to offer for sale at 
the Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at public sale on Monday, 
the 2nd . day of February, 1920, at 1 
p. m., or thereabout, being County 
Court Day, upon a credit of 6 moths, 
the following property : 

Bounded and described as follows : 
Lying and being in Boone County, 
and bounded thus: Beginning at a 
point in the center of the Belleview 
and Waterloo road, corner with J. 
W. Portwood; thence'witb the road 



quTty. "point in the center of said rood, cor 
ner with homestead tract No. 1; then 
with the line of same s60| w l'B chains 
to a stake ; thence n 56 w 7.66 chains 
to a post, corner with the homestead 
in a line of S. B. Scott; thence with 
Scott's line 1.48 chains to an Ash 
tree; thence n 40} w 4 28 chains to a 
post corner with Scott, and Ephriam 
Aylor; thence with Aylor'B line n 
11| e 10.42 chains to a post a corner 
with Aylor and J. W\ Portwood; 
thence with Portwood's line s 67 e 
7.00 chains to a post ; thence s 60 e 
10.21 chains to a post; thence n 28} e 
3 41 chains ; thence s 60| e 12 chains 
to the beginning containing 25.97 
acres to be known as Tract No. 2. « 

Tract No. 1 (Homestead) is boundr 
ed as follows: Lying and beiuglin 
Boone County, Kentucky, on the 
Waterloo and Rabbit Hash road and 
bounded as follows: Beginning at a 
point in the center of the Rabbit 
Hash road a corner of Laura Clore ; 
thence with Clore's linen 72} w 11.48 
chains to a post a corner with S. B. 
Scott; thence with Scott's line n 10} 
w 8.47 chains to a post a corner with 
Scott and Lot No. 2 ; thence with the 
line thereof n 56 e 7.66 chains to a 
stake; thence b60{ e 15 chains to a 
point in the center of the aforesaid 
pike; thence with same 41 8-4 w 1.00 
• 77} w 8.81 chains, s 66} w 8.88 cbns. 
to the beginning containing 11.87 
acres. 

I will first sell tract No. 2 contain- 
ing 26.97 acres, land if said tract fails 
to produce enough money to satisfy 
said Citizens Deposit Bank's debt, 
interest and cost, I will offer and 



do Hoc Ration 

TNTIL you feed Tuxedo Hog Ra- 
W tion you cannot know how cheap- 
ly pork can be developed. Tuxedo is 
a quick fattener — a never-failing pro- . 
ducer of live, sturdy, good looking 
hogs. The formula is compounded 
along lines suggested by a prominent 
State Experiment Station Official. 

Note of what Tuxedo Hog Ration is made, 
and you will understand why it is so very 
nutritious: Digester Tankage, Corn Meal; 
Ground Barley, Ground Oats, Wheat Mid- 
dlings, Old Process Oil Meal, Gluten Feed, 

Alfalfa Meal. 

« 

t This balanced mixture is sweetened with 
Cane Molasses. 

A 1ST A T VQTQ. PROTEIN 14.5%v FIBRE 7% 
/TLlNrlJLf 1 OlO. CARBOHYDRATES 55%: FAT 3.5% 

Made by the Manufacturers of Tuxedo Chop, Ce-re-a-lia 
Sweets, Tuxedo Scratch, Ce-re-a-lia Egg Mash 

See Your Nearest Dealer 

FOR SALE BY 
A. DOLWICK, Constance. JACK BERKSHIRE, Petersburg. 
M. L CRUTCHER, Hebron. A. F. M1LNER, Constance. 
GULLEY * PETIT, Burlington. J. H. MANNIN, Hebron. 
STANSIFER * POWERS, Walton — 



* ■ 




A. E. FOSTER & SON 

FARM SALESMEN AND 



LICENSED AUCTIONEERS 



Mo. 3 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 

Will be pleased to talk over with you, either the sale 
2 or purchase of farm property. 

ilgEs^s^Ja^ir^aryjraa^^ 



ri s THE 

KITCHEN 
CABINET 






Tips from Texas. 

And sj von if a man could escape 
matrimony he would still hnvo 
death and ,-taxe* to contend with. 



3rd, l> 



One 

ihing 

'k'i" 
- ' ooo 



way to avoid starting wmt* 
you can't finish is not to 
a IStOOO house with less than 



Mud 'h' hi \ i lit 
off the man! 

i Ion III >. I ui,k 

shotgun 

* 4H « DUmilHi I 



parents, u, 



i .ii 



U lul. 

Imt 



ml'' 



I. 



tic, 



I U HI 

liome 

i i loader) 

II" I it' i 

I M , I | I I ■ 



lot 

'. Jamjp » uiniiilii i 

. ha i . 

mong lepsra, and 



a 

the world Is full «>( 

did you over see any- 

Irl 



Of coursi 
pathos, but 

II ui£ worm* than a bowl»g u 
MM to wear a narrow ski 

l'< tsoimUy wt. art opposed to 
i ..lit swaths?! bill if wo iiov or had 
any a/later the girls might Ixh-omio 

Ion utterly Ut»org«ttt* 

lli«' i»a*oii ws hato to foud it 
mail |I0 Is bteejMe it le»H «muuglt 

to III HI I It feud o 

I 111 I II I II *>f 

Ualta* N"*'» 



#ell snoqgh ot fcrsr* VTo. 1, r 
the homestead tract, to satisfy the 
balance ot said hank debt, Interest 
andcosts; I will then sell the fee in 
traot No. 1 or Homestead or any 
part thereof that may then remain 
unsold after the satifaction of said 
bank debt, Interest and costa, sub- 
ject to the right of occupancy by 
said Willow. 

Tlie above two tracts of land be- 
ing the same conveyed to Haio dece- 
dent. Ben Cook, by J. W. Portwood 
and wife by deed recorded In Deed 
Hook No. 67, page SilO, Boone County 
Keuorda. 

Amount of'Cltizens Deposit Bank 
dubt. Interest and ooats. 1810.72. 
Fori the purchase price the purWiaaar, 
with approval security ot securities, 
muHtexecute bouds.bearlng legul littsr 
est from the day of sale until ptld.aud 
hie e tlm force mid <*fl«"'l "f a Judgment . 
with alien rfUlucd thareln until all 
ih»« |>uicham> luouwy Is psld. bidders 
will t»e prepared to comply ptemptly 
with these terms. „„„. 

CHAKLEfl MAI1KI 

M **(♦■!' * 'oiuinlaslunnr. 



If you've anything g-ood to say to a man, 
Don't watt till he's laid to rest; 

For the eulogy spoken when hearts are 
broken 
la an empty thing at best 

HOT WEATHER DISHE8. 

During the warm weather cold 
meats and meat loaves are popular, 
as they may be prepnred 
the day before usIiir, 
keeping welt for Rev era I 
days on lee. 

Jellied Veal— Wipe n 
knuckle of veal nnd cut 
It Jnto pieces, put It In- 
to u kettle with two 
quarts of wuter, hrtn« 
slowly to the simmering 
point nnd simmer for 
two hours ; then ndd two onions, one 
blade of mace, one hay leaf, twelve 
whole cloves, six pepper corns, half 
a teaspoonful of ground allspice nnd 
simmer one hour longer. Take out the 
knuckle, carefully remove the hones 
nnd put the meat Into n square mold. 
Boil the liquor until reduced to one 
quart, strain, ndd a quarter of a cup 
of good vinegar, and salt and" pepper 
to taste, pour It over the meat nnd 
set away to cool over night. When 
cold turn it cnrefully out of the mold, 
Veal Loaf — Chop three und one-half 
pounds of veal and a half pound of 
hnm, both uncooked; ndd to them one 
cupful of bread crumbs, one teaspoon- 
ful of salt, one teaspoonful of onion 
juice, half a teaspoonful each of pep- 
per, sage, cloves and allspice, tolx 
thoroughly with two well beaten efegs 
and press into a pan to mold. Turn out 
on n baking pan and brush with bent- 
en egg and bake In a slow oven for 
two hours, basting three or four times 
while baking" with butter and boiling 
water. 

Italian Cheese — Take one pound of 

venl, one and one-half pounds of calf's 

.^UlM-, half a ,A>und ot ith.Jr one ..Jtnll 



— Both Phohkb 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 

Boone House, 
BURL1NOTON, n KY. 

Prompt Attention to all Calls'. 

g? = 

Attention tots Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 
repairing on all makes or cars. 
Starter and generator work a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Ear. M . AyTor*~ 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 




WHY BUY A SCRUB 
SIRE 



bulerrM* for thw RBCORDER 



onion, half a teaspoonful of sage, two 
tnblospoonfuls of chopped .parsley, 
one-fourth of a box of gelatine, two 
tenspoonfuls of salt, one-fourth of n 
teaspoonful of blnclc peppi* and n 
dash of eayerme. Wnsh the liver, cov- 
er with boiling wnter and let stand 
pvc minute*, then drain nnd dry. Chop 
the liver, the venl, the ham (nil un- 
cooked) very fine; then add the sage, 
parsley, suit, pepper, cayenne nnd 
onion, gpnted. Mix well. Orense b 
mold and press tho meat tightly Into 
It, cover and steam three hours. He 
move tho rover and pour off the hroth 

and imI<l to it the gelatins which has 

been soaking In bold water to cover 
for half an hour. 

• And If Noah had boon Uko some 

relies he would have loaded the 
rk with liquids until £htm» 
wouldn't have b*«h any room for 
the animals 




JERSEY HILL FARM 

The Home of Pure Bred 

JERSEY CATTLE 

— aed— 

Chesterwhite Hogs 

offers for sale s few choice boar 
pigs. Prices Reasonable. 

S. B. RYLE, 

R. 1 Grant, Ky., 

L Farmers Priorre. 



t « 




WANTED. 

Men to raise tobacco on new 
ground and work by the day when 
not In the crop. 

W. A. GAINES & 90N, 
ofebS Burlington, Ky. 

R. D. L 



Wanted To Buy Farms. 

Any size or location. Cash buyers 
for all kinds. Wend me list, size 
and prlco. 

Wm. E. HAIRD, 
10-oct g r lange r , Ky 

DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

«.&»DBlNTIST^s%^ 

Will beatBurlluKton every Mondsy 
prepared to do all dentivl work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 




wwfWlF690JWtPtb$09&m 



WT.IOOMIS 



TAK* YOUR COUNTY PAP1R. 



F\ 



'if, 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. xxxxv 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY JANUARY 29, 1920 



$1.50 Per \ ear 



No 18 



$100,000,000 BONO 
ISSUE FOR KENTUCKY 

* 

Governor Morrow Requested to 
Consider the Matter. 

Kentucky Is One of Few States 
Without a Bonded Debt 



Louisville. — Advisers of Gov 
Morrow are urging him to con- 
• Aider the issuance of between $75, 
000,000 And &L00-million of bonds 
for Kentucky, it was learned to- 
day. The iasuo would be voted* 
on this year. The money would be 
expended on a complete system 
of roads, a modern educational 
system, thorough rehabilitation 
of the State's antiquated penal 
and charitable institutions, wiping 
out of the floating debt and the 
erection of modern buildings and 
other permanent improvements for 
every branch" of the State's gov-j 
eminent Providing Gov. Morrow 
should recommend a bond issue, it 
is urged that a sum sufficient to 
place Kentucky in the Xromt 
rank among States of Ithe country 
be authorized. It has also been 
pointed out that Kentucky iaooe 
of the few States of Che union 
without a bonded debt and that 
its backwardness in many essen- 
tial matters is attributable to, a 
policy of avoiding a bonded debt 
with Which to make permanent 
improverrients. That the bond is- 
sue would have , a ready sale N is 
the opinion of New York and 
Louisville brokers, as the State's 
credit is excellent and its assets 
and resources many times in ex- 
crss of a $75,000,000 issue. It was 
pointed 'out that Louisville, with 
one tenth the population of. Ken- 
tucky, has a bonded debt in ex- 
cess of $12,000,000. If the State 
had a bonded debt at the same 
ratio it would be $120,000,030. 
Among cities of the country Louis 
vilie's bonded indebtedness is 
small based both on assets and 
ratio of population. 

Tha Senate Rules. 

It was rather a wholesome sign 
when one Democrat refused to 
stand with his party and defeated 
the drastic rules of the Ken- 
tucky Senate proposed by the 
powerful rules committee. Bt was 
no more than ought: to have been 
expected that the Democrats, hav 
ing a majority, would demand 
and secure control of the body. 
But .when that majority undertook 
to force through such draatic 
rules as, proposed by the rules 
committee, it was an act of bold- 
ness, and at the same time an 
act of patriotism on the part of 
Senator Button to break with his 
colleagues in the interest of fair 
play. 

It is not a fair answer to the 
assertion that the Republicans, if 
given the power, would have done 
the same thing. They probably 
would, but if we do the same 
thing as they, we are as bad as 
they, and there would not be 
any distinction in being a Demo- 
crat. Besides the old law of ''an 
eye for an eye and a tooth for 
a tooth 1 ' was abrogated by that 
other rule which reads r'Therefore 
ail things whatsoever ye would 
that men should do to you, do ye 
even so to them.'' 

There are lots of important 
things to be done at this session. 
The Governor has promised many 
reforms. If these are to be real 
instead of pre-^lNction promises, 
then he must have the co-opera- 
tion of the General Assembly. The 
Democratic majority in. the Sen- 
ate could exercise its strength 
to see that the Governor did 
mean what he said. They should 
help him. If he goes wrong, start 
him fon the right path. If he is 
remiss in urging the proper rem- 
edial legislation, give him a gen- 
tle reminder. But in all his ef- 
forts to tio the right thing, stand 
always ready to give him the 
necessary votes. You need not be 
afraid that he will get too much 
credit. The people are discriminat- 
ing and will know where to place 
the proper credit. But if he is ham- 
pered in his efforts by dilatory 
tactics of by open hostility, then 
he will get all the credit due 
him, and then some. 

It is Just as well to let it bo 
known that the Democrats in the 
Senate are not voicing the senti- 
ments of the Democratic voters 
in attempting high handed meth- 
ods.— Owenaboro Inquirer. .. 



i 



Willed Their Land to Jesus. 

One hundred and twenty acres 
of land near Mexico, Mo , was deed 
ed to Jesus Christ 70 years ago, 
according to the records contain* 
ed in Randolph county. 

The dood was made by Johnson 
Wright and wife hecnusr ihey bo- 
lit ved it their duty to return 
to the Lord the material goods 
with which He hud blessed them. 

The lawful luirs continue to live 
on tnT land since the death Of 
the Wiights, holding it "in trait.* 1 

Ot Heart Out of Patient. 

Physicians rut the hrar<t out of 
Bteve SakJoAi an Austrian; ol Om- 
aha, Neb, thstl placed it back in 
■■■ly Zukirh, who h.1 I tflOl 

himself, U aapectftl lo live 

The in iu t win lifted eo npteteb 
out o( the a hull* imbed 

ded hi tt removed, the lumrt re» 
placid in its natural plae«> and tho 

iixiiiion sewed up Kaslfh i« row 

PS ting solid food mill I. <m t lit* 

high i.>«d ' ■ *ry 



Had a Fine Winter Sa Far. 

Remitting for her Recorder, Mrs. 
Dora Bannister, of Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, writes: 

"Please find enclosed fl .50 to 
renew my subscription to the 
Recorder. I also send Billy Sun- 
day's funeral oration over John 
Barleycorn. We have had a fine 
winter, not much below freezing 
Have not had any snow and very 
little rain. Billy Sunday said he 
spent six weeks, the happiest time 
since he had been preaching white 
in Chattanooga. Re said fit was 
the finest climate, the lovliest 
scenery, the moat historic coun- 
try and the beat people he had 
ever met. Hundreds of people 
have united with the different 
churches. He did worlds of good 
and his name will always be cher- 
ished by his good works. C. E. 
James offered him a home on Sig- 
nal Mountain free of charge if he 
would come and spend his two 
months' vacation and to rest up 
r.ext summer, and when he retires 
from preaching he could select 
any spot he desires up there and 
build on it and spend the re- 
mainder of his days'' 

FEDERAL AID ROAD. 

Copying the Recorders article in 
regard to Boone county s position 
concerning the Federal Aid Road 
from Louisville to Covington, the 
Warsaw Independent goes on to 
say : 

"It is very true, as the Recor- 
der states, that the public is gen- 
erally dissatisfied with the pres- 
ent road system and that senti- 
ment is not confined aione to 
Boone county. However, a system 
that would give satisfaction will 
only be adopted and put in prac- 
tice when people have some idea 
of the cost of road building. The. 

freat trouble with all the roaa 
usiness is that the public had no 
adequate conception of the cost 
of roads and is also regardless of 
the fact that a sufficient main- 
tenance fund should always be 
provided for every mile of roa-J 
that is built. 

'The road fund in every county 
in the State practically is insuffi- 
cient to build and maintain its 
highways, except in those coun- 
ties where a special tax has been 
voted for that purpose. Gallatin 
county has an annual load fund of 
something over 14,090, we believe, 
according to the regular roai 
levy, and that amount is almost 
too small to take into the ques- 
tion seriously when it is consid- 
ered that there are 150 miles of 
road in the county to be main- 
tained. 

"The U. S. Government will be 
compelled one would think, to 
take a hand in the road building 
program of every State in' decid- 
edly more marked and effective 
style than it has ever done be- 
fore. Aa a matter of fact, the 
millions of dollars the government 
has wasted in building dams in the 
Ohio river would equip the State 
with a good road system. The ap- 
propriations for locks and dams, 
which have run into millions and 
probably billions of dollars, have 
all been obtained at the hands 
of the Rivers and Harbors Com- 
mission, and a Good Roads Com- 
mission could very likely seciu-e 
as favorable results in the way of 
good roads appropriations if the 
public would manifest enough in- 
terest to thoroughly organize on 
the proposition and then see to 
it that the question of Federal 
Aid for State Highways was a part 
of the platform of every candid- 
ate for Congress. 

"If the franchise of the jieopfe 
is to be invested in any man who 
seeks to represent them in Con- 
gress, then have this man mani- 
fest the proper regard for their 
interests by pledging himself to 
legislation that will take the 
roads of the country out of the 
sorry plight into which they have 
fallen oeeauBe there has never 
been any considerable organisa- 
tion of good roads sentiment. 

'This sentiment must be organ- 
ized the country over if the peo- 
ple expect the kind of roads that 
are necessary for transportation 
conveniences of the present day. 
The sooner this is done and also 
the sooner the pubiic conception 
of the cost of good roads is rais- 
ed several degrees, the sooner will 
we have a well defined program 
of good road building that will 
give each State and each county a 
dependable system of highways 
that will answer every need of 
passengers and freight traffic 

oMUiamstoWn, ijrfant county, has 
increased only 60 in population. It 
had 800 ten years ago says the 
News. 



PONY EXPRESS 

Carried Mail y Weekly, Making 

Thousand-Mile Tripe Aeraae 

Great Wilderness. 



NOTICE. 

See H. R. Leidy for Delee Light and 
I Power Plant who Is now Dsleo n«r- 
! vice man in this potrOftj ; he will be 

glad to explain* the DSs es sl ty and 

convenience of Delco Lights. 

Florence, Ky. R. i). 

Phone, Burlington 318. 



DELCO-UGHT 

Ths complct* El«ctrk Light and 
Poww PUnt 

Eluotrt* llulu iiml power for lin. Until 
• i.u mi- paying ><>i i««,r unlit. 




FHANK A, AVI MBBCK. 

Ill I'fTMiUl I. I'l.olll 

Soinli i. 



Just 60 years ago the pony ex- 
press which carried tetters from 
st. Louis to San Francisco m 
eight days was inaugurated. To- 
day plans are being made to es- 
tablish a transcontinental air- 
plane mail service, and trail-blaz- 
ing flights have been made, as fat- 
West aa Omaha. 

It was a great achievement 
when the pony express was in- 
augurated to carry the maif to 
the young and bustling state of 
California in' 1880. Its inaugur- 
ation was preceded by the publi- 
cation In a St. Louis (paper in 
March of that year of the follow- 
ing advertisement : 

"To San Francisco in eight days. 
The first carrier of the Pony Ex- 
press will leave the Missouri Riv- 
er on Tuesday, April 3, and will 
run regularly weekly thereafter, 
carrying letter mail only. Tele- 

Sraph mail eight days, letters ten 
ays to San Francisco.*' 
The population of San Francis- 
co and other California towns eag 
erly welcomed this service, which 
brought them into HMSch. with 
the states from whielTThe fortune 
seekers had migrated. 

Ten riders traveling each way, 
with a change of horses every 25 
miles, brought the pouches of mail 
across the thousand-mile wilder- 
ness. The pony express, with its 
fast riders, among them "Buffalo 
Bill'' (Colonel) William F. Cody) 
then a young man, was one of the 
most romantic features of the 
great Western country. Many were 
the adventures these daring rid- 
ers had. They advanced 75 miles a 
dayH^ut often covered double that 
distance. "Buffalo Bill'' once made 
a ride of 384 miles when a relief 
messenger was killed. On many 
occasions, chased by Indians or 
"sniped'' by outlaws, the pony 
express riders were exposed of- 
ten to death, and they braved 
rain and snow storm as part of 
an every day duty. 

One of the memorable achieve- 
ments of the pony express was 
the delivery of Lincoln's inaugural 
address in 1861, when all tho Wes 
tern country was waiting for the 
momentous announcement from 
the capital. The address was hur- 
ried to St. Joseph, Mo., the«'tak- 
ing-off place'' of the pony ex- 
press. Wrapped in oil skin and 
put in saddle bags, the address 
was started on its way amid wild 
cheers. Fresh horses waited at the 
end of every 10 miles, and the final 
10 miles to San Francisco was 
made in 31 minutes. The message 
was carried by the riders a total 
of L,950 miles, in 185 hours, an av- 
erage 1 of , a little more than 
10 miles an hour That was a 
wonderful achievement in those 
days. 

ACCIDENTS EQUAL WAR. 

Statistics Show 80,000 Killed and 
250,000 Injured Last Year. 

Last year dO.OOO were killed and 
250,000 were seriously injured by 
accidents in the U. S. That is 
about equal to our casualties in 
two years of war. It seems incred- 
ible, yet there is no denying the 
facts. The statistics are carefully 
compiled by the National Safety 
Council. If the victories oT peace 
are no less renowned than those 
of war we are learning that the 
casualties of peace are no less 
numerous than those of war. It 
seems to be largely unnecessary 
Where Bafety precautions have 
been adopted there has been a 
great falling off in accidents of 
all kinds. Carlossness lies at the 
basis of most accidents, not gross 
carelessness necessarily,' but often 
merely lack of forethought, fail- 
ure to take prudent precautions 

The work of the National Safe- 
ty Council is to instill into the 
workers of the country, for the 
overwhelming majority of acci- 
dents are industrial, the spirit of 
being cautious about evertyhing, 
also to see that approved safety 
appliances are installed wherev- 
er work is done. Nothing can 
take the place of the personal 
factor. If accidents are to be 
diminished it must be through In- 
dividual men and women taking 
mote. pa.i."",to pr<»- v /ent t*"im. T p 
the use of liquor, even in mod- 
erate quantity, much has been 
charged in the causing . of acci- 
dents. At the end of another year 
assuming a reasonable success in 
enforcing prohibition, we should 
be Better able to judge how 
much of this terrible toll of 
death and injury has been proper- 
ly charged to liquor. Even should 
that prove to be a large element 
il is clear that ignorance and sel 
iishness apl&'lre large elements 
Titos;' a T O I w M to combat, but 
even they can lie made to yield 
lo educational work — St. Louis 
GIovimDc nocrat 

Negro 115 Yeara Old. 

Anna Pi t ' < i negro woman, 
who HaV^ ih< i I H.a>„ of age, 
has beet) officially lilted by a 
iviimi* taker Hi i.< Id 

she win* busy sewhig a* 
told the i iiiuiiiM u ah.' whs 

ii III South < ' ii ollnn ii id 
*otU 15 time* an a *l » it 

"mSiiiinv ' (o fi'J » till > IhI 
mid rati away from tin < nw 
oi.ly to be captured agm.* each 

Hum 



Taxation: What's Coming Next? 

The high cost of government is 
becoming excessive. America needs 
more local taxation and should 
welcome it, but the enormous ex- 
pense required for the operation 
of Federal departments is becom- 
ing tiresome and almost danger- 
ous. 

A subscriber to a newspaper at 
Monesses, Pennsylvania, sent the 
following missive recently in re- 
spone to a "dun'' from the paper 
for his subscription. It is a blow 
against Federal taxation. It is, 
therefore, breezy. 

Here it is: 

''Dear Editor: Your bill for tho 
last subscription received and I, 
for the following reasons, am un- 
j, able to send you a check just 
I now. I have been held up, held 
down, sandbagged, walked on, 
flattened out and squeezed, first 
| by the U. S. government for fed- 
• era! war tax, the excess profit 
tax, the Liberty Loan bonds, the 
capital atock tax, auto tax, mer- 
chants' license, brokers' license 
and by every society and organiz- 
ation that inventive mind can in- 
vent to ej^tract, what I may or 
may not -possess. — 

"The government has so" govern- 
ed my business that I do mot 
know who owns it. I am inspect- 
ed, suspected, examined, re-exam- 
ined, required and commanded so 
I do not know who I amor why 
I am here. 

"All ,1 know is I am supposed 
to be an inexhaustible supply of 
money for every human need, de- 
sire or hope of the human rice, 
and becau se I will not sell all I 
have and go out and beg, borrow 
or steal money to give away I 
have been cussed, discussed, boy- 
cotted, talked to, talked about, 
lied to, lied about, held up, rob- 
bed and nearly ruined, and the 
only reason I am clinging to life 
is to see what in H— is coming off 
next." 



LAST WABNING 

Heavy Fine and Imprisonment 

If You Fail to Get License 

For Your Dog. 



Sheriff L. A. Conner is giving 
the owners of dogs warning as to 
what they may expect in case 
they do not come forward and 
pay the dog tax and secure a 
tag as the law requires. The Ta\ 
Commissioner's books show that 
there is a great many more dogs 
in theycounty than tax is being 
paid on as shown by the tax re- 
cord kept by the county clerk. 
The records of these two offi- 
cials ought to correspond as to 
the number of dogs in the county, 
and it is this big difference that 
the sheriff will endeavor to recon- 
cile. A failure on the part of 
the owner of a dog to comply 
with the law in regard to secur- 
ing a tag for it subjects him to 
a heavy fine and imprisonment, 
and the best for all parties is lor 
the owners of dogs to no forfger 
delay securing a license and 
avoid considerable trouble ana 
may be a heavy fine. A tag can 
be secured without coming to 
Burlington. Mail to the County 
Clerk a description of your dog 
or dogs, giving sex and age, in- 
closing with the description the 
amount of the tax and a stamp- 
ed envelope in which he will send 
you the necessary tag or tags. 

NOTICE TO DOG OWNERS. 

The law requires you to get a 
license for your dog, from th J 
County Clerk, and 'if you fail to 
get the license you are subject to 
a fine not exceeding $100 or im- 
prisonment for not exceeding 
three months, or both fine and 
imprisonment. 

The County Clerks record shows 
that a large number of the dog 
owners have not secured the li- 
cense. » 

The law requires me to enforce 
this law land if you do not license 
your dog, I will be compelled to 
summons those in default before 
the County Judge for their nota- 
tion of the law. 

Deputies will be appointed in 
each precinct, if necessary, to en- 
force the law. Persona harboring 
dogs on their places must licence 
them same as owner. 

The License can be obtained 
from the County Clerk by mail, 
remitting proper fee and post- 
age. 

L A. CONNER, 
Shertr; *>f Boo...» Cou-.^.t 



Frull Should Be Plentiful. 

If a sleet is the forerunner of 
a good fruit crop this part of 
the country will have, t he com- 
ing season, the most bountiful crop 
of fruit in its history This month 
has been noted for the frequent 
sleets— one coat of ice disap- 
pcaring to be followed closely by 
another, consequently there have 
been several periods of dangerous 
and slippery getting sbourt 

Mrs C. A. Fowler burnt the ' " '- 
of her left hand very badly one 
dsy last west with hot grease Sin- 
had tried some meal and wasen- 
deavoring to empty the hoi 
grease out of the skillet in ■> I 
tin can, and in some wa> tlm 
can was tilted and tlu» hoi ffi 
was poured <>u tha i*i*k ol he. 
hand. For several bourt tin" pain 
was excruciating. 

I>n\el Brown, <»f Florence, »i«'nt 
last in Burlington It 

In •M'ldom Iff BmWn Iim'ihih lip- 
old tu*'n With mult a 

visit 



FOOD SHORTAGE WILL 
LAST ANOTHER YEAR 

Next Twelve Months May Be 

The Most Critical Since 

The War Began. 

London— The shortage in pro- 
duction of food caused by the war 
has not yet been made good, and 
is not likely to be in the next 
year, says Chas O McCurdy, Par- 
liamentary secretary to the food 
ministry. 

The wheat crops in exporting 
countries had run down while the 
demand for wheat in the import- 
ing countries was up, he declared 
That was largely due to the fact 
that crops in Central Europe were 
greatly diminished. H> predicted 
that the next year would be the 
most criticals ince the commence 
ment of the war with regard to 
supplies and prices of both but- 
ter and cheese. The dairy product 
of Australia would be much below 
the normal, owing to drought. j 

There was no prospect of the 
world's supplies of sugar .-' beting 
increased, he said. 

As regards meat there was asur 
plus in the country at the pres- 
ent time but it should not be in- 
ferred from this that there would 
be no difficulty as regards the 
meat situation in the coming year. 
In Europe, owing to the ravages 
of war, the meat products would 
be down by about 3,000,000 tons. 
It was evident, he said, that the 
people of Europe, "would not be 
able to eat as much meat as they 
had in the year before the war. 

Mr. McCurdy understood that 
the requisitions from Prance, Bel- 
gium and Italy at present amount 
ed to between 400,000 and 500,0'M) 
tons. He did not see where they 
were going to get it, but it was 
evident that if the peopfe of 
this countryg ot as much meat aa 
they needed they would only have 
if because the rest of Europe 
was hungry and to a large extent 
would be starving. 

At the present time, however, 
there was a glut of meat in Eng- 
land, and during the next two or 
three months it would be arriving 
at a rate at which it would be, 
difficult to dispose of it. There 
was a serious risk of a large pro- 
portion of these cargoes going 
bad owing to inadequate cold stor 
age facilities. 

HEART TOJEART TALK 

Rev. O. C. Peyton, D. D. 
To know how to treat your pas- 
tor is one of the fine arts of 
church membership, and, not ail, 
by any means, have learned to 
practice this fine art. Some are 
real helpers to the pastor. Others 
are a thorn in the flesh to him 
and cause many a weary hour of 
disheartening distress. 

Your paator has been called of 
God to the loftiest service in 
which a mortal can be engaged. 
He needs your loving sympathy 
and hearts cooperation. Give him 
them without measure. Thus you 
will nerve him for his arduous and 
difficult task. Guard his reputa- 
tion! Always talk him up, never 
down. Be ready promptly and ear- 

i nestly to defend him against hurl. 

| fill, malicious attacks. Never hear 

j him spoken against without tak- 
ing his part. His reputation is his 
strength. Guard it lovingly and 
courageously. Appreciate his weak 
work!' If his preaching helps you 
tell him so. He is laboring for your 
spiritual growth. It will strength 
en and cheer him to know- God is 
blessing his efforts. Go to hear 
your pastor! and hear him when 
you do go. Your place on the 
Sabbath day is in the house of 
God. Attending your church is a 
duty. It is, too, a great priv- 
ilege It is a need of your soul. 
Be in your place and beathought- 

jTul, reverent, prayerful listener lo 
the preached word. You should be 
ashamed to be a gazer-about. a 
whisperer, or, in anyway, to de- 
tract from the interest and valu? 
of the services. It demands some 
strength of mind to be a good 
listener. Show that YOU really 
have some grey matter in your 
brain that is capable of sus- 
taining effort. "Take heed how 
you hear,'' is the Savior's com- 
mand. Listen well to your pas- 
tor and you will be blessed. 

I shall speak of some other ways 
to help your pastor. I want to 
stir you to learn and practice the 
fine art of treating your pastor 
oi'sucTt'a s.« io, tho jghtfui, spir- 
itual way as will make you truly 
"a fellow-helper to the truth,' 
your pastor is trying to impress 
on the minds, hearts and lives of 
all the people he serves. 
Union. Ky. 

Bolleview precinct has been hav 
ing its usual run of contagious dis- 
< sses agaifl this winter, scarlet 
fever and smallpox having been 
the prevailing trouble there for 
a few wc<'ks The school stands 
dismissed on account of scarlet 
iWor having appeared in the fam 
ill s uf some of the palronH The 
smallpox has so far been confin 



HANDS MUST BE CLEAN. 

Program for speedy and final 
action on legislation to punish se- 
dition, recommended by A Mit- 
chell Palmer, Atty.-Ger.erai, ana 
passed by the- Senate, has been 
checked by opposition to the 
bill by officials of the American 
Federation of Labor, according lo 
lo members of the House 

Not many weeks ago the A F. of 
L. opened a campaign to drive 
Bolshevist agitators out of its 
ranks. 

The National Labor Journal, of- 
ficial organ of union labor in the 
Pittsburg district, i g etei that 
W. Z Poster had not been deport - 
ed with Berkman and Goldman, 
calling him a dangerous radical 
and a menace to labor. 

How far has the A. P. of L. 
gone in the woik of purging itself 
of agitators'? 

'■The Chicago Federation of La- 
bor has unanimously adopted a 
resolution protesting against the 
deportation of aliens who are 
members of any union affliated 
with the federation, and, under 
the leadership of Foster and Fiti- 
patrick. who brought on the steef 
strike, has resolved to vigorously 
oppose all further attempts to ship 
such undesirables across the sea»" 
says the KeokuJt Iowa, Gate City. 

"But tho Federation of Labor 
has ordy to purge itself of uuch 
Anarchist-, Bolshevists, I W. W's 
as are 'boring from within' and it 
will have no fault to find with the 
Government of the Uniled States 
If it thinks to protect against 
deportation vicious radicals, bom- 
bers, enemies of our institutions, 
who may have wormed their way 
into the federation, it had better 
think again before challenging the 
j Government on this issue. Ameri- 
ca has no use or room for dis- 
turbers of this breed, and no mat- 
ter in what association, organiza- 
tion, society or church they claim 
membership, criminal aliens are go 
ing to go.'' 

Labor can ill afford to lend aid 
and comfort to seditionists in 
times like these. Labor's hands 
must be clean.— New York Tri- 
bune. 



LOCAL SCHOOL CLOSED 

Because of the Appearance of 
Scarlet Fever in the 

Neighborhood. 



Last Monday morning Dr. Yel- 
ton was called to the home of 
Leslie McMulleu, who lives a lit- 
tie over a mile south of Burling- 
ton, to see his children, who 
were complaining. From the de- 
scription of the symptom* given 
him over the 'phone the doctor 
suspected that he would find 
them ill of scarlet fever, the dis- 
ease having appeared in the Belle- 
view neighborhood, several days 
before, and sure enough when the 
sick room was reached three well 
developed cases of scarlet fever 
owaiced his attention. The ioctor 
at once quarantined the home, and 
when he returned to Burlington 
he hastened to notify the store- 
keepers not to allow children to 
congregate in their places of bus- 
iness and requested that parents 
keep their children close at home, 
while at his suggestion the local 
school was cloaed to await the dis- 
appearance of the disease from 
the neighborhood. It is very evi- 
dent that Dr. Yelton has done 
his part to prevent the spread 
of the disease, and there would 
not be much danger along that 
Line was it not that one of Mr. 
McMullen's children who is ill 
was tafcen sick while attending 
school last week It is not known 
where the McMullen children got 
the scarlet fever, and it is sin- 
cerely hoped that it will appear 
in no other family in the neigh- 
borhood, and that those now ill 
of the disease will soon recover. 



ed tn a family ot colored peojllc 
'whojw children contracted the dia 

i iih» in itising sun, where 
aero attending st hool 



IH 

thev 



Icy Items. 

For those who had sleds and 
skates it was "sporting times,'' 
last week, as Tommy Golden, a 
noted Florence character, use to 
say. 

January 1920 may be correctly 
designated as the icy January. 

Everybody cake-walked a few 
days last week, because of the icy 
condition of the sidewalks 

Some of the farmers had a con- 
siderable «uiak "irrying " *ter t" . 
their livestock during the sleets 
the past week, being afraid to 
turn the animals out of the 
barns for fear they would fall and 
injure themselves. 

Boone has not only had rough 
but slick roads the past few days. 

Big Bono Oil Co. Organized. 



A Vory Busy Man 

l»r K W Rylf, veterinary sur- 

ireon, has beau a busy man nino- 

d in IHn liiiglon Me has 

itiutr i bard, time the past fe* 

rath d ll [■ ii,.- rifhl 
right j.l I 



Mr v i: Slater, Jr., of 

ger, has been i i> v t : 11 mi 
taming taases oa a large 
of acres <>f land In 
neighborhood fee the pui . 
«li illing for oil il- h is "i 
a comp iny, w hk< h h 
' eoi porateu, for lb |u i ■■- 

de\ i-liiping th.-> tl 
associated with ! 

ami .ii. i rt >i h ii 

II \U-i k-.hu.-, I- II FAM 
ton Hi fh, '' Si oil t I 
N K Kiddi II \ 

t*' umdi sad " oil U 

III I' 

It II,. I- " 



till 



I i 



! ■»»«/< 



Brian- 

i'i ,>!►- 

number 

uM 
ol 

•d 

m- 

<-r 

hat 

... i 

-, sua 

•■I Will 

. my 

i nun 

Any 

i n" 

,i the 



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^ 



THURSDAY JAN. 29th 1920 



BOONS COUNTY RKCOKDII 



• 



WALTON. 



JMrs. Hattie E. Metcalfe spent 
Suuuay lu v,u. r Iiigton and Cincin- 
t.ati with friends. 

Chaa L. Griffith left Saturday 
for a business trip thru Eastern 
Kentucky and Tennessee. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Reeves, and 
children spent Saturday and Sun- 
day in Louisville with friends and 
relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morris of 
Warsaw, are spending the week 
here with their daughter, Mrs 
Hugh Arnold. 

Mrs. Chas. Denady of Erlanger, 
spent part of the week here the 
guest of her sister Mrs J. Cloyd 
Powers and husband. 

Miss Janie Dickey left last week 
for Iteyetteville, Arkansas, to re» 
sume Her work in charge of a de- 
partment in the college. 

V. P. Kerns was on the sick list 
several days the past week caus- 
ed by a strain in lifting a wagon 
at the tobacco warehouse. 

Arthur Dean spent last week 
with relatives and friends at his 
old home at Moores Hill and Au- 
rora, Indiana. Mrs. Dean who has 
been quite ill is much improved. 

Rev. and Mrs. Howard W. Whit- 
taker and baby spent the first of 
the Week at Erlanger, where Rev. 
Whittaker is pastor of the M. E. 
church and held services Sunday. 

Nathan E. Northcutt has bought 
a jeauiiful $1,000 player piano from 
the Baldon Piano Co, thru their 
salesman Wm. C. Readnour, who 
is doing a fine business for the 
firm. 

Mrs. C. Milton Richey and Mrs. 
E, L, Arnold, of Bloomington, In- 
diana, arrived here last Friday 
on a visit to friends and rela- 
tives. They are delighted with 
their new home. 

Mr. and Mrs Albert Britienhelm 
who are spending the winter ai 
St. Petersburg, Florida, write that 
the weather is ideal afld • they 
are enjoying their sojourn in Fla , 
to the greatest degree. 

Earl Mini ma ii has bought a Ford 
truck with which to do general 
work when he moves with his par- 
ents Mr. and Mrs. Mudmanto the 
farm on Wool per creek which they 
recently purchased from Wm. L. 
Whitehouse. 

Judge B. F. Menefee and Win- 
ston C. Brown of Crittenden, spent 
Tuesday here with friends and 
on business. Mr. Brown who was 
reported missing came back home 
Monday, having been away on a 
business trip. 

R. W. Carpenter spent Monday 
in Louisville on the tobacco mar- 
ket and looking up some ship- 
ments of old tobacco made by the 
Walton Loose Leaf Warehouse Co. 
sold here in November which the 
purchasers rejected. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson Rogers 
were called to Erlanger Tuesday 
by the death of his siBter Mrs. 
Elizabeth Utz, who died suddenly 
at her home there Monday night. 
She was nearly 70 years old. The 
funeral took place from her 
late home Wednesday afternoon. 

W. B. Johnson returned home 
last week from Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, where he was called to at- 
tend the funeral of his sinter 
Mrs. Benj. Vest who^died Jan. 14, 
from hernia, after a short ill- 
ness. The deceased was 45 years 
olfl and was a daughter of Mrs. 
Jane Johnson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett H. Price 
who reside on the Denady farm 
near Richwood, spent part of the 
past week at Lair Station, Harri- 
son county, attending the funeral 
of her mother Mrs. Susan Ann 
Morrison who died suddenly last 
Sunday from heart disease, aged 
64 years. 

The tobacco market at. Walton 
has shown a draggy condition on 
account of the ol/erings being 
chiefly of the commoner kinds 
of tobacco. The Walton Ware- 
house averaged $31.00 per cwt. at 
the sale Saturday and the Far- 
mers Warehouse about the same 
Monday, through the offerings 
were very poor in quaLty 

Capt. Elijah J. Green spent part 
of last week here the guest of 
his brother Robert C. Green, Pres- 
ident of the Waltoj Bank and 
Trust Co., and visited his many 
friends. Capt. Green was in the 
army service and when the war 
was closed located at St. Louis 
where he was given a splendid 
position at the head of a large 
motor company. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Bedinger of 
the Richwood neighborhood, who 
went to Florida a couple of weeks 
ago to spend the balance of the 
winter, are now located at Jensen, 
St. Lucie County, Fla., and send 
their best wishes to their many 
friends here, adding "We are hav- 
ing ideal winter weather; ther- 
mometer ranging from 40 to 80 
degrees, with a pleasant breeze, 
though raining today. 

Earl Beach w'- a has been .dif- 
fering with tuberculosis the past 
year died at the home of his 
parents Mr. and Mrs. John Beach, 
Dec. 20th, aged 27 yeans. He was 
born in Grant county, and leaves 
a wife, sister Miss Ruth Beach and 
his parents. The funeral took 
pl.ee Thursday. The deceased was 
examined for service in the late 
war and was passed as physically 
fit, and shortly afterward showed 
a decline that continued until his 
death. 

Edward 'K Neumeister, T, .1. 
Lay tart and T. J Gentry shipped 
a sot of their tobacco to Lex- 
ington and sold it there Monday, 
one crop averaging H cents nnU 
the other 16 cents. .Some of the 
same quality of tobacco out of 
the same crop sold at the Wal- 
ton Loose Loaf Warehouse fast 
week at 26 cents mid some of to* 
4PMM crop sold at the beginning 
of the seasoo at 39 <*OtS There 
!• so question but thu Walton 
Wrt ae t 1* from two to four cents 
batter than any other market ». 
the State and especially on r*d 



tobacco. It takes the bright to- 
bacco of the best type to reach 
the top prices on the Lexington 
market 

The administrator of the estate 
of James H. Aylor settled with the 
L. & N. Railroad Co. last week 
through their attorney John L 
Vest by accepting $1,000 from the 
railroad company in settlement of 
the claim of Ezra C. Aylor, ad- 
ministrator of J. H. Aylor vs. L. 
& N. Railway Co. for damages sus- 
tained by the death of his fath- 
er James H. Aylor who was killed 
by the railroad at the regular 
railroad crossing in Walton sev- 
eral months ago. The matter was 
considered by the widow and chil 
dren who disliked the idea of lit- 
igation and on the recommenda- 
tion of their attorney the amount 
was accepted as a compromise of 
the matter. 




We are ghrfl to report, improve- 
ment in all the cases of sickness 
in our community. We trust this 
improvement may continue and 
that soon the "shut-ins'' may be 
seen among the regular worship- 
pers at our church services. 

Owing to hindering weather and 
other conditiaoo . our quarterly 
observance of rne ordinance of 
the Lord's Supper was postponed 
and, now, it is probable, we will 
defer its observance until the reg- 
ular quarterly day— the 4th Sun- 
day in March. 

Our Big Bone Secondary School 
is, this session, under the effi- 
cient management, as teacher, of 
Miss Bertha Gardner, of Erlanger. 
It is gratifying to learn that 
everything has moved on smooth- 
ly and to the entire satisfaction 
of all the patrons. This io well! 
Helpful co-operating parents cam 
do much to assist the teacher to 
make the school a success. The 
task of the teacher is arduous 
and trying. Let everybody help, 
as occasion -offers., by words and 
deeds of sympathy and counsel". 
Talk your school up! 

Our Woman's Missionary Society 
is making progress. So far, the of- 
ferings in three months, have 
gone far beyond the entire amount 
contributed in the entire associa- 
tional year of IP19. This is very 
encouraging, as the needs are 
great and, the calls most insist- 
ent. 

Baldon & Hewett have been try- 
ing for several days to locate 
someone to dress the burs in their 
mill at Limaburg, and had about 
given up the search, when, by 
chance they learned that one of 
their near neighbors was an ex- 
pert at that very business. W. R. 
Davrainville, of Burlington, has 
served his time at that work and 
by some means Baldon & Hewett 
discovered that he is the very 
man they were looking for. No 
doubt Mr. Davrainville is the only 
man in this county who can dress 
a pair of burrs properly. 

The weather during the month 
of January has r.ot allowed the 
farmers an opportunity to dispose 
of any of the work that has to 
be done before they can begin 
preparing their lands for this 
year's crops. It now lookd like 
they are going to be behind with 
their work when favorable weath- 
er comes. 



It is surprising the amount of 
mill feeds that are being brought 
to Burlington by the city trucks. 
Scarcely a day passes that one 
or more truck loads do not ar- 
rive, and the farmers are the 
parties who buy it of the local 
dealers. 

Several persons who had not 
heard that Jas. D. Acra's sale ad- 
vertised for last Wednesday had 
been called off, started to at- 
tend it. Mr. Acra is sick and has 
not decided when he will have his 
sale. 

John Clore and .Wilson Gaines, 
of Hebron neighborhood, were 
among the callers'" at this office 
Tuesday. They had started to Jas. 
Acra's sale but learned that it 
had been postponed. 



Hubert Rouse, mail carrier be- 
tween Covington and Burlington, 
missed only one delivery on ac- 
count of the dangerous condition 
of the roads 



Those who take a pleasure in 
attending public sales will have 
about all they can do next week 
if they make the round of safes. 

Onnie Rouse shipped three veai 

calves to market one day last 

week that brought him a few 
cents over $106. 



The local trucks began moving 
tobacco again as soon as the ice 
left *»»e roads #they wen? n<« 
dangerous. 



None of the Cincinnati daily pa- 
pers reached Burlington postof- 
fice in Tuesday morning's mail. 

The Constance school has been 
discontinued on account of the ap- 
pearance of dipththeria. 

The weather the past few weeks 
has been of no benefit to the 
small grain. 

Livestock in this county aeem 
to be in pretty good condition 

Rrank Rouse sent SJ fat hoga to 
murket Wednesday morning. 

Them 1M miid to l.e M-verwi 
pases of flu in thin county 

Although very „,,iili Improved H. 
M Hums »ud wife t>*,i i,,,i r.turm d 

boms Wi'dnuMlny At noon. They 
V*r< »f<q»i>uiK »t * Cincinnati hotel 

On III hi of till* W.,«k. 



mma 

Hft 



■or 



Goodyear Leadership 
and Tires for Small Cars 




Enormous resources and scrupulous care 
have produced in Goodyear Tires for small 
cars a high relative value not exceeded even 
in the famous Goodyear Cords on the 
world's highest-priced automobiles. 



In addition to its larger sizes, Goodyear manu- 
factures an average of 20,000 small car tires 
a day in the world's largest tire factory 
devoted solely to the 30x3-, 30x3y 2 -> and 
31x4-inch sizes. 

Last year more small cars using these sizes 
were factory-equipped with Goodyear Tires 
than with any other kind. i 

Their extreme worth is available for your 
Ford, Chevrolet, Dort, Maxwell, or ofher 
small car, at the nearest Goodyear Service 
Station. Go there for these tires and 
Goodyear Heavy Tourist Tubes. 



30x3% Goodyear Double-Cure $">/>O0 

Fabric, All- Weather Tread V -£U~ 

30x3y2 Goodyear Single -Cure <fc-| tn(,K 

Fabric. Anti-Skid Tread * 1 / ~ 



Goodyear Heavy Tourist] Tubes are built to protect casing*. 
Why endanger a good casing with a cheap tube? Goodyear 
Heavy Tourist [Tubes cost little more than tubes of jt-jgn 
less merit. 30 x'3V4 size in waterproof bag J"~ 




PO STPONE D. 

on account of bad 

I 

weather the sale 



FOR SALE 

Boooe County Road Bands 



The Fiacal Court will receive bids 
for ime purchase of 18 Bonds due 
July, 1888, denominations of 1500.00, 
interest 6 per cent payabable semi- 
annually; also 20 bonds due July, 
1939, denominations $500.00, interest 
6 per cent payable semi-annually. 
No bid will be received for less than 

Ear and acrnde interest. Bids will 
e received for all or any part of the 
said bonds until February 8d, 1920. 
N. E. RIDDELL, Co. Judge 

Boone County. 



E. K. Stephens 

was postponed until 

Friday, Jan. 30th 

Don't forget tho date. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock noon sharp. 



For Sale. 

One Old Trusty Incubator, 240 egg 
size; also one Bell City, 140 egg size, 
both machines practically new — 
,-prlce very reasonable. 

JAH. W. HUEY, Union, Ky. 
Phone, Beaver 40. jan29 4t 



All kins, sizes, prices and terms ; 
$60 to 1200 per acre. 
Write for big list. 

WM. E. OGLE, ARencjr. 
Vevay and Madison, Indiana, 
o feb26, r 



— 



Burlington Lodge K of P>» will 
have work in the first and thirl 
degrees at meeting on Saturday 
tight, Jan. 31st. All member, urg- 
ed to attend. 

The dance that was to have 
been given by Boone Poet No. 4, 
American Legion, at Florence, Inst 
Friday night, wis culled off Inde- 
finitely on account of the bad 
weather. 



Notice. 



Cream reoeivsu again by Mrs. B. 
1 l>. Hie. et MeVille, beglnliigjrrldfty, 
January 8Qth, 1M6. , 

Rev, J. P. Williams, a disting- 
uished divine and an uncle of At- 
torney D B. Caetleman, Dr T. B. 
Caetleman and Mre J. B (lain©*, 
a few da 



died a lew deye a|o at hi. home 
seen dovu ami ^rmw^m e» ^ppiv^^ 



SOWSWEETCLOVER 

BeJ£er than red clover, and f 14 to 
f 18 'per bu. cheaper. Direct from 
grow.r, Unboiled, hulled, and spe- 
cial vearia.da.ed; prompt (Termina- 
tion. I'rlo.s and circulars free. Al- 
so prices on honey, 

JOHN A. HHKKHAN, 
..-in* 14. l> » Faluuiulh.Ky. 



TAEB YOUR COUNTY PAPBR. 



FARM EOR SALE. 

82} acres, goad Tobacco Farm 
located on Frogtown Pike, and 
known as the Snow Farm. 

ELLA ALLISON, 
^ of 18 Walton, K y., R. D. 8, 

Resolutions of Respect. 

Whereas, It has pleased God in 
His infinite wisdom to call home on 
December 9th, 1919, the beloved wife 
of our pastor, R. C. McNeely, there- 
fore be it ' 

Resolved by the members of the 
East Bend Baptist Church, 

That in the death of Sister Mc- 
Neely w« have suffered a great loss, 
and her cheerful presence and help- 
ful council are sadly missed, 

That we extend to Rev. MoNeely 
our heartfelt sympathy «n his great 
bereavement, the loss of his faithful 
companion, 

That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread upon the mliiutua of the 
Church, a copy be sent to llro. Mo- 
Neely, and on. furulNtmd for publi- 
cation In the Hooiih Co. Recorder 
and Wceinrn Recorder. 

W.J. HOTMJEM, Clark. 
Wm. MAY I. on, -proas. 

t Committee. 

> i t MM » ♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦»+♦»♦♦♦♦♦ 
Bubeoribr\for the HBCOKDB" 



ii 



>• 



■*•-» 



fie'i:<af If cappem »f s. 

BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rav. O. C. Peyton, D. D., Pastor. « 
Preaching every Sunday morning 

and evening. , 

Bible School every Sunday at 10 a. 

in.— Sam Allen, Superintendent. 
•0TA cordial invitation U extended 
to all our services. 

Boone Co. Luthoran Pastorato 

Rev. Gko. A. Roybb, Pastor. 
SUNDAY, JANUARY 26tb, 1920. 

Hopeful 10:80 a. m.— Divine serl- 
Vice. 

Hebron— 2 p. in. Divine service. 

Sermon by t lie Pastor at botli serv- 
ices. 

All cordially invited to these serv- 
ices.. 

These services will be'tiie last un- 
til after the vacation during the 
month of February. 

The next service will be the First 
Sunday in March. 

Read the sales in this issue. 






BOONR COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY JAN. 29th 1925 




STOP ■ LOOK - LISTEN 



n 



Next Monday is Ground Hog 
and county court 'day. 



The 1920 wheat crop in 
county will be almost nil. 



this 



R^* . jer the big dance at He- 
bron 'next Friday night, i 



It will soon be moving day with 
a good many citizens of thecoun- 

ty. ■ 

Rev. B. F. Swindler will preach 
at Sand Run next Sunday morn- 
ing and night. . 

Clyde Akin and family, of Belle- 
view, will move to Indiana in the 
next few days. 

Wallace Rice spent last Satur- 
day and Sunday in Burlington 
with' his parents. 

The ice began melting about 
noon last Monday, but it disap- 
peared very slowly. 

By reference to the RECORDER 

\ thia week it will be seen f hat 

there Is a riot of sales on again 

Learning to skate is about the 
best recreation possible, as it 
surely brings into action every 
muscle in the body. 

There will be no services at the 
local Methodist church while the 
pastor, Rev. Jfedingcr, is spending 
the winter in Florida. 



C. C Hughes gavo his chickens 
food in which there was too much 
salt and as a result lost quite a 
number of very fine fowls. 

Mrs. Samuel Adams, of Bullitts- 
ville neighborhood, was taken to 
a Cincinnati hospital one day last 
week to undergo an operation. 



Very few machines took a chance 
on the ice last Friday. The trucks' 
that have been kept on the move 
all winter knocked off for the day. 



.O.G.F. Dance 



At Hebron Hall, 

Friday, January 30, 1920 

§ GOOD MUSIC * 3 

Coronet, Violin, Claronet, Traps 
Saxapbone. 



Come One, Come All, Youfig and Qld. 

''Waltz, Two-Step, Quadrille 

will be the go. 



I 



Zimmer 



COMMITTEE : 

Brown 



Wingate | 





DIRECT DEAUNG PAYS BEST. 

When cream ii ready to sell, the hard work hat been done and you should 
not permit any outsider to make an extra profit off your efforts. 
You can ship your cream DIRECT to the Tri-State and sare from 3 to 
S cts. per lb. of butter-fat. It is just a« easy to deliver the Cream to a rail- 
road station at to a buying station. The Tri-State pays the freight and 
guarantee* your cream against loss in transit. 

Mrs. Tho*. Daulton, Peebles. O., writes on Nov. 25, 1919- "I have shipped 
cream to the Tri-State Butter Co. for three years and have been satisfied. 
I have sold cream to cream stations in order to return the empty Can with 
me, a* I live 1 9 miles from the railroad and always lost from $1.50 to $2.00 
on every can of .cream sold to agents." 



We Pay the 
Freight and 

per pound for butter fat 

week Jan. 26th to Feb. 1 st, inclusive. 



67c 



i 



The Tri-State Butter Co 



CINCINNATI, O. 




CASH CAPITAL $250,000.00. 

If you need cans, write for Free Trial Cans. 

35,000 cream producers find it most profitable to ship direct. 



J 



Last week gave the fireBide far- 
mers a fine chance to cultivate 
their :winte-r crops, and a consid- 
erable acreage of tobacco was 
grown. 

Quite a number of persons in 
Burlington have gotten bad falls 
on the ico tho past week, but, 
fortunately, no ono was hurt ser- 
iously. 

These Boon© county people who 
are basking in Florida's warm sun 
ahine have no idea how much fun 
they are missing in the way of 
delightful skating. 

Charles Hirkle has been having I 
a serious time with an attack of > 
rheumatism in his right arm. It j 
began in the elbow and is now 
in his wrist and hand. He has suf- 
fered greatly at times 

— - m ■ ■ — 

Thomas N. Coons sold his U05- 
acre farm in Clark county, to E. 
L. Fasaett, for $225 an acre, mak- 
ing a clear profit of $10,000 in two 
month's time. This farm is said 
to contain a large percentage of 
real tobacco lanu. 



Harold Gaines arrived from 
Camp Knox, last Tuesday night I 
with the large Kelly truck the I 
Government donated to the coun- 
ty to be used in its road work. I 
The Kelly is said to be about the : 
best truck made. 

Mrs. M. L. Riddell and Clifton 
Roberts will leave next Saturday 
for Washington, D. C, where thev 
have been appointed to position* 
in the pension office. Mr. Riddell 
expects to go CO Washington alia 
in a month or two. 



t 



The flu is epidemic in many of 
the barge cities In this country, 
and there is no telling how soon 
it will become prevalent in the 
country, co»se-|uently i'. behooves 
everybody to take good care of 
themselves, and avoid the diucas? 
if possible. ' 

Th* fenders on one «i<!e of Coun- 
ty Farm Agent Sutton's flivv«jt 
•how plainly that it went up 
against something during the sleet. 
One of tho lamps was put out of 
'commission also. I,t takes some-' 
thing more dangerous than the re- 
rent sleet* to stop Sutton when 
hi haa un appointmoul to meet. 

Ira Ryle, who will move t<> his 
Indiana farm In th* ne-nt f*w 
weeks wuh u caller at this office 
one day Hie past week Ho is unx 
Ions to get located on Ids new 
possession but is nnprohenaive 
thsl Im> will not gtK there before 
the Hist of March Mr Kyle's neigh 
bora Mill '■*' sorry to lose him 
fr<vo their midst hut what will 
thru low will be tome oImi 
oojnimtnU) s gain 



There is some opposition to the 
reelection of Congressman, A. B. 
Rouse, and an effort is being made 
to organize it for the next cam- 
paign with Charlton B. Thompson, 
of Covington, as his opppinent. 
The most recent development 
along that line is the declaration 
of Hon. John J. Howe, Common- 
wealth's Attorney in this District, 
favoring the candidacy of Mr 
Thompson. Claims are being made 
that Mr. Rouse has been showing 
a decline of strength in his recent 
campaigns, from which it is de- 
sired to leave the impression that 
he is C liable to lose the district 
to the Republican candidate at 
the next election. The Recorder 
may be away off in its bearings, 
but it believes that Mr. Rouse will 
make a stronger canvass in Ken- 
ton and Campbell counties than 
Mr. Thompson will, and when it 
comes to the country portion of 
the district Mr. Rouse will doubly 
distance him Rouse's popularity is 
the result of the unremitting at- 
tention he has given the request* 
of his constituents, having proven 
himself a representative whom 
they can approach at any time 
wit h the assurance that they will 
be given proper treatment, and 
th«y want that kind of a man at 
Washington and are not apt to 
exchange, a certainty for an un- 
certainty. 

Quite a number of farmers at- 
tended the meeting held in Bur- 
lington last Tuesday in the in- 
terest of the Farmers' Bureau, and 
the plans and preparation for the 
organization was 7f«ne over pret- 
ty thoroughly. Nearly every pre- 
cinct in the county was ■represent- 
ed in the meeting and theBL*ver.u 
reports in from the canvassers 
thowed that something over -500 
have pledged thomselves to the 
organization. Another meeting 
will I). 1 held on the 7ih of Feb- 
ruary to further discus.* plans, 
etc. There is every indication that 
the ~ »ve for membership will re- 
sult in more than <*ne thousand 
members being secured in thi.i 
county. 

It seems that the organization of 
Farmers Bureau* i'i going forward 
with a rush in hviiy states ana 
numerous benefits are expected to 
be derived thorefrom. 

Please PASTE this in your HAT 
When requesting your Recorder 
changed from onu posioKlce to 
another do not fail to any from 
what office to what oiflee you 
desire the change made You Wttl 
thus often aave conulderable troii 
hie at this end of the line I » 
•ending in money pleat e stele 
whether It Is u n u sttbeevtptioti 
or for renewal. 



(Sfqssifisd Qdu grtigemente. 

For Sale— FRESH MILK~ COWS 
AT ALL TIMES, 

CLAUD CONNER, 
LUDLOW R. D. 2, 
Near Pt. Pleasant church. Boone 
County, Ky aug. 20 

For Sale — Good, large, wo'-'c 

horse 7 years old: a!»io «0 shoaU 

!Ella Allison, Walton R. D. 1 
. . _ 

For Sale— Good horso. Apply t:> 
J. At Eddins or Add Robbin:-,Bu.-- 
I lington. 

i For Sale — Registered tlo'.slcii 
bull. John Westcrman, Lud.ow, K . 
R D. 2. * 



BUY FOR LESS AT 




s - , NORTHERN KENTUCKY'S GEEATEST STORE. 

Seventh and Madison Avenues, Phone S. 5640. 



Think of Buying a 



New Winter Coat 

- Worth up to $29.75 for 

$ 14.95 

They are fine quality, beautifully styled coats for women and 
misses, in smart self-trimmed models. Not a coat in the entire 
lot but is worth $19.75,, and most of them $24.95 and even $29.75. 
Better come quick if you want to share in this most extraordi- 
nary bargain. 

Watch for Announcement of Our Gigantic 

Remodeling Sale 

The most Sensational Value-Giving Event you've known for years. 
It starts Wednesday, Feb'y. 4th. We'll tell you about it next week. 

(Pippin's? • 







WL 



For saie-one rogistered ci, s- Having sold my farm I will offer for sale at my 

residence known as the Watts farm, one mile 
north of Bullittsville, Boone County, Ky,, on 



I'nhllr nalea \mi advertised in 
I he Ueetmler as follows: 
I K HtophMis. Jan 30. 
Lci.lv, Jan SI 
II .Stephens A S 



II l< 



. Jan 



31 



York 
M i 
K C 



i use, 
UlU 
K«th< 

ll,.l*B !•.« 



ft. 



. ... ...... — vhv ivgiBiuim \_u.r»- 

terwhite sow and five pigs. Apptv 
to Raymond Beemon, Florence It 
D. 

For Sale— 7 50-pound shoats. Jot« 
Waltpn, Burlington R. D. 1, near 
; Commissary on Belleview pike. 

For Sale— Good farm team. \V. 
T Berkshire, Petersburg. 

Wanted— Lot of hay of anvkind 
John Walton, Burlington R." D. 1. 

I 

! Kentucky NewsGullens 

v — - ! 

Hopkinsville— Farmers fear that I 
the ice storm will result in the j 
| loss of mout of their wheat crops, ' 
; and that fruit has been 'killed. 

Frankfort.— A register of avoca- I 

i tions shows farmers lead in the i 

; lower House, numbering 36, With 

; 25 lawyers and 10 physicians rank- j 

jng next. Four members arc preach 

era 

Richmond— B. F. and Clyde Puck 
| ley, Lexington, bought the -P5-acre 
jiarm of Nelson P. Giiy atSSfiftper 
acre. 

Maysville— Jacob Roser La Riv- 
ing particular care, to an apple 
tree due to bear this season, be~ 
' cause into the parent stem he 
grafted 17 varieties of appfes. 

Paducah— At a meeting. 27 grow 
eis of the Lamont precinct join- 
ed tho 'tnove to boycott loose loaf 
floors and sell their tobacco only 
at the barn. - 

Lawrencehurg — At a court- 
house meeting, farmers of Ander- 
son county formed «n organisation 
to pool and sell their wool crop 
ihis season. 

Versailles— Newton Rishop pur- 
chased the J M Atvernon farm 
o. J30 acres In Bourbon county at 
1430 jH<r aero. 

PafU The Ki\ Walter Cain, 
aahevllta) N «', will arrlw March* 
i io aaiume the- iiaatorate <>f St. 
tPeter'i &ptscof>aj churtth 

LouisviiU' The revenue office 

has I teen attumpeil \Mllt phyMrtan* 
>•( eking the mCMU flf permit 
fore <he> run | nBcilhc whink> 
Somerset- The Bottthrrn Kal<- 

« #v in eontrmpUtlnj »ertiee 

hing 1 * Mountain i"<\\> ' ' 
mhihI'i nittai niMAtitla ' and 

using i CUt 

the valley n •U* 



WEDNESDAY. FEBY W, 1920 

The Following Property towit: 



Horses, Cows, Hogs, Etc. 

Several head of Horses, 3-yr. old Reg- 
istered Shorthorn Bull— this is a real 
shew Bull. Red Cow with calf by her 
side, Black Cow and call, 8 Jersey 
Cows — 4 fresh with calves by their 
side and 4 will be fresh by March 1st. 
1 Jersey H~' r - * Jtogtsterd Duroc 
Sow with 6 pigs, 3 Duroc Sows that 
will farrow by March 4th. 4 Thinrind 
Sows to farrow in February, 5 Sows 
with pigs, 12 Shoats that will weigh 
100 pounds each, 12 Shoats that will 
weigh 50 pounds each, black Sow and 
8 shoats. 



Farming Implements. 

McCormick "Wheat Binder, McCor- 
mick Corn Binder, Corn Planter Wheat 
Drill, Mowing Machine, 2 Riding Cul- 
tivators, two Breaking Plows (Oliver 
Chill) 3 single shovel plows, Disc Har- 
row, Smoothing Harrow, Hinge Har- 
row, Hay Rake, Wagon and Haybed, 
i Stock 'uaSd, 2-ho*se Sleu* 2 Sp t rf»g wag- 
ons, three sets work harness, check 
lines, collars, bridles, Carriage, Double 
Carriage Harness, one Buggy, Corn 
Sheller, Cutting Box, Pitch Forks, two 
ladders, chicken coops, Cream Separ- 
ator, new Milk Cooler, Milk Cans, Coal 
Oil Stove, 3 Heating Stoves, 4,000 To- 
bacco Sticks. 



; 



/ 



/ 



\ 



, TERMS OF SALE. 

On all sums ot $10.00 and under, cash; over that amount a credit ot six months will be 
given purchaser to give note negotiable and payable at Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, 
Kentucky. Terms must be complied with before removing property. 

J. M. Eddins, Auct'r 
Hubert Conner, Clerk. 



M. E. Wilson. 



SALE TO BEQ1N AT 13:30 OCLOCK 




titgtwmM 



iiiiiiMMiiiiiiniiwiiHiM 



aHMBdHnmnafi 



«Ms.\tMmmt^t 



KM:-^:igm» 



mim 



asm/am 



5Tmrtf3ay, January 2!> 1920. 



oUONE COUNTY RECORDS* 



\ 



BURIED EMPIRES. 



antiquity 
Here, it is said, ie-> clear evidence 
of a civilization which smtodates 

tat of Egypt, <m!' which makes of 
i he civilizations of Babylon and 
Tyre comparatively rocfjit events. 
Tne world will await with inter- 
est the story of its records. These 
tales of mon union si and tombs, of 
strange writings, deciphered by 
the scientists, have put usin touch 
with the life of hoary centuries; 
have galvanized, so to speak, the 
men and womem of the ancient 
days until they move and speak, 
love and strive, then .pass to 
their appointed nlacea 

It is interesting in this connec- 
tion to fearn from a distinguish- 
ed professor of Assyriofogy. of 
Oxford, England, that a new tab- 
let places the blaiw for the fall 
of man on the sturdy shoulders 
of Noah According to (he tablet 
Noah was ordered by the Lord not 
to eat of the fruit of the cassia 
tree— as though anything would 
want to !— and because he objected 
to prohibition, and did oat, the 
curse of ill health fell uiion him, 
and. instead of living to ithe ripe 
old age 50,000 years, h" tiled after 
having lived a paltry few cen- 
turies. 

The scientist insists that this 
tablet was writ tun 5,000 years ago, 
and that it evidently records a 
tradition which goes back to the 
very early history of man. 

We eannO't dispute ihis author- 
ity. As a matter of fact we do 
not wish to do so. We are g£a»t 
that we have this belated exonera- 
tion of our slandered first parents. 
Adam may have been a gentleman 
after all; and we always have 
contended that Eve was every- 
thing a glorious first creation 
should have been. 

Noah's reputation justifies the 
suspicion at least that he may have 
been the first sinner. 

However, we are inclined to be- 
lieve, notwithstanding the ■ evi- 
dence of the Assyrian tablet, that 
man has been falling upward ever 
since God placed ham here on 
earth. The best man of today is 
a better man than ever was any 
dream-Adam Aspiration, guided 
by love and mercy, has be?n lift- 
ing man through" all the ages 
Bince he rose from groveling be- 
fore the dark shapes of fear and 
superstition and felt in his bur 



Advantages and 

Profits in Sheep. 



under 



Recent wonderful archaeological 
- in Africa once more 
i impress u- with the ma- In the right hands an! 
jeslv <>i civilization's antiquity, proper management, sheep .ire vo 

ct ; : clify very profitable stock to keep, 
and profit is the important point 



of any industry. Farmers are not 
carrying on their work for health 
or pleasure. 

It has been found and fully 
proven that sheep will weaken 
the soil least and improve it more 
by pasturing of any farm stock. 
They are great enemies of weeds, 
and. robbing the soil 'of this pest, 
they do not rob it of its fertil- 
ity, but rather add thereto. 

Like other farm animals, thev 
must hape some pare, but of ail 
stock os the farm they require 
as little attention and at a time 
when other work is quiet. There is 
another point in favor of the 
j sheep business that is quite a 
! factor with some, and that is the 
I comparatively small amount oi 
i capital required to start the bus- 
; iness. At this time prices are 
higher than usual, but even at 
I that several sheep can be purchas- 
ed for the cost of one cow. The 
returns are quick and large. 
Lambs, wool and mutton are the 
products of the flock, giving 
! three chance.-* for success, and 
'sheep are the quietest and eas- 
iest to handle of any farm ani- 
mals if the work is done in the 
I proper way. Good fences are one 
j special requirement which some 
farmers do not have. 

There is another advantage in 
j the management of sheep not to 
j be found in any other stock, and 
that is, they aie usually kept with 
the aid of very little grain. They 
will do well on good; pasture 
through the Bummer and on plen- 
ty of the right kind of hay dur- 
ing the winter, while other farm 
animals require a considerable 
amount of grain during the cold 
weather and some in warmer 
weather. The profits in keeping 
sheep, are, of coures, governed 
by the cost of production, by 
the use of fodder and straw, the 
coarse food which will bring 
practically nothing in the mar- 
| ket. The manure produced from 
! sheep, both summer and winter, 
I is far more valuable than that of 
j the cow or the horse. Hence this 
: is no small item. Another point 
I that determines the profits on the 
j flock, and this is the 



geoning soul the divine impulse i J^* "on "which they a^elcept 
to praye r and faith. I Somo farms ar& hmy> ' stony a £ n 

■ . ' rocky, much of the land being 

The Case ofJMr. W.instein. \^^^ e b ^%J^ HEX 

JvefnS^ V £?• ft S °,' i0t 1 -itX k To P r in a g n v*Z&T'- 
government of Russia ,s speodtegr T f armin - So wluIc theTP 




/""JET some today! 
^^ You're going to 
call Lucky Strikes 
just right. Because 
Lucky Strike ciga- 
rettes give you the 
good, wholesome 
flavor of toasted 
Burley tobacco. 

Guaranteed try *fj£^ 



• *•■••**«#> 



sted 



hardly 
kind of 



i' n .. nn „ » _r " "° ' larming. So while there is orotic: 

of overturning our Government. g§ ^^ then\ on a g ro^gh, 
Gregory Weinstem, cnief lieuten hilly Tarm, considering the' 

ant to Martens, Soviet "ambassa- amount invested 

dor,'' was arrested the other day i — 

•as a result of the effort of the 

Departme nt of Justice to clean up 

"red'' plotters in the U. S. The j 

worst that could have happened j 

to Weinstein would have baen to 

be sent back to Russia. 
But the worst did 



After 20 Years New 

Revenue Law. 



not happen. 



Small boats loaded with goods 
belonging to other people should 

WeinatefcT ap^led'to "he" courts I )£*? J&S, *? K 8h °£ *"* & *° 
for protection a£d presently was > case sho « ld . they be maimed 
released on baiL /And noW he is 



by 
an untramed crew. After two de- 



to testify with much pomp and 
circumstance, we, aunpose, before 
a committee of the Senate. 

In Russia, under Soviet rule, 
they have a deferent wav of 
handling things'.! n that country, 
during the past two years, tens 



cades, during which two special 
committees composed of men of 
brains and experience, studied the 
tax laws of other states a revenue 
isw was framed and passed by a 
special session of the legislature 
after months of deliberation and 



of thousands of ,*rsons have been I c f e A uI t K h ^ u « fht u by ^e members 
shot on the charge of counter- °„ f th £ hod £' whos? , ah «"ty *« 
revolutionary activity. Some of : & a 5?,Y e th , e JL VB ™ (p : and , w ^ h 
them really were counter revolu- i dvice " of 

tionaries. More were innocent of 



hist business men and of finan- 
ciers of the state, we have the 
present revenue laws, which are 
; being copied by legislative bodies 
of other states, and laws, which 
if allowed to -stay upon the 
statutes of Kentucky, will cause 
her to blossom as the ro.«e, her 
roads to be rebuilt and her 
schools to be revised and her 
state tax rate to diminish grad- 
ually to nothing Just why a law 
that is producing such good re- 
sults should be tampered with we 
fail to see. We will say this that 
ed of food, "political" rights, 'per-! th ^- bod » v that repeals "this law 



any action against the Soviet auth 
orities. The long list of viotims of 
"mass terror'' includes aristocrats, 
professional men, manufacturers, 
small shopkeepers and peasants A 
clear majority of the entire num- 
ber, however, were not represent- 
atives of the "bourgeois'' classed i 
at all, but Socialists who belonged ! 
to other schools of socialism than ! 
that supported by the present die- | 
tators of Russia. 

In Russia those who oppose the ! 
government, passively, are depriv- 



YOUR LAST CHANCE 

To Get Government Land In 
Minnesota Under a Special 
Homestead Act at $6.25 Per 
Acre. 

Indian reservation homestead 
lands under Act of Congress pass- 
ed 1918. No improvements, res- 
idence or cultivation required. 
Long growing season, plenty of 
rain, no crop failures, good roads, 
churches and schools. The land 
will grow any crop that other 
land will grow, and more of it. 
This price covers payment for 
the land to the Government, in- 
cludes all entry fees, two years' 
taxes and our services. Don't de- 
lay if interested. Call or address 

Minnesota Homestead Co. 

Suite 315 Tribune Annex, 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN 

—Adv. 



Satisfactory Glasses 




Our glasses' are comfortable when 
fitted, and we keep them so for you 
free of charge. Any time they get 
bent or out of shape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 



DR. N. F. PENN, 



Phone South 1746 

WITH MOTIIH, J»wet«r. 

613 Madison Ave. - Covington. Ky 



* LUTE BRADFORD 

-♦AUCTIONEER- 

Is well posted on prices, has a wide acquaintance and 
knows all the good buyers. 

Live Stock Sales a Specialty 

Can Give all the Reference You Want. 
Farmers Phone. 

L FLORENCE, KY., 



TERMS'REASONABLE 

R. D. 




aonal liberty. Those against whom 
there arises even the fainltest »uh- 
piction of active hostility are de- 
prived of life. In this country 
those who plot againaA the Gov- 
ernment in ninety-nine eases out 
of a hundred aro not interferred 
with. If they are arrested, they 
have an appeal to the counts and 
usually manage to he released on 
one ground or another. 

It must all seorn very amusing 
to Mr. Weinatein I 



will sign its own death warrant. 
Now is the time, during this era' 
of prosperity, to redeem the coun 
ty and the state from debt, and 
to build up our roads and our 
schools, and we dare any milk 
ami cider bunch to pass any laws 
to the contrary. Give the co'untry 
districts a show— Owen Co. Dem- 
ocrat. 



The "Matter With" America. 

What's the matter with America 
these days? 

Too many diamonds, not enough 
alarm clocks. 

Too many silk «hirts, not enough 
blue flannel onea. 

Too many pointed-t<>p»i Bhoes, 
and irot enough aqua red-toed 
ones. 

Too many serge suits and not 
enough overalls. 

Too much decollete and no; 
enough aprons 

Too many aatin-tiphoKrrod lim- 
ousines and not enough rown. 



an I 



and no 



Too many eonsmnora 
enough producers. 

Too much oil stock 
enough savings accounts 

Too much envy of the NMMtftt 
of haid work ana too little desire 
to emulate it. 

Too many desiring nhorl cuts 
to Wealth and 'too few Willing tO 
pay the pries* 

Too much of the aptri! of ' ;j> : 



Landmarks of Holland 

Rapidiy Passing. 

Amsterdam, Jan. 4. — Holland is 

.slowly hut surely losing the one 

characteristic of its fandscapo 

made famous In art and known to 

every schoolboy— the squat, fat, 

lazy looking windmills that for 

centuries have stood out all over 

the country's flat servic These 

quaint structures are gradually 

fgr'ring way to higmf practical hut 

1 ugly st. -am and electric plants. 

.Dutch technical men sat the wind 

• mill is doomed. Now and then a 

I laige group of them is re placea 

; by one electric plant, and, in the 

j cours" of each year, a niiinlH>rare 

Btroyed by fire— presenting a 



not j s p ec ta c ular blaze with the Ug 
burning wings wheeling around 
tike fiory a"rhii They are never 
reconstructed, The existing type 
-11 Dutch windmill was inventea 

about the year 1100 The great 
disadvantage of th,. windmill, of 

course, la its absolute dependoncu 
on weather conditions JFor this 
reason thi y ar • 1 eina 1 nplaceo 



Sheriff's Sale for Taxes. 



Notice is hereby given that I, or 
one of my deputies will, on Mondav, 
February 2nd, 19*0, it being County 
Court day, between the hours of 10 
a. in. and 8 o'clock p. m. at the Court 
House door, in the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., expose to 
public sale for cash in hand, the fol- 
lowing property, or so much thereof 
as may be necessary to pay State, 
County and School tax due thereon 
and unpaid for the year 1919, and the 
penalty, interest aud costs thereon. 

For a complete description of prop- 
erty see Assessors Book for the as- 
sessment for 1918, at the County 
Clerk's Office: 

L. A. CONNER, 
Sheriff Boone County. 

Florence Precinct. 
Cleek, Albert, town lot. ~.\n 

Constance Precinct. 
Ziinnier. B. F., town lot 0.86 

BodittsvlMe Precinct. 
Anderson, K. M. n r town lot 8.77 



W- A - N -T 

Beech, Sycamore, 



tt'lirll pOI ilbll 



I, 



modem 



h 



while the getting la good*' snd nol Ichlnery Tie- Du, 
enough of the, .l«l ta »li ion 1 1 hrialever much it n 
tisnliy I in i»' a toj , 1 

Too much <Ih >u,y r tint m , lipdy atruotur 

itself In ineue complaining and good sued houno and (I, 
loo I lie real ©IfoH to reined > cr> inside n entremelj 

greal mans 

1 nf fho mini 1 



enmlilUma 

.. <*Oh fltM* eonaclou ■ 
and too UUIe common I. m • 



and k>ve of 
U, Kurum 



htiiiifi ii 1 1 % 1 



rem 

.1 !!»'» 1 1 



ma 

lllllll. llOW • 

m pictures 

n'lial It 

1 > lag M a 
muehin 
powerful 
ot tin in 

alien 

1 11 nol >■•< (>n u<« 

the 1 ii-il 1011 <i| 

nullum unoYi ( ikuii 



- E - D 

Maple, 
and Walnut Logs. 

nny to sell write to 
C. C. MENGEL & BRO. CO. 
LotjtyUle Kentucky 



Oak 

If you Imvc 



Lebanon— W. K. V'owolla is dis- 
playing a watermelon which he 
buried in hav Sept I and in prime 
condition He declares any fruit 
or vegetable may be preserve I m 
lik«' manner 

Madison vil|e A yellowed page 

in the family Bible examinee by 
Di w L Moore, hui.ports th- 
claim <d Daniel Pord, who died at 
Manniiigloii, that be was tit 
\ 1 ais old 



V ersaitles W 
fat in t> 

Mf Hi ii' 



II 



Hill 



Mold hla 

!• lit 



Hi 



Tobacco Growers 

^^Bafore Purchasing 
Your 

TOBACCO COTTON 

Come In and See 
Our Line 

The LUHN & STEVIE Co. 

(Incorporated) 

a The *tore Th»«. Saves You Money. 

28-30 Pike St. Covington, Ky. 



Hi 



F. W. Kassebaun k hi 

6R1NITE & H ARBLfi 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large Stock on Dtepby Q 
f to 8«Uct from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipment 

US Main &tro*t, 

AURORA, IND. 



i 




•••••••••••••••••••••••••a 

j 

• 

: 

: 
: 



Sales and Service 



19 E. Seventh St., 

COVINGTON, KY., j 

CLYDE BARLOW, 

General Manager. * 

••••••••••••••••••••••••a* 



D. E. Ca8tleman t 
ATTORNEY AT LA W, l 

-Office over— 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlangtr, - Kentucky. 

WANTED 

Boone County farms to sell. Ad- 
dress W. E. VEST, 
First Nat. Bank Building, 

Qovinqton, Ky 

JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohan Building 

Pike Street Covington, Ky. 



While Oak Stock Farm 




now has on hand April farrowed pigs 
both sexes; will bo ready for ship- 
ment when 8 to 10 weeks old. These 
are the Big Bone and Binooth type, 
the kind that makes the show hog. 
PriceB Reasonable— ^Pedigrees Free. 

FRANK HAMMOND, 
R- D. 1, Florence, Ky. 

Con. Phone 229. una 8tf 



A FAMILY 

MEDICINE 

In Her Mother's Home, Says Toil 
Georgia Lady, Regarding Mack- 
Draught. Relief From Head- 
ache, Malaria, Chills, Etc 



Ringgold, Oa. — Mrs. Chas. Gaston. 
of this place, writes: "1 am a user 
of Thedford's Black-Draught; In fact. 
It was one of our family medicines. 
Also in my mother's home, when I 
was a child. When any of us child- 
ren complained of headache, usually 
caused by constipation, ' she gave us 
a dose of Black-Draught, which would 
rectify the trouble. Often In the 
Spring, we would havo malaria and 
chills, or troubles of this kind, wa 
would take Black-Draught pretty reg- 
ular until tho liver acted well, and 
we would soon be up and around 
again. We would not be without It, 
for It certainly has saved us lots of 
doctor bills. Junt a doso of Black- 
Draught when not so well saves a 
lot of days In bed." 

Thedford's Black-Draught has been 
In use for many years In the treat- 
ment of stomach, liver ° and bowel 
troubles, and the popularity which It 
now enjoys Is proof of Its merit 

If your liver Is not doing its duty, 
you will suffer from such disagree- 
able symptoms as headache, bilious- 
ness, constipation, indigestion, etc., 
and unless something is done, serious 
trouble may result 

Thedford's Black-Draught has been 
found a valuable remedy for these 
troubles. R is purely vegetable, and 
acts in a prompt and natural way, 
regulating the liver to Its proper 
functions and cleansing the bowels of 
Impurities. Try It. Insist on Thed- 
ford's. the original and genuine. B 7| 



PRIVATE SALE 

of Furniture consisting of 

1 living room Suite of Davlimtte 
Chair, Rocker and Library Table 
in Walnut, upholstered in genuine 
brown leather. New 

I Dining Table and ('haira in Jaeo- 
liettu finished Oak. , New. 

I Hoyal Milton Rug tU12. New. 

1 Prtetad Miiinn Bug Quit. N«w, 

It) >arda Linoleum. N.«w. Never 

heart ua<<l. 
I M.-drooiM Hulte Oak. 

Corns and ae<> them 

I I- <\MON, 
lugton I'lkf, Klstnara), opposite 
Mra (Meok's. 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All Calls Promptly Attended. 

Twenty -one years Practice. 
Phoqe 733 WALTON, KY. 

+«M« •♦•++♦++•♦■++♦**++♦♦'«•%•»• +++-K 
« HB A UO08T8R 1 ^a 

« TrvADK AT MOMB I ♦ 

• TAKM'iHI BOHM PAPIMI* 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Ne£d Ft 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



a— 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



e ex 

# IMPORTANT NOTICE. ♦ 

# Watch the date following a 

# your name on the .margin ♦ 
e of your paper and if it is ♦ 
e not correct pleuae notify a 
a this office st once. If your a 
a paper has been discontinu- a 
a ed by mistake before your a 
a time expired do not dVluy a 
a notifying thia office. All cr- a 
a rora art* cheerfully corrett- a 
a ed here. . a 

a i * 

eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

Hulacrlbr for the U MtuUU. 






Hi 






tffrURSDAY JAN. 29th 1923 



EOONB C.a.rTv t?ECOPDE1T 



Wo. 5 



A 



V 



The water has backed up in 
Woolper creek and froze over. 

Read She-riff Conner's proclama- 
tion in regard to invtaggod dogs. 

The Tax Commissioner rf»poft- 
ed 1,200 dogs in Grant county 
while only 650 are carrying liccn*2 
tags. _ 

There is a large quantity of 
rook being gotten out of the quar- 
ry on the Constance hill by the 
county road men. 

*~ am ,< 

A room has been prepared in 
the High fichool building for Miss 
Mattie Kre>U-.. to "*M& Instruct- 
irg her class in Expression. 

A good cow belonging to James 
Kyle, who resides down on Gun- 
powder creek, fell on the ice a 
few days ago and received injuries 
from which she died. 

SALESMEN WANTED to solicit 
orders fo- lubricating oils, greas- 
es and paints Salary o. - Commis- 
sion. Address THE HARVEY OIL 
CO., Cleveland, Ohio. 



Very little business was trans- 
acted by the lural population the 
past week, it being difficult to 
do more than provide for live- 
stock and to keep the home fires 
burning. * 

The Recorder is under obliga- 
tion to Roy Clutterbuck, of Los 
Angele*, California, for a copy 
of the Mid Winter edition of the 
Los Angeles Times.- it was a hum- 
mer, sure. 



Judge Gaines went to Williams- 
burg last Monday to close up 
some court business he had on 
hand there, and next Monday he 
will begin his February term In 
Williamstown. 



Ed. Rice is organising a farm 
bureau of his own on a small 
scale. Tim Sandford is his local 
lieutenant, and tobacco will be 
the principal crop cultivated by 
the members of the bureau. 



The paper on which the Recor- 
der is now being printed is label- 
ed "made in Canada.'' The paper 
proposition is growing more ser- 
ious with the country papers as 
the weeks pass, and the future is 
somewhat gloomy to say the least. 

The carriers on the rural routes 
made a start from the local o."- 
fice last Friday morning but they 
did not go far before they dis- 
covered it was fool hardy to un- 
dertake to make the entire deliv- 
ery and returned to the postof- 
fice. ^^ 

Livestock has been entirely help 
less in this section the pant two 
weeks on account of the Bleat that 
covered the ground and made it 
dangerouB for quadrupeds as wed 
as for man to get about. Ani- 
mals had to be waited on like 
babies almost. 



The school children were the 
only ones who enjoyed the sleet. 
They nearly all had skates and 
made good use of them going to 
and coming from school. Who 
will say there is not more pleas- 
ure in school days than anyother 
period of life? 

Bert Rouse and wife are the 
most successful tobacco grower3 
in this neighborhood. He cultivat- 
ed 1,700 plants of tobacco the past 
season for which he got $360, while 
his wife cultivated 300 plants that 
made a still better amount of 
money in proportion to quantity. 



Carl Cason, Burlington and Bel- 
leview mail carrier* had a strenu- 
ous trip last Friday. His machine 
wanted to get into every ditch 
and fence corner between Belle- 
view and fiurlington, but Carl 
stuck to the wheel and finally 
rounded in at the Burlington of- 
fice with everything in good or- 
der. 



fFEBRUARY'To, 1920* 

! PU BLIC SAL E. 

Having* sold my farm, I will ^iex, at pub- 

lie auction, at 1 o'clock p. m., at my farm 

On the Beaver Lick and Rich wood 

pike, 2 1-2 miles from Eichwood, 

the following property : 

I Live Stock and Farm Implements, Etc. 

41 CU^^^x O Pn,.m K^tU -^.,'11, .'.-.^ O r^.^.^^1„_„ 0«.~~1 t3„__ „1 1 1 ■ ■- • c 



31 Sheep, 2 Cows— both milking, 2 
Horses, 1 Pony, 2 Mules, 1 pair Mules, 
4 brood Sows to farrow in March, 
2 1-2 sets Work Harness, set Buggy 
Harness, 1919 Ford Touring Car, 2 
Tarpaulins, Tobacco Canvass for two 
beds, 3 burner Oil .Stove, 50-gallon 



Gasolene Steel Barrel, 1 barrel Spray- 
ing Pulp, 1-2 bushel Clover Seed, 1-2 
bushel Alfalfa Seed, 1 new Barrel 
Churn, 1-3 interest in Grain Drill, 1 T 3 
interest in Scalding Box, 1 Concrete 
Roller, 4x4 and 4x6 Framing Timber, 
Log Chain and numerous other articles. 



L 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10 and under, cash; on all sums over $10 a credit of 
six month will be given^purchasers to give notes with approved se- 
curity payable at Equitable Bank and Trust Co., Walton, Ky. 
3 per cent discount for cash. 

COL W. B. JOHNSON, 
Auctioneer. 






Falmouth Implement i Furniture Co. 

S P EC I ALl 

Come to Falmouth, Ky., and Save the Difference! 

Just received a car of. Brown Wagons and a car of Birdsell 

Wagons. This shipment was bought some time 

ago ahead of the advance in prices. 

Brown Wagon, 3 inch skein, 2 in. x 5-8 in. tire $140.00 

Brown Wagon, 2% in. akein, 1 l A in. x 5-8 in. tire $130.00 

Birdsell Wagon, three weights in 2}i and 3 in. skein, 

Price $140.00, $145.00 and $15000 

Also a variety of John Deere Farm Machinery. 

Falmouth Furniture & Implement Company, 

Falmouth, Kentucky. 



The World's Debt to Britein. 



A Man Shall Reap as 
He Sows 

It's poor judgment to put low grade seed into 
the ground and expect to get a great big 
bumper crop. 



More babies w*re born in Lon- 
don, last week than in any corres- 
ponding week this century. TbO 
registarar general gives the total 
as 2,676. A medical expert has ex- 
plained that there has always 
been an increase of births after 
great wars, although it was hardly 
expected that this would prove 
true in England now, in view of 
the great number of men killed 
and disabled. 

B. H. Scranton of this city ha* 
been elected president of the In- 
diana State Dairy Association. The 
honor is of considerable cignifi- 
cance and Rising Sunners will take 
pride in the fact that it came 
to a Rising Sun man. Mr. Scran- 
ton has for eeveral years been in- 
terested in dairy matters, and on 
his farm just above town are 
some of the best pure bred Jer- 
seys to be found in the Ktatu — 
Rj*in-,- Bun New* l 



Vice Admiral William S. vSims 
1i3h u rather uncomfortable fie- 
■ ulty of once in so often blowing 
an entire administration out of 
the wator. He did it 1 1n* first 
time when Theordore Roosevelt 
"was President, and Sims called 
attention to certain foscilised con- 
ditions in tlu> American navy. Let 
it be known that the gunners 
couldn't shoot for )>eana anl that 
battleship construction wbb on so 
shamefully obsolete a pattern that 
tht* very acmi» of vulnerability had 
been attained, Whereuoon Theo- 
dore Koosovelt, after the fashion 
thai «haraoteri/.id him, threw a 
ducklit and began to turn things 
upside down Sims ut that lime 
look In* huppv chances on, draw 
hiK a lutfh wise in a eon .•■m.ir- 
but 'hf >r«rt uwsv with it, and 
I tie iiliuke Up th%t followed ill the 
k .. . dygjafjunctit was aLUi-v" 

•iHWWHrit brought I.e. Sims 

partisans 10 ths forT* and in one 

»»V or another they k"|rt preitv 

I t « • u « i it the fore mil it the 

Ilanlela iftglitto 



SATISFACTION 

It is worth a great deal to you to have a feeling 
of perfect satisfaction about the manner in which 

your financial business is handled* 

i 

Let us take care of 'your business and you be 
the judge as to whether or not it is properly 
handled. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

Capital $30,000. 
Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) $50,000 

We have a few more Farmers Account Books 

for distribution among nur patrons. 

CALL FpH ONE. 



Without minimizing Tn the feast 
degree the credit due heroic 
France for her part in the fate 
war, or that of brave Belgium, 
steadfast Italy, or unselfish Amer- 
ica, it should be remembered that 
Britain's Grand Fleet made im- 
possible Germany's dream of con- 
quest and expansion. Well in- 
deed has this mighty force, which 
operated to insure the perpetuity 
of civilization, been called "the 
keystone of the arch of the al- 
liance of the allies >' 

The story of the Grand Fleet 
is an epic romance. It patrolled 
by day and by night the seas 
which Germany insolentiy and 
confidently , decalred the allies 
wotrid not flare to face. By this 
grim ocean esnpiry 79,000 ships 
were safely convoyed. Because of 
it the blockade was made effec- 
tive, and it was the blockade 
rather than bayonets and bullets, 
mighty guns and avenging mil- 
lions of armed men, which brought 
imperial Germany to her knees a 
broken nation. 

From Cape Wrath to Greenland 
rode these grSy guardians over 
the wiUJest seas, ever ready, 
ever watchful, and, like satellites 
attendant upon major planers, 
small craft of all kinds patrolled 
21,000,000 miles a year and killed 
the boasted, pride of ruthless Ger 
many, the submarine. 

According to recently published 
authority mine sweepers operat- 
ed over 500,000 square miles each 
year of the war. Dull statistics 
can never tell the tale of hero- 
ism and sacrifice included in the 
activities of the Grand Fleei. for 
five perilous years of war. 

While the English fleet rode 
the waves the fate of civilization 
was in the balance. Had storm or 
accident or treachery destroyed 
its efficiency Germany would 
have won her heart's desire, the 
world would have become subject 
to the rule of the Teuton. It 
was not to be. . The Master of 
storm and wave and human hearts 
willed that liberty should not go 
down under the heel of brutal 
despotism. England's Grand Fleet 
rode the waves and to that fleet 
chiefly does the world' today owe 
its salvation.— Enquirer. 




CSKMCHJKXSXHCSKfca 



Two Iford Touring Cars in good condition, 
good tires; one has shock absorbers and 
demountable rims. Will sell cheap if sold 
this month— will sell one or both at a bar- 
gain. GOODE MOTOR CO., 

3ZF c —^Uv Street, 
Phone S. 5793. Covington, Ky, 



Sickness anion? children and 
baa weather during the winter 
months make very much against 
the progress of the country 
schools and are a strontj argu- 
ment in favor p» subsii. tiling a 
winter vacation 10V the summer 
vacation. Instead of having no 
'schools truu.. fe ..,<•- / »hw 1 rrfhs of 
June, July and August there 
should be none .during the months 
of December, January and Febru- 
ary, thereby escaping the bait 
weather of the winter as well as 
the sickly season. The months of 
June, July nnd August furnish 
good weather and there is no sick- 
ness of any moment among chif- 
dren. But some- say the weather 
is too hot to hive the children 
confined in the school room dur- 
ing the summer weather, hut ihe 
hoi weather of the summer is not 
as objectionable .is such weather 
as hus prevailed her- the pail 
month- rain, hoo.v snd .le.-i, mak 
ii g it almost im) o [I I " foi I '.ich 
ers or pupils t*> reach the Bchool 

poem \Vtni« eon. lit i tppl'< 

the schools i'i • h " emit i \ !.» ■ ■! It 
sn extent .ir. lo iii teach- 

er, pupil ami it • n( lit - 1 1 oubl • 
can, and shmil I, be r( << ln-il \>f 

changing the VHcation months to 
wiutei inoiiiha 



The chaff and inert matter of *«***. i 
fall in a place where good seed might well 
have fallen, and money, land, time and en- 
ergy are wasted. 

Plant Only the Best 
of Seed. 

Give your land at least a square deal in the 

matter. 

We offer high tested, pure, clean, seed for 
immediate delivery. 

TIMOTHY, REDCLOVER, ALSIKE AL- 
FALFA, HULLED WHITE AND YEL- 
LOW SWEET CLOVER, BLUE GRASS, 
FANCY RECLEANED RED TOP, ETC. 



Northern Kentucky's! 



United 'States Wheat DirectorsiLicense No. 010835-Y 




LEADING GROCERS 
AND SEEDSMEN. 



A Heart-to-Heart-Talk 

How many times have you read an advertise- 
ment, "Walked right in and turned around 
and walked right out again ?" We have 
• no fear of you doing this here, 

BECAUSE: 

FIRST — We are judges of cloth and have the 
most dependable lines of CLOTHING made. 



I 
l 



SECOND— We know we give you Worman- 
ship and a Perfect Fit. 

Wachs' Clothing means complete satisfaction, 
and you cannot obtain better anywhere at 
any priee. Let us show you our line of Mens'* 
Young Mens' and Boys' 

Suits and Overcoats. 



Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 



ii< 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 



e^^ 

WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will rjrnish An/ 'Kind of Equipment fou i/esire. 

Consolidated Phone 35. Farmers Phone. 



/ 



/ 



y\ 



rii • pan fMk w 

foi HtrippiiiK lob) 

good •tupping 



I -I Uti 



Philip Taliaferro 
Undertaker s Embalmer 



Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 

ERLANGER, .... 




KY, 



Phones | Night . ^ 52 y 



^~— ^mm — — ^^— i n i — ^fc— m il ■■ ■ i m ■■»■■■ — ^^s»»WSWS*a ^^f 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit 6v Them. 



. 






, * 



f,i^"V-'g1irv^mi^'iaf?J'; l i 



mm^m^m^ 



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^—^^—^^^^—i^m^^**mm^m™mmmm^mmmmmmm—**mm. 



THURSDAY JAN. 29th 1920 



:;*> county 



RECORDER 



WW CO. RECORDER 

HJBI.ISHFI) KVK11Y THURSDAY 
W. L. KIDDf. 1. 1, "Publisher. 



Tr'< ie<) nt il.«- P< m< flier in Burling 
hi, Ky.. as Second-class Mail 



SOLD $10,000 WORTH 
OF CREAM TO THE 
TRI-STATE BUTTER CO 



Harrison, Ohio, Man Says He Never 
Received a Cream Check But That 
He Felt He Had Been (u\ en Right 
Weight and Test. 



HUBERT RYLE & SON 



Hr> i'iI.ts unit l*!i!iiiM>r.s t>f 



"After 7 years' dealings we feel 
it your due to ha**3 a word of 
appreciation for your square deal- 
ings in that time'' writes Chas. 
Bonham, a well knowin and re- 
apected farmer of Harri?on, Ohio. 

Mr. Bonham iB well known hi 
his community and takes an ac- 
tive part in all activities for the 
betterment of the agricultural in- 
terests. He has a herd of 21 Jer- 
eeys and he considers them best 
for cream production. 

,: We sold a few cans of cream 
to the local stations to try tlrvn 
out, 1 ' continued Mr. Bonham, "lui. 
always went back to The Tri- 
State.'' Mr. Bonham received over 
$10,000.00 in Tri State checks dur- 
ing the past 7 years and butter- 
fat was considerable cheaper 7 
years ago than it is today. Every 




Purebred Hampshire Swine 

All Stock Registered. 
Correspondence and Inspection Invited. 

We carry" the blood lines of Lookout, General Tipton, Silko, 
and the l)o\t Drop strain. Best lines of breeding to be found, 
they have size and quality and early maturing. The best hog 
for the breeder and the best to build up his hank account. 
Why raise scrubs that consume morn feed ami sell for less 
money? Hampshire* fed at the Ky\ Agricultural College 
dressed 90 per cent.; LesS than 10 per cent Iosh. 

GRANT, - KY. 



INVASION OF HOLLAND. 



Washington, January 25.— Unless 
Great Britain actually invades Hoi 
land and takes the former Kaiser 
by force, William, of Rohctnzol- 
lern will never be brought to trial, 
is the opinion of officials and dip- 
lomats here. J Burlington and Big Bone road on 



Public Sale. 

* 

We will u If or at public sale at 
the residence of the late James 
H. Stephens, % mile north of 
Big Bone Grange Hall, on the 



Saturday, \ii\ 31,1328 



These- officials discount the re 

port that the former Kaiser will 

bo tried in his absence fo»" the 
new cream buyer that opened up ! reason he has already been tried j 
shop, tried to tuy Bonham'* anfl found guilty by all the allied ! 
■cream— he was coaxed to give j nations. It is regarded here as the following property: 

them each a trial, but even tho | conclusive that Holland has so re- 3 pood Milch Cows that will be fresh 
the station buyers did their best, \ huffed the allied nations that di- shortly, Holsti in heifer » months 
it was useless for Mr. Bonham to j plomacy undertaken^ to effect the old, 4 Turkey hens (youug). '1\ doz 
sell his cream to a commission 
buyer, for when one handles a 
herd of 21 cows, the hard work is 
done before the cream is brought 
to town and when the cream is 
in town, Mr. Bonham couldn't see 
any use in taking from 3 cents 
to 5 cents per pound less for his 
cream in order to 'favor a cream 
"buyer, especially when he knew 
his cheek would come along from 
The Tri State in a few days af- 



himself 



ter shipping, bringing the FULL self with the British electorate and 
price for the cream. 

The Tri State Butter Company 
only buys from the producer and 



tcy 

surrender of the Kaiser is no Ion- Plymouth Rock hens, lot Mea't. and 
ger feasible. • i, ar d, Iron Kettle, Brass Kettle. Dix- 

In addition, it vias pointed out j e Plow new, Double Shovel Plow 

lere, today, the alles, even before Single Shovel Plow, set Buggv Har- 

the dispatch of the note demand- n0S 8, Ix>g Chain, Shovels ' Hoes 

ing the former Kaiser, knew that Forks, 6 gallon Mqk Can, 2 Churns 

Holland in all its history hadnev- Household" and Kitchen Furniture, 

er surrendered a political prison- Rt ,d various articles too numerous 

er. Therefore, the diplomatic op- to mention. 

d George 
der 



inion here is that Lore 



George aim 
ply pressed for the surrender of der, cash; on sunns over $5.00 acred 



Terms— All sums of-$5.00 and un- 



the former monarch to square him it of months without interest will 



with the treaty which h 
had framed. 
He now will be in a 



position to 
every shipment is received in the I say that he tried by every a vaifa- 
patron's own can and over 35,000 ■ able method to bring about the 
of the largest cream producers j surrender of the one-time German 
find it a big advantage to ship 
DIRECT, as it gives the cream- 
ery so much 'better quality of 
cream and consequently a better 
price to the producer compared 
to the mixing of all kinds togeth- 
er. 

We will gladly send Free Trial 
Cans Cor 3u day* to any One need- 
ing car.r> to give us a triaf. If 
you have cans, write for shipping 



monarch, and that Holland has 
practically declared that the only 
way to get him out is for Ger 
many to make the request. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦« 

♦ ♦ 

♦ FRANCESVILLE. « 

♦ • 

Mike Stahl is numbered anion? 



bo piven, purchasers to give notes 
with approved security, payable in 
Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, 
Ky., before removing property. 

The farm of9J acres will be offered 
for sale at the same time and place. 
On the farm is a 4-room housn ani 
other necessary buildings. The 
rigkt will be reserved to reject any 
or all bids made on the farm. 

Mrs. J. H. STEPHENS* SONS. 
Sale ( ci begin at 1 o'clock p nit 



Public Sale! 

— — _ > — i — j ! 

Having sold my farm, known as the John 
Foston farm, located near Limaburg, Boone 
County, Ky., on the Limaburg and Hebron 
pike, I will offer for sale to the highest bidder on 

Saturday, Jan'y 31, '20 

Beginning at 1 O'clock p. m. 

The Following Property: 
7-year old Draft Mare— in foal, 10-year okj Draft Mare, this 
is an extra good farm team ; 1 good Jersey Cow, 1 Sow and 
Pigs, 1 Sow— bred, 2 Shoats, 1 Troy Farm Wagon, 1 top 
Spring Wagon, 1 top Buggy, 1 set double Wagon Harness 
in first-class condition, 1 set Buggy Harness, 1 set Spring 
Wagon Harness, 1 Sled, lot of Hay in barn, some baled 
Straw, 1 breaking Plow, double shovel and single shovel 
Plows and a lot of other farm tools, and lot of Rhode Is- 
Red Chickens; lot of Geese and various other things. 



TERMS OF SALE. 



/ 



tags. Tho Tri State Butter Com- the sick this wo "k 
pany, Cash Capital, $250 000.00 ; 953 wifl Kruse was'trar 
Keiiyo.T Ave, Cincinnati, Ohio.- J inPas in Burlington. S 

Miss Laura Katherin 

tho guest of Miss Rhoda Egglei 

ton, Saturday. 



nsacting bua- 
Saturday. 
Miss Laura Katherine Evans waa 



PLANS HEADY. 

_«► 

Plans a:id specifications, havo 
fceon received by the County Clerk 
for the construction of the Cov- 
ington and Lexington pike from 
ihv railroad crossing in Erlainger 
to the south corporate limits of 
the town of Florence. This roaa 
is a Federal aid road. That part 
within the town of Florence, 2280 



Jemeson Aylor left last Satur 
day for a visit with relatives in 
Hamilton, Ohio. 

Mrs. O. C. Henry, of Mason-co., 
spent the week-end with Misse* 
Amanda Koons and Sadie Rieman. 

Miss Alice Eggleston entertain- 
ed her cousin, Miss Rhoda Egglea- I 
ton, Saturday night and Sunday. 

Mrs. A. J. Ogden has 



• GUNPOWDER • 

• ♦ 

Robert E. Tanner is confined to 
his room with a severe ease of 
grippe. 

On account of the Incle ment 
w r eather there were no serVices at 
Hopeful last Sunday. 

Airs. Lena Bentham, the census 
enumerator in this district, com- 
pleted her work on our ridge last 
week. 

A Mr Criswell, W. H Smith and 
Ed. Slayback and family spent fast 
Sunday afternoon with R. E. Tan- 
ner and wife. 



Miss Elizabeth Snyder, daugh- 
. B ^i, ua 3 returned | ter of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Snyder, 

the corporation line of Florence i Ludlow. ***»*«v» 

Mrs. 



i.-poration line' of Florence j diow" "* --—#. «■ i »eek with pneumonia. We are 

to the Kenton county line, 2600 „ « ... XT , , . . ! g | ad to . 8a .y that ? he 1B getting 

feet, it is to be concrete 18 feet I Mrs . ^ €,he M^rkland, who was | along nicely 




All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on all sums over $10.00 a credit 
of six months will be given, purchasers to give notes~with approved "Se- 
curity, negotiable and payable at Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky., 
before removal of property. 

H. R. Leidy. 

Lute Bradford, Auctioneer. Hubert Conner, Clerk. 



PUBLIC SALE 



ir ii t rf*i* To p^ 
Tho Federal Government payH^oV dren, and Mr. and 'm^s? U'ilV Rr-it" ! ff'. r a " d mother, of Hebroh 
per cent of tho cost of the con- ! m , a ? n . weie Sunday guests at Mike j * 



*i;ru3tl3li ol this load and the Stahl's. 

citiz.ns o-; Brtanger and Florence Mr. and M:'s. C. S. Rijd?!! had 
payj -.5 p_>r cent of the construe- as guests Sunday, Mr. and Mro. J. 
lio.: oi ilia )oaU through these W. Grant, of Bulliitsville, Mr. and 
towns, llu remaining 5 per ce»it Mrs. C. D. Seothom, and .Mr. and 
is u b-3 paid by the State of , Mrs. Raymond Baker and JitUe. 
Kc::.a3.i.v. Boone and Kcntou pay j son, Ronald Lee. 
45 p..; cent of tho cost of co.i- j Rev B . F. Swindler has been 
•tro'i'J.j lii'ough these oou.ntuM, 
• th-' Fcdoral and State Government 
payi.!^ ihe balance of the cost 
oi lo ■tuctioi, When completed 
this will make a stretch of con- 
crete :rom the southern limits of 
Florence to Covington, a dis- 
tance of 12 mile* Tliis wiil be a 
very expensivp-f>ioce of road f o? 
the towns of Erlanger and Flor- j 
e.nce but those towns can not keep j To All Veterans of the World War 



called as a pastor by Sand Run 
church and* there will be ser- 
vices every first and third Sun- 
day in each month. Services next 
Sunday morning at 11 a. m. All 
are invited to attend. 

ATTENTION! 



in repair that part of thet road 
within their limits on account of 
the heavy truck and automobile 



Soldiers, Sailors and Marines : 
The' American Legion is about 
to make its first affort to induce 



travel. Roads constructed of con- ; a li the men and women whoserv- 
crete, with good foundations, ai-; | e d in % the late war to acquaint 
the only class of roads that will themselves with the principle*, I A ^Z^TSJSZ 
stand the preocnt day travel, jmrposte and aceompliahments oi , u^f n h j" h ™* 
Tina is the most expensive con- this organization i naVin ? tn ° 1 

rtruction but the cheapest In the We want them in, and an oppor- ' movrd 
end IJidsfor the work will I.e. i tunity/is also to ho given thr 
tran date j mothef-s, swters, daughters 

, wives of veterans to associate , 
themselves and form an Auxiliarv i S u? ».. 
1 Federal Aid fcr StatO SchOOlS. to this Post of the American Le-! i ■' E . arly has T Purchased prop- 

CTty in Aurori, Indiana, and wdl 



to be iixt>d. 



Redmon Gossett had the mis- 
fortune to lose a cow and horse 
by death. They went to a spring 
to get Water and in trying to get 
out thry had no foot 'hold on ac- 
count of the ice and when found 
they were so thoroughly chilfed 
thai: they died 

• ♦ 

♦ PETERSBURG, ♦ 

* • 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦• 

Miss Albert! Kelly apen. Sunday 
with Mis* Evelyn W'itham. 

Mr. Geo. Hughes, who has been 
•juite ill, is improving 

A depot for receiving and test- 
ing cream is being advocated for 
Petersburg. 

Miss Lee Etta Myers spent the 
week-end with Mrs. B. C. Gaines 
of the Idlewild neighborhood. 
Mrs. Charles Shinkle and little 
are in Cincinnati 
little, one's tonsils re- 
move 
Dr. Lorimer Berkshire, of Lewis- 
■j i port, Ky., was here attending the 
1 funeral of his aunt Mrs. Fannie 





1 




J 



I will sell at my residence on the Henry W. 
Snyder farm two miles north of BuUittsville, 
Boone County, Ky., on " -^ ^^^ 

/». 

Beginning at 1 2 otclocfe sharp 

The Following Property : 
5 Cows— 2 of them with calves by their side, 3 .yearling 
Heifers, 1 2-yeair old Filly, 1 yearling FilL3rv4"Sows, 1 Boar^I 
200 bushels more or lessCorri, 200 bushels more less Oats, 
5 tons Hay, Binder, Mower, Rake, Chilled Plow, Jumping 
Shovel Plow, Cultivator, Disc Harrow, 60-tooth Harrow, 
and many other articles too numerous to mention. 



gion. 



Drive starts ' £°.™ V* that **** wiUlin a 



The Membership 
February 1st and ends February ; lortn,gnt ' 

regular meeting of Boone I MrB Frank Rulared, of Indian.i- 



d. Th^ 



Post \ull hi> held in Burlington, P OUB . and Mrs. George Wood, Jr., 
•« VocaH-a- ! Tuesday, Feb. Srd, '"^^rt 1-M y ! of T *wrene*' «g> were quests Jt 
nfrton hasl">- and each meml>er is urged to . Mrs. Ross Shinkle the past week. 



Kentucky ist o receive federal 
aid in the conduction 61 cei 
tain branches of the educational 
syBtera of the state. 

The •'gderaL ^iiaid "\ 
*,al Education at Washington has I »n.. and each member is urged 

J decided to certify the amount of be present and to bring an aj>-j The stove leagues in the je;- 

/ *T0,769.3l to the secretary of thc|P« can t- Each member will be giv- eral stores are well attended theae 

treasury ior u.n- in Kentucky i tn his membership card on thu;days, and some live issues are 

This amount will be divided : occasion, and plans generally will | being discussed and possibly some 
$35,146.96 for agricultural training, be discussed. Remember th:v dead ones too. 
$13,133.40 for trade industry, home 'chow' Committee will serve 
and Economics and $'22,188.95 for ; lunch after the meeting. 
^Oeachers' training » 

The government has net aside a Earl Smith was <mi oi-lhc war 
monster fund for vocational edu-}palh last Frida) morning not- 
cation, and each state will receive 'withstanding il was very danger- 
its share according to population, j ous walking Dogs had "been bc- 

Person* interested hi vocational si'ii^ing his sheep barn and he I tii 
education are Interested in the an- armed himself with ■ sever faii- 
noancenient from Washington thai mg shot gun and came to town in 
government tools wiil 1** sold al search of some of ih" niuttoii 
cost to educational institutions, hunting 'canines but faili*?l to lo- 

SSViding they are sold to ittU-lcate any of them 
nts at cod . 

L iichron Amusement Co Wiil gt\e 

Mrs. Elizabeth Uti died ol pneu , anotber good show nexi Saturday 

monia at her her horn*' in Krlan : nighl It in evident dial (hicom- 
fpr, laet Monday tilght. Hhe Is n j pany has stunk a i.oj.itl tr cord 
•Inter Of Mrs. K B \Hz of near | in its eommunitv 



and alreadv u» 



Burlington, and of Johnson Bog- hih<.i>i»/i \h ussuieit ,d order 

f Waltes) 
hueUaod 



era 



ingl 

of Wait 
flrtl huel 
Vis, *nd 



neighhorlKHxl Her 
iraa the late Nosh 
■ t eend heaband bo- 
th/ lata R K VXr„ bo^b of 
*4W»iavtbeeii d««d auny yeara 



anil funt-i'lusn showii are insured 
th«* patriMis, nnd all the people 
tn the northern part of the coun- 
ty are pulling for the BiieeeM of 
the 



Amuaenu'ut l omnany. 



• e 

a BKRKON « 

♦ a 

•♦♦♦♦ea»e»eeeeeeeaeaeeeaa« 

Mr and Mrs, Joseph Bullock con 
very ill. v - 

Miswn Ruth and Lorena Regen- 
hogen entertained with a play 
party last Tuesday night. 

Mrs Qeo (iorflon had a new 
piano delivered to her home last 
«eek 

Owing to the heavy sleet 
church services were called off 
until the 2»lh of February. 

After spending a week at her 
home here Mrs (' Q, Hmith re- 
turned to the home ofherdaugh 
«i Price Hill List week. 

On « nil n nt of sickness of thr 
teacher the Intermediate room Of 
th«- sehool here closed last Mon- 
day (or * while. 



Terms Made Known on Day of Sale. 



R. C. Ratliff . 



EDGAR C. RILEY, Auctioneer. 



DONT 
DESPAIR 

If you are troubled with peine or 
aches; feel tired'; have headacha, 
indication, inaomnia; painful paae- 
age of urine, you will find relief in 

COLD MEDAL 

«^ QO0OQD93 ^^ 

Th« worM'a atandara rsmsdy for M4nar> 



llvar, bUd<l*f sn4 arte acM irauMas ami 
NsUomI kraMdy of MoUi 
Thfsa dsN sll <li««ffaMa. 



i sea. 



DOES YOUR MONEY 
EARN 10* ? 

If not, writ* tia and *• will sho^r 
you how you can make your 
money sarn that much or moro 
In onnscrvntlve Invpstmentn. ' 

, ADDRIMi 
P. 0. tax BOB Louiavlllf, Ky. 



Webater c.ounty tobacco grow-- 
ers meit and ' adopted resolutions 
not to sell their crops over loose 
leaf floors. It is estimated that 
two million pounds will be effect- 
ed. Growers ther" say buyerB 
have offered from 20 to' 25 cents 
a pound for crops. Although no 
aotlon has been taken in that 
county to pool the crop it is 
believed pooling papers will be 
circulated this spring which will 
tie up this year's crop Honder- 
aon and Union county growers 
have taken no action taward 
holding crops from the market. 
High prices prevented similar ac- 
tion tnere, Barn buyers have pip- 
chased many crops In the Hehn-e, 
Dixon and Slaughter taotjOM 



FOR RENT. / 

I will rani oiv farm to n good noil 
est iimn fur tHfiii ensh. allow $AO for 1 Don't grow all tobacco this year 
fMiiciiiK or imvothsr ntictissary Un- Mr Farmer *b*eauso It l» high. 

froveuiHiits. Writs inn If you m«an Orow more poUtoea, as they sre 
uaiiiKBs j hie h and will ha for many, yeara 

UHn J A KOdlHM. | yet Th.»y are the i««alsef crop 
o i moh BrookviUa, Mo. grown on the farm 



it 



i 



t 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY JAW. m» tt» 



« 



s 



"Trade Where they All Trade" 

Goode &Dunkie 

are doing more business than any other house in Northern Kcncucky . 
WHY ? Ask any of our customers about our Prices, Treatment, 
and Quality of goods. , 

M* Farm*'-**. 

Almost every day we get favorable reports on seeds we have 
sold. We do not handle low grade, trashy seeds. We know seeds 
and we know where to buy and we give you the benefit of our 
knoweledge and experience, When you order from us you can de- 
pend on High Test, Purity and Germination. 

Send us your inquiries for prices and samples of CLOVER, AL- 
FALFA, ALSIKE, TIMOTHY, BLUE GRASS, ORCHARD 
GRASS, Etc. 

WE BUY RIGHT AND WE SELL RIGHT. 



Send ut your orders for Granula- 
ted Sugar. We will try to fill 
then. 



Blatchford's Calf Meal, cwt. $5.90 
Conceded to be the ' best on the 
market. ../ 



MFnOE 



GRO CERIES. FL OUR SEED S . MEDICINES. 
/9-2/PIKE ST. /a 20W.7™ST. 



WHOLESALE-'Tovinjton'. L«rg«.t Seed and Grocery Houm"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

/ Phones South 338 and 336. 

United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



PUBLIC SALE! 

Owing to my farm being sold I will offer at 
public sale at our residence, known as the old 
Jim Jones Homestead, on Gunpowder Creek, 
at the foot of the Kendall hill, on 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 
• ♦ 

• RABBIT BASU „ • 

W" * 

Mrs. Sallie StPjih - . . CV, wido?/ 
of the late Richard Stephens, died 
at her home in Rabbit. Hish Fri- 
day morning, of pneumonia. She 
was a daughter of the late Ma- 
rion and Elizabeth Hawkins Steph 
ens and a member of a pioneer 
family of this county and was a 
most estimable lady. She is sur- 
vived by two sons, John Q. and 
Hugh Stephens, one daughter, Mrs. 
Frank Scott: one sister, 9 broth- 
ers and numerous other relatives 
and a host of friends. She was 
a member of East Bend Methodist 
church and of the Pythian Sisters 
Lodge at Rabbit Hash. Puneraf ser 
rvstsv %^^P-heid at the reeiv....^,.^ 
Monday morning, Rev. Mr. Hart, 
of Rising Sun M. E. church offi- 
ciating She was buried beside her 
husband in the old Stephens ceme 
tery near Gunpowder. 




.... U S 



HUME 



Henry Binder, who has been ill, 
is getting better. 

Miss Kate Baker is visiting rel- 
atives in Louisville. 

Mrs, G. W. Baker, who has ton- 
silitis, is some better. 

Miss 'Rose Krause was a guest at 
John Binder's last Sunday. 

Ora Smith is the gu^st of his 

frandpa rents, Mr. and Mrs W. D. 
mith, near Verona. 

Tom Allphin was the guest of 
his parents, J. J. Allphin and 
wife, in Gallatin county, last Fri- 
day. 

Miss Kate Binder, who was calf- 
ed home on account of the death 
of her sister has returned to the 
city. 

Langhorn Anderson, of Mays- 
ville, bought of. J. G. Finnell and 
wife 20 acres of land near Hume 
for $2,600. 





3, 1920 



the following property : 

1 Cow to be fresh in Feby., 3 Cows to be fresh 
in March, 4 Cows to be fresh in April, 1 fresh 
Jersey Cow with calf by her side. 2 2-year old 
Hereford Bulls, 9 good Ewes to lamb in Febru- 
ary. 1 yearling Buck, O. I. C. Boar, 1 red Sow, 

2 Pigs---Riley stock, brand new Deering Disc 
Harrow, brand new Peering Hay rake, McCor- 
mick Mower, A Harrow, Vulcan Turning Plow, 
Tobacco Sticks, Set Work Harness, 3 5-gallon 
Milk Cans, Primrose Separator good as new, 
and other articles too numerous to mention. 

aMHHMsMaMBlMn^BMBlnMBMBnVMM»VaVaaHa*B«BVMnVaVB*BVt^^ 

TERMS — On all sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on all sums over $10.00 
a eredit of 12 months without interest, purchasers to give notes with approv- 
ed security negotiable and payable at Peoples Deposit Sank, Burlington, 
Ky »beibt , '*,reiiwv«'yg property. 

York and Kruse. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock J. M. EDDINS, Auctioneer. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

• « 
« PLORENCP. * 

* « 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

Born, last Sunday mopning to 
A. C. Scott and wife a boy. 

Mrs. Charles Scott was the 
guest of Miss Bridget Carey last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Clarkson 
were guests at Ira Tanner's last 
Sunday. 

Miss Irene Cahill, of Madiaon- 
ville, Ohio, spent last Sunday here 
with her parents. 

Mabel Carpenter, Rebecca and 
Lahman Hambrick Bpent Sunday 
with Jennie May and Katheline 
Lai le 

Some time since Owen Bradford 
found on the Dixie Highway an 
atuo chain which the owner can 
have by calling on him. • 

The many friends of Cliff Nor- 
man and Nellie Carpenter will be 
surprised to hear that they were 
married last Saturday afternoon. 

Do not fail to come out and 
hear the great evangelist E. O. 
Hobbs, of Louisville, who speaks 
at the M. E. church every even- 
ing at 7 o'clock. 




No Place Like Home. 

I have a much larger stock of 

Hardware, Dry Goods, No- 
tions and Groceries 
for 1920 

Than I have ever carried before. 

ntemational Trucks, International Tractors, 
International Road Wagons, 

International Manure Spreaders, 

International Primrose Separators 

A Complete line of all kinds of farm fencing. 
^% ft 

A nice line- of harness, such as Bridles, Collars, Back Bands 

Check lines, and complete sets of harness. 



D 



.j Feed, Flour, Salt, Etc. 

Some pretty patterns of Ginghams and Calicoes 
to select from. 



I think I will, be able in a short while, when you come into 
my store and ask for an article, I can tell you that I 
have it for you at a price that you will be satisfied. > 



If you have any country lard to sell, I want it, and wiH 
pay you a fancy price. Bring your eggs and poul- 
try to me for I have always led in prices. ' 

STAY tfY YOUR HOME DEALER 

- AND HE WILL STAY WITH YOU. 

W. L. KIRK PATRICK, 

Burlington, Ky. 

^ i T caoc= — ii \jy 




♦ 
♦ 



VERONA. 



♦ 



tfc 



Robert Orr, Jr, has measles 

Ray Stewart is recovering from 
mum pa. 

— Pro s pe cts for a wheat eropare 
not very flattering. 

Those who have ice houses to 
fill find they have a good sup- 
ply. 

O. K. Powers' little boy, Rick- 
man, who has diphtheria, is re- 
ported improving. 

Aa usual there will be consid- 
erable moving in this neighbor- 
hood the first of March. 

A. C. Roberts waa transacting ' 
business in Walton last Monday 
and attending the loose leaf to- 
bacco market 

Farmers generally are not very 
well pleaseo with the present 
prices of tobacco, which will have 
an effect on the planting of anoth 
er crop. 

We are experiencing the most 
disagreeable spell of weather of 
the winter. A thick coat of ice 
covers the ground and trees are 
breaking down with their ^Jead of 
ice. 



IL 



Boone County Boy 

IS NOW LOCATED AT 

9th 8- Banklick St. Covington, Ky. 

Handling Fresh and Cured Meats, 
Fish and Game- 
Will buy anything- the farmer has to sell. 
Special price on flimr, long as it lasts: 

Best Winter Wheat Flour on the market, guaran- 
teed 196 lbs. wood, $13.75 ; 24 A lb. sack, $1.60. 
or $12 80 per barrel. 

Call and see me— get acquainted. 

A. L. LANCASTER. 



"H 




I 




T'S a wise idea to place your order for a car now, 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 



> 




._.- 1. . 



COLDS I 
Sprwlll 

KILL THE C( 
ONCE WITH 

I 

cascawOquinin£ ST 



For a farmer who is engaged The local far dealer, Herbert 
raising fine stock or poultry with I Kirkpatrick, has handled a largo 

whlrh he desire* supplying his amoun t oi high priced furs this 

county people, there is no better winter, and many of the trapperslTl J«~le£ 

way of letting them know the in thim e^ty £* de , nice ',£ t , e -«en Hoagv 

fsct than by running sn adver- 8um wltn thelr trap ^ A („„* 

Usement in the county paper, as num ber of persons engage in trap 

Hubert Ryle & Son huve decided ping <>Vtvry winter and In s few 

to do. About every person in the vt . grH vcry farm will be a private 

county who takes pridt* in fin© ; vterV atlon for some trapper If 

hogs will know in a few weeks tht . ow „ ol . t |5«>!» ,„>■ 

• lust where they can secure a pura , „ Mrt aiHl ,, aHlt|m , 

• bred UampshU-e hog, mule or fe- 

The sale «»r i. k Htrnhone* of 
Hultittavillr neighborhood, adver- 
tised for la"»( Hi lis huh calloU 
off until next h'ridnx Uhh«mi 
on tOOSeal "' the bad w oather 
Because uf the »i<«.i K would 
have best) Uaugrrx.ua fur a 
aou to have ti Mr 

stepfe-eas' residence teat Im^km^ 



•ft 

male, information that will is no- 
wise be to Mr. Kyle's disadvant- 
age 

Circuit Clerk Usurer rarrUts life 
insurance but he eoukd Ant 

J?» - KjM k la5*rS 

trying to ousjsJIEmi bis suWrbau 



'» n<d engage In tha 
himself. 



to ou«s£ U« bis suburbs 
to Cfl^pr lost rrluay 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a 

» e 

e BEAVER LICK. ♦ 

+ + 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mr. Howe Henry, of Beaver, has 
mumps 

Mrs Jane Hancc Sleet hae re- 
signed aa teacher in the Beaver 
school. 

This is the worst sleet we have 
had in many years in this neigh- 
borhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Osem.m spent 
last Tuesday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe W. Cleek. 

John Delehaunty, one of our 
moat successful sheep raisers, 
35 young lambs and has lost but 
two. 

Lost— On the road between the 
Beaver school house aasi Hughes 

Finder will 
Annie 



ha« 



Chapel, fountain pen 

? lease return to Miss 
leek 



Q. A. Slayback sold 635 pounds 

of his crop of tobacco last wee* 

at $60 75 per 100. Joe W. Clerk »»<i 

sold one load of their 

73 per hundred 

Mis* Marguric Dencgan Iiim re- 
signed aa twitch operator at Bes- 
ver, and Mrs Lee Afterlutk and 
daughter, Misa Mary, *ill move to 
the exchange about l''el> tut 

Walter Howard, who is H|H>iidliig 
the winter lu Florida, aeut Mr and 
Mia John Kngliali. Mr and Mn 
William Uuward ami Mr and Mra 
Joe W. I'luvk, naeh u bos of fine, 
large, aweet oraugua a aboil Urn* 

ago 



Nttiioiaavdk* - ih.. ai eer e farsa 

[ H II Vhoiiiiiaon JuaC bougUl l>y 
Howard fwr »iU,tKMI has b SS P 

U*. lllUM Ml lit IIKWllha 



•old 



m 

it/ 

m 
(?> 

m 



Hudton Speedster $2315 40. 
Essex Touring $1588. 

Essex Roadster $1588. 

Dodge Touring $1175. 

Dodge Coupe $1867. 

Dodge Sedan $2025. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above prices are delivered at your door. 

If you want to place an order for any of these cars, 

call 



The Income Tax. 

Every unmarried person having a gross income of 
$1,000, and every married person having a gross in- 
come qf $2,000 or more must file a return with the 
Collector of Internal Revenue before March 15. 

If we can be of service to you in this matter it 
will be our pleasure to do so. 

We feel that there is more in banking than the mere 
lending of money, cashing checks, accepting deposits, 
etc; it is that broad word SERVICE to which you 
are entitled at our hands. USE US. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky, 



Capital 

Surplus and Profits 



$50,000.00 
$100,000.00 



W. L B ROUSE. President. K. B. RENAKER, Caski«r. 

EDGAR C RILEY, Vice-Pree. 
NELL 11 MARTIN. Aaat. CaefcJer. I. T. UTZ, A..I Castier. 



ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDED 

Subscribe for the Recorder, 



, 



swsiBaw 



S^S^Sl 



'mm 



•HaUaWiil 



lay, January 29. 1920. 



fcuoNE COUNTY XECOKDER 




CHURCHES TO SPEND 
MILLION DOLLARS IN AN 
ADVERTISING CANPAIGN. 



MORE AND BETTER CHICKENS 



Owner of Common Mongrel Flock 

Will Soon Apologize for It* Exist- 

cnce— Keep Pure-Breda. 

(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 
It will not be long before the owner 
of a common mongrel flock will apolo- 



gize for its existence. This is the opin 

Ion of the poultry-extension worker of |j ng f the amount needed for the 



An Associated Proas Dispatch 
from Atlantic City the past week 
stated that The In terchurch World 
Movement had decided upon a 
newspaper advertising campaign in 
connection with its program of 
evangelizing the world. It was 
stated that leaders of the move- 
ment had given their approval to 
this plan, which will start with 
the church press about February 
1, and include practically every 
medium of publicity, including the 
rural newspapers of the country, 
in an effort to bring the world 
evangelization plan directly to 
all the people. 

The decision followed a three- 
day conference at Atlantic City, 
in which Dr. R. II. Crossfield, prej 
ident of Translyvenia College at 
Lexington, represented that in- 
stitution. One of the aims of the 
Interchurch World Movement is 
to avoid duplication of work 
among the churches in the rais- 



the United States department of agri- 
culture who is a leader In the cam- 
paign for more and better poultry on 
•farms in south and southwestern Ar- 
kansas. In many parts of Arkansas 
the importance of better poultry and 
iraore efficient management is being 
recognized by progressive business 
men, commercial organizations, bank- 
ers and others and they are active in 
their moral and financial support in 
co-operating with the government and 
state extension forces in their efforts 
jo convince the farmer that standard- 
bred poultry properly managed Is a 
paying Industry, and that the old 
barnyard mongrel hen must get out 
of" the way for standard-bred, uniform 
flocks. 

The county agent of Drew county 
has placed 50 pens of one male and 
, four females each of pure-bred Bar- 
red Plymouth Rock and Rhode Island 
'Beds on 50 farms, in charge «f a boy 
•and girl poultry-club member. The 
Montleello Chamber of Commerce and 
the banks of Montieello have advanced 
the money to purchase these pare: 
'bred fowls und have assisted In their 
distribution. In addition to the ."u 
pens of chickens, over 100 sittings 
(Of pure-bred hatching eggs have been 
secured foi the club boys and girK 
The farm and home demonstration 



evangelization work of the Chris- 
tian denominations. 



TOBACCO MARKET. 

Covington, Jan. 24— Totaf sales 
37,810 pounds, average, $20.43. Pri- 
ces ranged from $90 down as low 
as $5 per 100. 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court, Ky. 

Hattie B. Tilley Burns, Ac. Pltfs. 

against | No. 2983 Equity 
Husio Tilley, &c, Defendants. 

By virtue of a judgment and order 
of sale rendered by the Boone Cir- 
cuit, Court at its Dec. term, 1919. 
in the above styled cause, I shall 
proceed to offer for sale ait the court 
house door, In Burlington, Boone 
county, Kentucky to the highest 
bidder, at public sale, on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February 1920, at one 
o'clock p. m. or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
six and twelve months, the following 
property, to- wit: 

Lying and being in the town of 
Petersburg, Boone County. Ky., and 
neing the west half of Lot No. 93 as 
laid down on the plan and plat of 
said towp. 

For the purchase price the purch- 
aser of said real estate, with approv- 
ed security or securities, must execute 
bond, bearing 8 per cent interest from 
the day of sale until paid, and hav- 
ing the force and effect of a Judg- 
ment, with a lien retained therein 
until all the purchase money is paid. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
with these terms. 

CHAS. MAURER, 
Master Commissioner 



Commissioner's Sale. 



Carrollton, Jan. 23. 
sold, average S35.43. 



-124,190 lbs. 




Falmouth, Jan 23.— 57,310 pounds 
sold, average of $39.01. 

There is a decided slump in the 
price of tobacco and especially on 
the lowest grades, which are sell- 
ing one hundred per cent Tower 
than last year. The crop in Pen- 
dleton this year is the worst in 
the history of the county, and 
the pi ices are very disappointing 
to the growers, as every (thing 
they are buying is climbing higher 
every day. To sell their product 
low and pay high prices for what 
they buy is verv discouraging to 
say the least. We expect the mar- 
ket to grow stronger, I bu-1 this 
is not much consolation for the 
farmers who are selling now. The 
tobacco market is the most treach 
erous of all, and it is impossible 
to toll from one day to another 
what it is going to (v.— Oalmou'h 
Outlook. 



A Common Mongrel Flock— An Owner 
Will Take Greater Pride and Get 
Better Profits From a Good Flock 
of Uniform Birds. 

agents of Ashley. Union and Desha 
counties are bnsy with poultry-club 
work on farms and In the organiza- 
tion of poultry clubs. In each of these 
counties an efforr Is being made to 
double last year's poultry-dab enroll- 
ments. 

On March 12 the Southwestern Ar- 
kansas Poultry association was organ- 
ized at Magnolia with IS charter mem- 
bers. It Is reported that practically 
every business man in the town will 
become a member am]* lend his influ- 
ence and support for more and bitter 
poultry. Plans have been made to hold 
the state poultry show at Magnolia 
November 25 to 28, where the finest 
aristocrats of the barnyard will he 
on display competing for the coveted 
American Poultry association gold 
medal offered to only one association 
In each state. 



State News. 



Madisonvill? — John S. Atkinson, 
90, who died near White Plains, 
was the father of 18 children, 11 
of whom survive. 

Lexington— Thomas Welch, New 
York, bought from John E. Mad- 
den the original Elmendorf es- 
tate, 213 acres, for $160,000. 

Ashland— James Robertson and 
Alvin Skidmore were arrested on a 
charge of having robbed the cel- 
lar of Paul Chaunt of $2000 worth 
of whisky. 

Paris— Colonel Jas. Rogers, 96, 
formerly of Paris, Confederate ve* 
eran, died in a hospital at Green 
wood, S. C. 

Nicholfcsville.— R. M. Sparks, 
bought 113 acres of the M. B. 
Anderson farm at $401 per acre. 

Adairvilie— Hogs multigated the 
body of Wm. Markham, 68, who 
dropped dead from heart disease 
in his barn. 

Mayfield— Wm. Gpssum. 92, oM- 
est deputy sheriff in the United 
States, who died at Water Valley, 
where born, lived his entire life 
in the county. 



POINTED PARAGRAPHS. 



Beauty in a 

era a lack of 



woman often cov- 
domestie virtues. 



KEEPING POULTRY IN TOWNS 



Especially In Suburbs of Large Cities 

Families Should Keep Small 

Flocks of Hens. 



(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) • 
When conditions render it feasible 
•mall flocks of poultry should he kept 
by families In villages, towns and es- 
pecially In the suburbs of large cities. 
The need for this extension of poultry 
raising is particularly great where con- 
sumption exceeds production, us In the 
northeastern states. Through utiliza- 
tion of table waste, scraps and other 
refuse as poultry feed much whole* 
Rome food In the form of eggs ninl 
poultry for home use may lie produced 
at relatively low real 



STRONG BIRDS FOR BREEDING 



Comb, Face and Wattles Should 
Drloht Red— Eyes Bright 
and Prominent. 



I3e 



U'rru.itiiil In lh I loll 

Hunt of A*rli nliu 

i owig fm breeding put i id 

he MroitK, heuliliy, vigorous birds 1 1 ■ ■ 
mi mtrls* should in- of u 

hrbjfcl red color .j. , hrliflit iui.I I 

•nualaent. h«*d 

fttrtafcori 

ha****! pell apart au.t airulMtu piuiav 

SJfS flvau anil aamailh 



Most contributors to charity man 
age to be caught in the act. 

Bravery is reckoned by what we 
do. not by what We threaten to 
do. 

Put your business before pleas- 
ure or by and by you won't have 
either, 

Some men waste power trying 
to get wealth, then waste wealth 
trying to gett power. 



oone Circnit Con it.. 
W. M. Walton, Ac, Plaintiffs 

against { Equity 
Elinor Walton, Defendants 

By virtue of a judgment and order of 
sale of the Boone Circuit Court, render- 
ed at the Dec. term, thereof 1919, in 
the above cause, I shall proceed to offer 
for sale at the court-bouse door lu Bur- 
lington, Boone County. Ky., to the 
highest bidder at public auction, on 
Monday the 2d day of February. 1920, 
at 1 o'clock p. m., or -thereabout, being 
eountyeourtday.upou a credit of six 
and twelve months, the following 
described property, to-wit: 

Lying and being in Boone County, 
Kentucky, and bounded as follows, 
beginning at a stone on the road that 
leads from the Anderson Ferry mad 
to. Florence, corner of the lands of 
II. F.Clutterbuck heirs; thence s 21 J 
w 20.20 chains to a store in a line of 
Win. Cloud; thence with his line n 
41 w 12.81 chains to a stone in the 
Anderson Ferry road; thence with 
the road n 18J e 13.52 chains, n 1UJ 
e 13.17 chains to a stone; thence with 
the road that leads from Anderson 
Ferry road to Florence h 41 J e 13.14 
chains to the beginning containing 
20 acres, 2 roods more or less and be • 
ing the same property conveyed by 
deed recorded in Deed Book No. 40 
page 497. 

The interest of the infant defend- 
ant will not be paid by the purchases 
but shall remain a lien on the said 
land bearing interest until the said 
infant become of age or until the 
guardian of said infant executes 
bond as required by section 497 of 
the civil code. 

For the purchase price the pur- 
chaser, with approved security or 
securities, must execute bond, bear- 
ing legal interest from the day of 
sale until paid, and having the force 
and effect of a Judgment, with alien 
retained therein until all the pur- 
chase money is paid. Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly 
with these terms. . 

CHARLES MAURER, 

Master Commissioner 



Commissioner's Sale. 



When a man begins to be his 
own worst enemy he can get a 
lot of free assistance. 

About the only time a woman 
sees anything adorable in anyone 
of her sex is when she looks in 
a mirror. 

It's easy for a minister to tell 
his congregation how to reach 
heaven, but he might find it dif- 
ficult personally to conduct them 
there*, 

Monument to Defenders of Fort 

Georgetown— A monumrnt to Mc 
Clelland and his men, who, In 1776, 
defended IfcClelland'a Port which 
was situated at t he head of the 
Big Spring in Georgetown, will be 
erected shortly by the \\\<& Spring 
chanter, Daogrhte^a <>r ilw Amer- 
ican Revolution At the dedlcar 
Hon an address will ht» made i>y 
Major Samuel WlUon of Lexing- 
ton, who i» writing a history of 
the t"i i Major Wilson ha* dm i 

hiicccssint in fmiline; (he ii'iinct* ol 
thil'tj men v\ hi w< fC m t ti. « foist 

and la trying to goi In touch 

w ti h ill dea< i ndants ol these men 
in order to !■ urn more of tbeii 



NOTI4 

in of 



1 h 



election <>i 
Uueen ( It] 



will 



..in 
Mil 



UIgl'll 



1 Boone Circuit Court. 

Margaret Eshman's Guardian, Plff 
On Petition to | No. 3005 Equity. 

Sell Land. 

By virtue of a judgment and or- 
der of sale of the Boone Cirouit Court, 
rendered at the December Term, 
thereof, 1919, in the above cause, 
I shall proceed to otter for sale at the 
Court-bouse door in Burlington, Booue 
Co. Ky., to the highest bidder, at pub- 
lie sale on Monday the 2d day of Feb. 
1920, at'l o'clock p. m., or thereabouts, 
being county court day, upon a credit 
of six and twelve mouths, the follow- 
ing deHcribed property, to wit: 

Lying and being in Boone County, 
Kentucky, and being Lot No. 3 in 
the division of the land in case of 
Frank Walton, &c, vs. Margaret 
Eshman, etc. Beginning at, a stake 
in the Petersburg and Bellevue Road 
a corner with Lot No. 2; thence with 
a line of said Lot s 631 w vj chains to 
the Upper corner of Lot No. 2 on the 
Ohio river; thence up the river n 88J 
w 3 00-100 chains to the lower corner 
of Lot No. 4, including all lands west 
of said line; thence with a line of 
Lot No. 4 n 63J e 63.44 chains to the 
be^inging, containing' sixteen and 
one-half acres (16J.) 

The interest of the infant plaintiff 
Margaret Eshman shall not be i aid 
but shall remain a lieu on the land 
until the said infant becomes of age, 
or until the guardian of said infant 
execute bond as required by section 
493 of the Civil Code. 

For tbe purchase price the purchaser 
with approved security or securities, 
must ex* cute bond, beating legul inter- 
est from tbe day of sale until paid, and 
having the force and eflect of a judg- 
ment, with a lien retained therein un- 
til all tbe purchase money is paid. 
Bidders will be prepared to comply 
promptly with theneterm-*. 
CHARLES MAURKR. M. C. B. «' 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court, Kentucky. 
Elisabeth Close, Ac.plaintiffs, 

against J Nor2993, Equity. 
Agnes F. Spacy, Ac, defendants. 

By virtue of a judgment and order 
of sale of tbe Booue Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December term 
1919, in the above eause, I shall pro- 
ceed to offer for sale at the Court 
House door in the town of Burling- 
ton, Boone county, Ky., to the high- 
est bidder at publio sale, on Monday, 
the 2nd day of February, 1920, at 1 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts, being 
County, Court day,upon a credit of a 
and 12 months the following proper- 
ty, to- wit- 

Lying and being in Boone County, 
Kentucky, near Belleview. Lot No. 
1, called the Hill Tract, and seta- 
part toElizabeth Grant.beginning at 
a stone, a little west of Middle creek 
in a line of the heirs of William 
Willis, deceased, and corner " to 
M nomas Dinsmore, thence with 
Dinsniore'a line and also a line of D. 
G. Rice n29Jw 1 16} poles to a stone, 
corner to said Rice in a line of the 
heirs of Ezekiel Rice, deceased; 
thence with a line of said heirs n60} 
e 21 poles to a stone, a corner of lot 
No. 2; thence with a line thereof 
s22Ae 114 poles to a stone in a line of 
the 'Willis heirs aforesaid; thence 
with it sGOjw 21 poles to the begin- 
ning, coutining fifteen (16) acres. 

Parcel "B" lying and being in 
Boono county, Ky., adjoining the 
town of Belleview, is bounded and 
described as follows : Beginning at 
an iron pin in thd Burlington and 
Belleview road, corner of parcel 
"A:" thence with a dividing same, 
n29}e 21.24 feet, to a pin in a line of 
William Huey, corner of parcel A; 
thence with a line of said Huey 
n59Jw 180J feet to a stake, corner of 
lot No. 2 in a line of William Huey; 
thence with a line of No. 2s29Jn 21.24 
feet to a point in the center of the 
pike; thence with theoenterof same 
n60e 189 feet to the beginning, con- 
taining nine and ninety-four one 
hundredth acres (9 94), called parcel 
l, B" in the division of the seventeen 
acre tract as set out in the Commis- 
sioners' report and also the survey- 
or's report in this case. 

For the purchase price the purch- 
aser, with approved security or se- 
curities, must execute bonds bearing 
legal interest from the day of sale 
until paid, and having the force and 
effect of a judgment, with a lien re- 
tained therein until all the purchase 
money is paid. Bidders will be pre- 
pared to comply promptly with these 
terms. 

CHAS. MAURER, 
Master Commissioner, 





Commissioner's Sale. 



Out in the State. 



Shelbyville — W. L Thompson 
suestho L & N Railroad for ijtfO), 
alleging a car of cattle was al- 
lowed to remain a day and night 
hi Bagdad) had to be un/ujuct 
ref attested, the market losing 2 
cents meanwhile. 

Paris iM-.mk Duke and Baddy 
('aK*', negroes, arretted he-re, after 

i Iny had completed (the building 

i new house In ClayavlUfi a 

negro aubm-b, arei charged with 

having Htolen all of llu» material 

It 



w Inch wont into tho hiiildn 

I 

Mill 



is iillige-d that Louiat illt 
I road ears ware 



ling 

A Ni 



ih 



.it, 



M. Ml 

lend 



Nun' gallt«i» 


.,( ulna 


in anil t > 


dm 


111 ■park 


ciitotjtMl 






lined fiou and 


glVl 



Boone Circuit Court, Kentucky. 
T. W. Cook, Executor, of Ben Cook, 
deceased, plaintiff, 
against | No. 2984. Equity. 
Lelia.Cook, &c , defendants. 

By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the special 
term thereof, 1920, in the above cause, 

1 shall proceed to offer for sale at 
the Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at public sale on Monday, 
the 2nd day uf February, 1920, at 1 
p. m.. or thereabout, being County 
Court Day, upon a credit of 6 moths, 
the following property : 

Bounded and described as follows: 
Lying and being in Boone County, 
and bounded thus: Beginning at a 
point in the center of the Belleview 
and Waterloo road, corner with J. 
W. Portwood; thence with the road 
s48.jw 8 chains, s41 jw 2.69 chains to a 
point in the center of said rood, cor- 
ner with homestead tract No. 1 ; then 
with the line of same sGOfw 15 chains 
to a stake ; thence n 55 w 7.55 chains 
to a post, corner with the homestead 
in a line of 8. B. Scott; thence with 
Scott's line 1.43 chains to an Ash 
tree; thence n 40} w 4.26 chains to a 
post corner with Scott and Epbriam 
Aylor; thence with Aylor's line n 
11] e 10.42 chains to a post a corner 
with Aylor and J. W. Portwood; 
thence with Portwood's line s 67 e 
7.00 chains to a post; thence s 80 e 
10.21 chains to a post; thence n 28} e 

2 41 chains; thence s 60} e 12 chains 
to the beginning containing 25.97 
acres to be known as Tract No. 2. 

Tract No. 1 (Homestead) is bound- 
ed as follows: Lying and being'in 
Boone County, Kentucky, on the 
Waterloo and Rabbit Hash road and 
.bounded as follows: Beginning at a 

Eoint in the center of the Rabbit 
lash road a corner of Laura Clore ; 
thenoe with Clore's line a 72} w 11.48 
chains to a post a corner with S. B. 
Scott; thence with Soott's line n 10} 
w 8.47 chains to a post a corner with 
Scott and Lot No. 2; thence with the 
line thereof n 55 e 7.55 chains to a 
stake; thence s 60J e 15 chains to a 
point in the center of the aforesaid 
pike; thence with same 41 3-4 w 1.00 
s 77} w 3.81 chains, s 56} w 3.88 chns. 
to the beginning containing 11.87 
acres. 

I will first sell tract No. fccnntahi- 
ing 25.97 aoresjand If said tract fails 
to prod ace enough money to satisfy 
said Citizens DeposltwBank^s debt." 
interest and cost, I will offer and 
sell enough of tract No. 1, which is 
the homestead tract, to satisfy the 
balance of said bank debt, interest 
and costs; I will then sell the fee in 
tract No. 1 or Homestead or any 
part thereof that may then remain 
unsold after tbe sat.lfael ion of said 
bank debt, Interest and costs, sub- 
ject to the right of occupancy by 
sold widow. . 

Th h above two tracts of land be- 
ing tho same conveyed to saia dece- 
dent, Ben Cook, by J. W. i'ortwood 
and wife by deed recorded in Deed 
Book No. 57, page 210, Boohe County 
Records. 

Amount of Citizens Deposit Bank 
debt, Interest and coats, 1810.72. 
Foil dm purchase price the purchaser, 
with approved security or eeruiltlea, 
. xecnie bond*, bearing legal Inter 
e*l from ibuilay of *»Ui until |m»d, and 
i hs fbfonafd effect ofe Judgment. 
Mill, it lien retained therein until all 
Lite purchase money la paid, htddera 
will be piepaiud to comply promptly 
with lhva« Urma. 

HAHLK0 MAIIHHII. 
Master t tuiimlasioimr. 



hut a* 



the lift 



aSuro 

do Hoo Ration 

UNTIL you feed Tuxedo Hog Ra- 
tion you cannot know how cheap- 
ly pork can be developed. Tuxedo is 
a quick fattener— a never-failing pro- 
ducer of live, sturdy, good looking 
hogs. The formula is compounded 
along lines suggested by a prominent 
State Experiment Station Official. 

Note of what Tuxedo Hog Ration is made, 
and you will understand why it is so very 
nutritious: Digester Tankage, Corn Meal; 
Ground Barley, Ground Oats, Wheat Mid- 
dlings, Old Process Oil Meal, Gluten Feed; 
Alfalfa Meal. 

This balanced mixture is sweetened with 
Cane Molasses. 

ATJAT VQTQ • PROTEIN 14.5%: . FIBRE 7% 
AllAXjIOXO. CARBOHYDRATES 55%: FAT 3.5% 

Made by the Manufacturers of Tuxedo Chop, Ce-re-a-lia 
Sweets, Tuxedo Scratch, Ce-re-a-lia Egg Mash 

See Your Nearest Dealer 

FOR SALE BY t 

A. DOLW1CK, Con.tance. JACK BERKSHIRE, Pater.burg. 

M. L. CRUTCHER, Hebron. A. F. MILNER, ContUnce. 

GULLEY A PETIT, BurUngton. J. H. MAffolN, Hebron. 

STANSIFER A POWERS, Walton. 



epex 



r ^^ K * CB ^Ztmxa2K2S2G9EXmXSHem2CXXX9CXEe& 



A. E. FOSTER & SON 

FARM SALESMEN AND 



LICENSED AUCTIONEERS 

No. 3 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 

Will be pleased to talk over with you, either the sale ' 
or purchase of farm property. 





(I 



The KITCAm 





If you cannot set to meter all the music 

of your aoul. 
Then let Ita heavenly harmony your dally 

life control; 
Until from out the discord of life's bltter- 
nen and pain 
Sweet' symphonies shall rise— nor your 
life-song b« in vain. 

'-Alice Dunlap- 



FRUIT COCKTAILS 



There Ih no more appetizing begin- 
ning for a summer inenl than n fruit 
cocktail. They 
should be served 
very cold In smnll 
glasses ni- In fruit 
cups such as lem- 
on, orange, np- 
p 1 e or grape- 
fruit. Vegetables 
an; also used as 
cocktails, the tomato being the espe-! 
eial favorite. 
In preparing fruits for cocktails 
things should be remembered : 




-—Both Psoas* 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 

Boone House, 

BURLINGTON, « KY. 

Prompt Attention to all Calls. 



Attention Auto Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 
repairing- on all makes or cars. 
Starter and generator work a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 

G|ve me a trial. 

Earl M. Aylor 

HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



two 



The fruit should stand In n sirup or 
sprinkled With sugar to be well sweet- 
ened. To prepare the sirup use twice 
as much sugar as water and cook It 
until thoroughly dissolved. 

The entire menu should be consid- 
ered when serving a fruit cocktail, ns 
other fruits do not appear at the same 
meal. If a vegetable cocktail (put to- 
gether with some sort of a snlad dress- 
ing) Is served, the salad is omitted 
for that meal. 

One of the most attractive cocktails 
may be made by using watermelon or | 
inuskmelon for the foundation. Cut ' 
the melon with a French potato cutter [ 
Into small balls and cover with a gin- 
ger sirup, using the Canton ginger and 
bits of ginger; pour over the balls of 
canteloupe. For watermelon the 
dainty color makes a most effective 
dish; use the heart of the melon for 
balls and simple, lightly flavored sirup 
of sugar water and lemon Juice. It In 
unwise to add a Blruu too highly fla- 
vored, for the fruit flavor Itself should 
be first. 

A pineapple and raspberry comhlna-- 
tlon Is very good. Cut the pineapple 
with a small potato cutter and let the 
fruits stand In sirup uncomblnod for 
three hours, then chill them together 
one hour. 

Equal parts of sliced peaches and 
stoned elierrles iniirlnnted In sugur 
sirup ninl garnished with frosted 
mint. Dip n sprig of mint In egg wlite 
then In sugar, having the mint well 
.hilled 

Twice us much diced peach us very 
ripe him Idicrrlcfi, treated with the 
alrup mid llnvoierl with a little lemon 
and o range ; Juice. 

I. melon l.aul'l \Vhltl»y it it I 

flajna counties art . , om Killing til 
huiMlHtf a IIAu.iiuo ImaplUl it 
CanHi eaaetmelton work I.. I«> 



WHY BUY A SCRUB 
SIRE 

JERSEY HILL FARM 

The Home of Pure Bred 

JERSEY CATTLE 

— and— 

Chesterwhite Hogs 

offers for sale a few choice boar 
pigs. Prices Reasonable. 

S. B. RYLE, 

R. 1 Grant, Ky., 

Farmer* Phone. 

WANTED. 



Men to raise tobacco on new 
ground and work by the day when 
not in the crop. 

W. A. GAINES A 80N, 
•ofeb8 Burlington, Ky. 

R. D. I. 



Wanted To Buy Farms. 

Any size or location. Cash buyers 
for all kinds. Send ne list, sixo 
j and price. 

Win. E. HAIRD, 
10-oct. Krlanger, Ky 

DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

aidk.DBNTISTMsV' 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work — 
pnliileHM extraction, bridge and plate 
work a apeclalty. 

All Work Ouaranteed 



•.riii 



FARMS * 




IP 



TAM YOt'W COUNTY I'APBR 



* 




§ Vol, xyx-xv 



Established 1875 



(WW? R ECORDER. 

JRL1NGTON. KENTUCKY, THURSDAY FEBRUARY 5, 1920 $1.50 Per \<*t 



$1.50 Per ^ ear 



No 19 




tast 



— 



They Sure -Are in Gsrmeny, 

Whsro$33lfMsrsry1500 

Silver Marks. 



Coblenx, Germany, January 16.— 
Money? Yes, oodles of it every 
month In these 'parte along the 
Rhine— for the doughboy with his 
33 iron men per - month. 

Bat 33 iron men, calculated in 
the German mark, is a 'mere hand- 
ful of silver— a handful of about 
1,900 marks. Bo when the Ameri- 
can soldier, who looks after Uncle 
•Barn's Jhtepests in the Army of 
Occupation, sallies forth on pay 
day. he Can do things with ravish 
hand. 

Not that the doughboy is nat- 
urally a spendthrift. When a 
fellow has the dough, he doesn't 
have to count the pennies. The 
doughboys doesn't count them. 

Does ho want a bottle of the 
finest Moselle wines that cornea 
from the grape-clad hills of this 
region? He. can get it by changing 
a very small part of his 33 per 
into native currency and never ev- 
en notice the hole. Does he want 
to buy curios from the shops for 
the folks back home? He can get 
*em by changing a few more of 
his 33 per, and still not feel the 
stringency. Even should he want 
to buy out half the shop he can 
come pretty near to doing it with 
his month's pay, and have enough 
left over to buy a thirty days' 
supply of cigarettes, soap and bar 
chocolate at the sales commia- 

of the 
don't cost 



Contract Not Let. 

County Judge N. B. Riddell and 
Justices of the Peace J. C. Bed- 
inger,. R. B. Tanflftr, Noah Tanner 
and r x J. i AylorF'?went to Prank- 
fort -last Fridatf ■ to be present at 
the letting of the contract for 
the construction of a concrete 
road from the railroad crossing in 
Brlanger to . the south corpora- 
tion line of the town of Florence 
in this county. For some cauae 
the contract was not let but will 
be later on. It appears that Boone 
county's portion of the cost' of 
the road will be *9,5Q0, while the 
town of Florence will have to 
raise about $016 more. Brlanger 
will have the big end of the cost 
of the road owing to the. fact 
that the road thru that town 
will be considerably wider than 
elsewhere. 

Bids for the construction work 
received, were as' follows: 
Moteland & O'Hearan $106,411.10 
F. A. Lewis' $102,63^.57 

Amer. ConscruCtibn Co. t90.t»5.53 
Vastine & Lowers $89,945.76 







!P 



ssry— and not miw a 

movies at the T, w 

him a cent anyway. 

The American soldier in this cor 
ner of the world is certainly lucky 
so far as money goes. The German 
mark, which before the war 
brought in the neighborhood of 
twenty-three cents, today brings 
less than two cents, l'resto— a mere 
ten dollar bill at the exchange 
table becomes a roll fat enough 
to choke the proverbial horse. 

The princely income of the 
doughboy in Germany is the won- 
der and envy of the conquered 
inhabitants. While the average 
German is paid in marks and buys 
in marks, the boy from Kankakee 
gets paid the equivalent of the 
real United States currency, and 
spends it as marks. It is nothing 
to marvel at If Heine thinks Uncle 
Sam's soldiers are made of money. 
. However, despite the fact that 
the doughboys are generally flush 
and able to buy almost anything 
within reason that they . desire, 
many of them are salting aWay 
their pay for other days. Thous- 
ailds of dollars are always on their 
way back to the States, to be 
banked against the homecoming 
of the senders. Better to spend it 
in the U. 8. A. than In Germany, 
say the provident boys 

But it sure seemo good to wan- 
der out on pay-day- with thirty- 

lree iron men, all in marks, 
fteen hundred of the local coin 
a long, long way, and few 
art* the doughboys who reach the 
end of the month "broke.'' 



Record Local Freight 

One morning last week the long- 
est freight train that ever passed 
over the Lawrf nceburg branch of 
the Big Four was pulled in. There 
were eighty-three cars, necessitat- 
ing three trips to Lawrenceburg 
function by the local freight, en- 
gine to bring them to town. In 
this connection it is gratifying to 
report that records at the Big 
Four office show that freight bus 
iness over this branch is the lar- 
gest in its history.— Lawrenceburg 
Register. 

REINSTATMENT 

Of War Risk Insurance Within 

Eighteen Months Still 

Holds Good. 



Perish ing Denies Alleged Waste 
of Lives Under Investiga- 
tion-Tells Why Or- 
ers Wont Thru. 

Official settlement of the ques- 
tion of whether lives of American 
soldiers were needlessly sacrific- 
ed on* the morning of Nov., 11th,' 
1918, before, the ' armistice • was 
signed, will result .from the re- 
port of the House committee in- 
vestigating expenditures in the 
War Department 



CHEAPER CLOTHES OUTLOOK. 

U BKOWajttag, tiWkral OfflciaffNs 



*t Tol fe By &? Men - 



■ 



. New York, Jan*. 28.— The wool 
market is rapidly approaching % 
normal, pre-war basis, and manu- 
facturer's demands for raw wool 
will be met in. full soon, accord- 
ing to Arthur Williams, L.-UM* 
Pood Administrator, who confer- 
red with representatives of the 
American Woolen Association here 

today. 

The encouraging outlook for 
cheaper clothing, Mr. Williams 
said, is further enhanced by a 
nearly normal commercial output 
by the nation's mills, which he 
said, devoted 61 per cent of their 
capacity during the war to mak- 
ing cloth for the army and navy. 
. The woolen experts told Mr. 
'Williams that a long stride to- 



WARPATH I BY 
LONDQNEDI 




Attempts to show that negli- i ward lowering the price of cloth- j 

ing would be made is , the purchas- 



/ I 



i 



Prevent Ove loading 

of Heavy Trucks. 

We are informed there is a huge 
truck on the Paris pike, which, it 
is alleged is overloaded and, as a 
result, has broken thru the pike 
and all four/ wheels have sunk to 
the. axle. The* driver, evidently 
realizing he was violating the 
law, has left It, and asth»'':ruck 
has no license tag upon it, the 
driver evidently took same with 
him to try to avoid arrest. War- 
rants have been issued , and offi- 
cers have gone to the scene. If 
no one shows up we think the of- 
ficials should unload the truck, so 
it, can be removed from Its pres- 
ent place, where it is blocking the 
traffic, and that it should then 
be placed in some garage with in- 
structions not to allow anyone to 
have it until the identification of 
the owner can be ascertained. This 
course, would, in our judgment, 
Vring matters to a head quickly 
and serve as an object lesabm to 
others. 

' Unless something is done and 
done quickly our pikes are going 
to be absolutely ruined by foreign 
truck drivers who have no regard 
for law or anything else, Al- 
ready it is estimated that more 
than fifty thousand dollars* worth 
of damage has been done Now 
the people pay for these pikes 
ana they ought not to Tbe de- 
stroyed by irresponsible and law- 
less truck drfvern and owners. 

If necessary we are in favor of 
hiring *a special officer whose 
sole duty shall be to arrest every 
man caught in Montgomery coun- 
ty violating thla law. The matter 
is serious and ought to be hand- 
led promptly and effectively — Mt, 
Sterling Sentinel-Democrat. 

Anxious to Get Moved. 

James D. Acra, of Locust Orove 
neighborhood, was transacting bus 
iness in Burlington last Friday. 
Mr Acra Is anxtou* to getmovoU 
to his property In Burlington, 
Wanting to get away from thn 
farm on which he has maided so 
lunar and tod s very avtlvv \US. 
excepting W. H. Marsh. It h« is 
toe oUJesl native rovidsnt of the 
on of hi* neighbor Ikond, 
„,* ownership of resJsstat* 
having cUasgW-sntkki >,|» 



To relieve any confusion that 
may exist in the minds of former 
service men on account of the 
special provision Of lapsed War 
Term Insurance which authorized 
reinstatement up to December 31, 
1919, regardless of date -of dis- 
charge,- announcement is. made by 
Director R. Q. Cholmeley-Jones of 
the Bureau of War Risk Insurance 
that the provisions for reinstate 
ment of lapsed or canceled insur- 
ance, within 18 months from date 
of discharge, upon payment of 
only two months' premiums on the 
amount of insurance 19 be rein- 
stated, provided the Insured in in 
as good health as at the date 
of discharge or expiration of the 
grace period whichever is the 
later date, and so states in his 
application, still hold good. 
" The provision that discharged 
service men are permitted to rein- 
state at any time within three 
calendar months following the 
month of discharge by merely 

Raying the two months' prem- 
ims, without making a former ap- 
plication or a statement as to 

health is also still in force. _ 

The provisions for reinstatement 
do not protect a man 'until he 
actually reinstates. If he waits he 
may not be in as good health as 
he was at the time of discharge 
and consequently may not be able 
to secure reinstatement. 

Don't put off reinstatement. Do 
it now! _ 

Never Knew a Better Man- 

The following letter was receiv- 
ed by D_E. Castleman, of Brlan- 
ger, from R. M. Dudley, who was 
a schoolmate of him and Rev. J. 
F. Williams at Georgetown. The 
letter was written at El Paso, 
Texas, January 27th : 

Dear Dave— I thought the enclos 
ed sermon delivered at the funeral 
of J. F. Williams at El Paso, Bap- 
tist church would be of interest to 
you. 

I have lived here with Frank for 
eight years, and I don't hesitate 
to say Frank Williams was the 
best man I ever saw. I make no 
exceptions. I have a brother who 
is a minister; had an uncle who 
•was a minister; had a father who 
was a devout good man, out I will 
always say Frank Williams was 
the best jfean I ever knew. 

He did a great work here and 
Is mourned by all creeds and clas- 
ses, andL I feel a very great per- 
sonal loss. Re has a grand fam- 
ily. I sorrow with you and his 
family In this great' loss to us 
all. 

Your friend and schoolmate, 
R If. DUDLEY. 

NOTICE. 

Bee H\ R. Leldy for DmIco Light and 
Power Plant who is nftw Delon ser- 
vice man In this emiiitj ; he will be 
glad to explains the necessity and 
oonven tenon of l>«-lei> Lights. 

Florence, Ky. R. D. 
Phono, Burlington 816. ' 



DELCO-UGHT 



genee on the part t of officers in 
nigh commands in the A. E. F. 
was responsible for an unwarrant 
ed loss of lives in tne ranks of 
the United States fighting forces 
in action on the memorable day 
are being made by Colonel Georgo 
An sell, special counsel for the 
committee. 

Gen. Pershing denies these con- 
tentions, in a letter addressed to 
Representative Alvin T. Fuller, of 
Massachusetts. In this communi- 
cation the A. B. F. chief , states 
that orders for attacks were with- 
drawn as soon as possible after 
he was advised of the signing of 
the armistice. Statements that 
American troops were ordered to 
attack while French troops re- 
mained stationary are declared er- 
roneous by the general. 

General Pershing said he had no 
knowledge, before 6 a. m. of No- 
vember 11, that the armistice had 
been signed, and that firing was 
to cease at 11 a. m. that day. The 
armistice was not signed untif 5 
a. m. 

Referring to rumors of the Ar- 
mistice which began circulating 
November 7, Gen. Pershing saya 
the Armies took steps to correct 
same. The enemy was disorganiz- 
ed and withdrawn, and it was im- 
portant to maintain and haste- 
action. 

Neither British nor French or- 
dered firing to cease prior to the 
going into effect of the armistice ; 
and, in general, firing- by all the 
allies and by the enemy continu- 
ed on the whole front until the 
armistice hour, 11 a. m. November 
11th. 

"Neither the French nor the 
Americans were regardless of wast 
age of men at any time,'' says Gen 
Pershing, and adds that "Ameri- 
can lives were not wasted unless 
it be that we had not adequately 
prepared for war in time of 
peace." 

Maj. Gen. John H. Sherburne, 
commander of the 92d Artillery, 
Second Army, which held a posi- 
tion on the Mease-Argonme front, 
upholds Col. Ansell'y contentions. 

When questioned about the mat- 
ter Gen. Sherburne" said : 

"The French commanderB .dirt 
not move forward either on No- 
vember 10 or 11. French command- 
ing officers expressed horror at 
the unnecessary Waste of life 
The day after the armistice com- 
ment was free and it was said then 
there would be an investigation 
by Congress, but it was said Con- 
gress would not get around to the 
investigation for a year or so and 
the sacrifice' would be forgotten 
by then." 

COUNTY FARM BUREAU 



would confine himself to standard 
styles and plain, service materials, 
instead of demanding the market's 
best. 

High clothing prices, in the as- 
sociation's opinion, have reached 
their crest. The conferees told 
Mr. Williams that "any specula- 
tive Jobber who might be holding 
back his stocks in the hope of 
higher prices will be disappointed, 
for the normal requirements of 
the trade soon will be met di- 
rectly Trom the manufacturer.'' 

A Welcome Visitor. 

Renewing her subscription to the 
Recorder Alice Furcliff, of Ft. 
Wayne, Ifld., says: "Your paper 
seems like a welcome weekly vis- 
itor from my dear Old Kentucky 
Home." _ 

GREAT PASTOR 

TO BE CALLED. 

Dr. Jones in "National Pulpit" 
Here— Plan of Christian 

Church. 



Hleutrlc Until and pow«r for leu t&an 
"you «r« pay ing for poor light. 




POAWt A. \STffkMXX, 

t*i»iw In Ixioo-MIM rroSucM. rseso 

•sulfa' t «•■»«** <#»>■■■ By 



Will Effect Permanent Organization 
Saturday, February 7th. 

The membership campaign ^for 
the Boone County Farm Bureau 
ending Jan. 2fth, was hindered 
gieatly by the continued sleet 
and slick pikes. Several Important 
meetings were called off or post- 
poned. The solicitors who were 
working in their respective neigh- 
borhoods were not able to get 
over the pikes to give persons an 
opportunity to Join. 

It had been planned to make a 
permanent: organization at the cen 
tral meeting held at Burlington 
Tuesday, Jan. 87th, but since this 
meeting was not known in pre- 
cincts where meetings had been 
postponed, and as the Farm 
Bureau is county wide, it was 
voted to .defer election of, per- 
manent officers and executive 
members from the twelve pre- 
cincts until Saturday Feb. 7th, 10 
a. m. incorporation papers consti- 
tution and by-laws and plan of 
work will be adopted at this 
meeting. In the mean time Farm 
Bureau meetings will be held at 
the following points in the coun- 
ty: 

Rabbit Hash, i p. an., Thursday 
Feb. 5th 

Petersburg, 7:30 p. m., Thursday 
Feb. 5th. 

Union, 1 p. m., Fridsy Feb 6th. 

Walton, 7:W p. m.,- : Friday Feb* 
6th. * 

Every one Interested in the Farm 
Bureau should make it his duty to 
see that the masting in hlsnelgh- 
iborhood is well attended. The 
Farm ISureau. la county wide and 
will lx> of mutual benefit to every 
precinct. 

The success and value of the 
Farm Bureau to the farmers of 
the county will rest largely with 
the executive members you elect 
at the central meeting in burling- 
ton next Saturday at 11 a. m Ev- 
ery member should cone and lts«i 
a hand In making this n norma* 
nent orirtsMMtloa. every solicitor 
i. u r»W le^nistV ■ fuir rvMPt 
of final!*** WKmrsd. The IsOWJ V 
Hurunfton Hptgfc church will 

SMHStONNSe. 
biMiiiy Sssistsi 7 



The Christian Chureh or Dis- 
ciples of Christ, one of the five 
largest Protestant denomination 3 
is to establish a "national pulpit' 
in this city. The Central Christian 
Church on Cass Park, the largest 
of v the several flourishing pari ahes 
the denomination has in this city, 
is about to isjue a formal call to 
the Rev. Edgar De Witt Jones, cit- 
ed by the "Homiletic Review' as 
one of the six greatest preacheru 
of the world. Dr. Jones is an auth- 
or as well as the foremost pulpi- 
tarian of his denomination. Writ- 
ings of his like. "The Wiadom of 
God's Fools," "Fair hope, the An- 
nals of a Country Church,'' "The 
Tender Pilgrims,' 1 are among the 
best sellers of the religious book 
shelves today. 

At a special meeting of the of- 
ficial board of the Central Chris- 
tian Church the past week, it was 
unanimously voted ,to recommend 
to the congregation that it ex- 
tend a caff to Dr. Jones. On next 
Monday evening the congregation 
will hold its annual meeting and 
undoubtedly wiU comply with the 
recommendation. 

Dr. "Jones is a Texan by birth 
andjjtarted out to be a lawyer. 
He studied law in the University 
of Missouri and Tranalyvania Uni- 
versity. He seemed destined for a 
brilliant career at the bar when 
he "experienced religion'' and de- 
cided to abandon faw for themin- 
I istry. Be was ordained a minister 
of the Christian denomination in 
1901. His first charge waa in Ei— 
langer, Ky. ; his second his Frank- 
lin Sircle Church, Cleveland, and 
his third, the First Church of 
Bloomington, 111. There he has re- 
mained 14 years. 

Dr. Jones was honored by being 
chosen the presiding officer of the 
national conference of Christian 
churches three successive times. 
He has also been president of the 
International Conference of the 
denomination. He was a delegate 
to the World's Missionary Confer- 
ence, in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 
1919. He is a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, a member of the 
Author's League of America and 
of Kappa Sigma— Detroit News, 
January 5th. _ 

SUGAR GM BARRED. 

Consumer Hit 100 Per Cent 
Profits, Figures Show. 

Washington, Jan. 30. — Evidence 
that Jobbers wholesalers and re- 
tail dealers are dividing a profit 
of more than 100 per cent on sugar 
at SO cents a pound was found 
today In reports to the U. 8. De- 
partment of Commerce. 

The 'reports showed, thst, In De- 
cember, %% cents per pound ».u 
the price at which American re 
flners sold sugar for export from 
the United States 

During the same, month th - 

Srlee charged by retail dealers in 
> cities averaged 1H» cents per 
pound, showinjr that after the 
sugar left the refineries «•, cen is 
Was added to each pound *old. 

The average price quoted was 
compiled by the Labor Depart- 
ment Bureau el Statistics from re- 
*port» ol hundreds ol price report- 

In msny eittM th* retort price 



Who Cute Loose With Bitter 
Attack on United States, 



London, Jan. 2«.— The following 
article, in this week's idsue of 
John Bull, written by its editor, 
Horatio Bottamley, a member of 
Parliament and an influential Brie 
ish journalist, speaks for itself: 

"I am fad up with Unelfc? Sam. 
The time has come for plain 
speaking. I see no reason to flat- 
ter the vanity of this strutting 
race by Lauding its part in the war, 
hailing the American President as 
a genius in world politics and pre- 
tending to discover in Washing- 
ton virtues absent from every 
European capital. 

"What was the attitude of the 
United States when the Kaiser 
struck his blow at the independ- 
ence of Beglium? The sham of 
American inaction in that fatal 
hour will stand forever as a mon- 
ument of infamy before which, in 
the centuries to come, every de- 
cent American should hang his 
head in shame. 

"While the United States Gov- 
ernment procalimed neutrality, ev- 
ery factory and arsenal hummed 
with activity so that her coffers 
might be swelled with gold from 
the allies. 

*»Yet from a million lips and a 
thousand news sheets men hear 
and read today the lie that 
"America won the war.'' 

"The truth is that throughout 
the first three years of the strug- 
gle America wanted to ( see which 
way the fortunes of war inclined, 
so as finally to come in on the 
winning side. 

"Before the Judgment bar of 
history the figures that strutted 
so largely upon the stage at 
Washington will be dwarfed into 
insignificance alongside Clemen- 
ceau and Lloyd George. 

"In England and France the hour 
produced a man ; in America they 
had to get along with a few 
pygmies and a professor.'' 



HEART TO JART TALK 

ReV. O. C. Peyton, D. D. 
"Heaven and earth shall pass 
away, but my words shall not pass 
away.' 1 This is the utterance of 
Jesus Christ, the eternal son of 
God. How our human hearts do 
long for the abiding, the perma- 
nent. Look and see the pryamids, 
the mausoleums, the lofty and 
costly moniments. What does it 
all mean? Men are seeking to abide 
in the minds of future ages. But, 
alas, nothing human long abides. 
"Change and decay on all .around 
we see.'' But the words of Jesus 
will abide forever. Yea, he himself 
says that heaven and earth shall 
pass away, but his words shall not 
pass away. Heaven and earth arc 
the handiwork of God. If the 
words of Christ prove more stable 
than these, be must be divine. 



Rushing The Weed. 

There was a rush of tobacco 
growers from this neighborhood 
to the Walton market last week. 
Some of them received gooa 
prices for their product while 
others got a price that was be- 
low the cost of production. There 
certainly is a very small percent 
of the 1919 crop remaining in the 
hands of the growers in the Bur- 
lington district. 

Will Have Sale On 12th Inst 

J. Wood Riggs, of Pt. Pleasnst 
neighborhood, has sold his farm 
to Mr. Beick, who recently sold 
the Geo. E. Rouse farm, and will 
have a sale on the 12th of this 
month. Mr. Riggs' physical condi- 
tion is such that he can not at- 
tend to a farm and he is com- 
pelled to seek some other em- 
ployment. 

A New Departure. 

The Carroll county fiscal court 
has made a new departure in the 
management of public roads, and 
each Justice of the Peace has been 
appointed a committee to super- 
vise lepairs and maintenance of 
roads in his district. The county 
will sell from 950,000 to .-$100,000 
worth of county road bonds. 



FINE TYPE ARMY OFFICER 

He Is a Man, Human Being, and 
Thoroughly Conversant -With 
Dstails of His 



In an address recently deliver- 
ed before a body of young offi- 
cers at Fort Riley, Kansaa, who 
were hist asauming active com- 
mand of men, Col. C. A, Bach, U. 
S. A., a man who rose to his pres- 
ent place from the ranks, outlin- 
ed in at vital maimer the present 
day meaning of leadership in the 
new democratic peace-time Army. 

This address made such an im- 
pression on his audience that 
scores of the young officers be- 
sieged Col. Bach for copies, and 
through these same- officers the 
speech is finding wide circulation 
tnruout the Army— among both, 
officers and enlisted men. 

Col. Bach said : 

"To lead, you must know— you 
may 'bluff all of your men some 
of the time, but you can't do it 
all the time. Men sill not have 
confidence in an officer unless 
he knows his business, and he 
must know it from the grouna 



up. 

''The officer should know more 
about paper work than his first 
sergeant and company clerk put 
together; he should know more 
about messing than his mess ser- 
geant; more about diseases of the 
horse than his troop farrier. 

"If the officer does not know, 
and demonstrates the fact that he 
does not know, it is entirely hu- 
man for the soldier to say *o 
himself: "To hell with him. He 
doesn't' know as- much about this 
as I do, and calmy disregard the 
instructions received. 

"There is no substitute for ae^ 
curate knowledge. Because so weU 



Those who believe in him, love , informed that men will hunt you 



him and truly desire to honor 
him find boundless joy, peace, 
strength and comfort in the 
thought, that the words of Christ 
are to abide forever. 

This assertion of Christ Jesus 
has been proven -true His worda 
have stood the test of bitter op- 
position. They have been hated 
through nearly all these nineteen 
centuries. Bitter, relentless, ener- 
getic, only skillful opponents have 
arisen and striven to impeach his 
words All such oppoaition has 
been utterly ineffective. There 
have been literary attacks like 
Lucian, the master of satire, in hU 
day There have been iearnei at*, 
tacks like Celsius. There have been 
physical attacks like the Roman 
Emperor Diocletian. , All the ar- 
tillery of science, literature, pol- 
itics, sarcasm, ridicule have been 
used to destroy the wordB of 
Christ. Still they endure and 
ever will. They have stood the 
test of time. That is the surest 
of all tests What seemed wisdom 
once today is seen today to be 
folly. Ptolemy was the greatest 
astronomer in his time. His theo- 
riec are laughes c today. So 
with hosts of others. But the 
words of Jesus Christ are peren- 
nial in their beauty, sweetness, 
fragrance and strength. They will 
endure forever. They ,have been 
examined, analysed, pulled to 
pieces Still do they abide! They 
abide the teats of severs and 
critical study. Here is a- mine-sb- 
solutely inexhaustible. "Heaven 
and earth shall pass away but 
my word shaU not pass away.'' Oh, 
blessed, Messed trdth 1 You, dear, 
friend, can be linked with some- 
thing abiding. Heed the words of 
Jesus. Accept) him as saviour, 
friend, guide, and you, like him, 
shall abide forever. 

Union, Ky. 

Good Sale of Tobecoo. 

Charles Beemon,. ol Petersburg 
precinct, sold his crop of 1,940 
pounds of tobacco on the Aurora 
loose leaf market last Thursday at 
an average of >54 09. This crop was 
raised on one and a quaiter acres 
of land. Mr. Beemon is well pleas- 
ed with the price he received 
and wiU produce more pounds of 
the weed this 



hslrssle oHo* ol sugar Was 



ISM asat*. 



Order* to ket>D the fhihlrsn at 
home to avoid tils spread of scar- 
*v*. vsr-riSd nte*;*^ 

• IMul 



.&» 




up to ask questions; that your 
brother officers will say to one 
amnher: 4 Ask Smith— he knows* 

"An officer should never apol- 
ogize to his men; also an officer 
should never be guilty of an act 
for which bis sense of justice tells 
him he should apologize. 

"Another element in gaining 
moral ascendency lies in the pos- 
session of enough physical vital- 
ity and endurance to withstand 
the hardships to which you and 
your men are subjected, and a 
dauntless spirit that enables you 
to not only accept them cheerily, 
but to minimize their magnitude. 

"Be an example to your men. 
An officer cant be a power for 
good or a power for evil. Don't 
preach to them— that will be 
worse than useless/ Live the kind 
of life you would have them lead 
and you will be surprised to see 
the number that will imitate you. 

"A loud-mouthed, profance cap- 
tain who is careless of his per- 
sonal appears nos will have a 
loud-mouthed, profane, dirty com 
pany. Remember what I tell you. 
Your company wiU be the reflec- 
tion of yourself. If you have a 
rotten company it will be be- 
cause you are a rotten captain. 

"Self-sacrifice is essential to 
leadership. You. will give, give all 
the Ume. You wUl give of your- 
self physically, for the longest 
hours, the hardest work, ar, i the 

i greatest responsibility is r* the 
ot of the captain. He is' the 
first man up in the morning and 
the last man in the night. He 
works while others sleep. j 

"You will give of yourself men* 
tally, in sympathy and apprecia- 
tion for t lie troubles of men In 
Jour charge. This one's mother 
m» died, and that one has lost 
all his savings in a hank failure. 
They may desire help, but more 
than anything else they desire 
sympathy, 

"Don't make the mistake of 
turning such men down with the 
statement that you have trouble* 
of your own, for every time you 
do you knock a stone out of the 
foundation of your house. 

"And by doing ah ihese things 
you arc breathing lifo Into what 
would be otherwise a mor*> ma- 
chine. You are creating a •*»«*' 
iu your organisation that will ma ka 
the mass rttfuoad u> ><>u «» the 
it were uue wan And thai ui 
•Sprit." , 

There wdi be s bumpor crop sf 
tobacco piiched In i»«..me cuiotlf 
th* yesr 






THURSDAY FEB 5, 1920. 



flOONg COUNTY KJBCOJKDlir 



.* 



IV 



tHx 



Hmertcan Legion Dance 

postponed from 

'January 28th 

will be given 

f riday, f ebruary 1 3, 1 920 

at t O. O. f. Ball, 

florence, Kentucky 

HU Legion Members and their 
friends Invited. 

JMusic-Saxapbone Crio 

Dancing 8:30 to 1:30. 







WALTON. 






Forest Brown of Grant, attend 
ed the tobacco sales here last 
week having some on the market 
from his farm. 

Joseph Rich, aged 89 years, died 
at his home near Piner, Jan. 20th. 
Mrs. Carl Neumei»ter of near this 
place in his daughter. 

Robert L. Hayes who has been 
employed by Brittenhelm Bros., 
the past year left last week for 
Los Angeles, Cala., to make hia 
home. 

Edward E. Fry, of the firm of 
Franks & Fry, spent part of fast 
week in Louisville attending the 
annual meeting of the State Hatd- 
ware Association. 

Miss Anna Hudson has accept- 
ed a~ position with the clerical 
force of the Walton Bank and 
Trust Company, and will make a 
valuable addition to that institu- 
tion. _ 

H. H. Huston of Anchorage, 
spent Sunday here with his many 
friends. He is still traveling for 
the L. and N. Railroad in the ca- 
pacity of auditor and is giving the 
best of satisfaction. 

The announcement of the K. of 
P's expecting to hold a district 
meeting at Walton, on Thursday, 
Feb. 5th, has been withdrawn as 
the lodge here felt that it could 
not properly the meeting at this 
time. 

Kirby West who has been locat- 
ed at Constantinople, Turkey, with 
the American Expeditionary Force 
in the capacity of civil engineer, 
spent part of last week here via- 
iting his motherM rs. Julia West. 
He is married and his wife re- 
sides in New Jersey. 

Wilford M. Rice who has been 
employed in the clerical force of 
the Fifth-Third Nationaf Bank, in 
Cincinnati, will open the bank at 
Hebron, Boone county, about the 
first of March, and is now learn- 
ing the ropes of how to handle 
the business at the Equitable Bank 
and Trust Co. 

Miss Melva White has demon- 
strated that good lemons can be 
raised in this climate tho per- 
haps not on such an extensive 
scale as in Florida. LaBt week 
she took one from a lemon tree 
that she was growing at her resi- 
dence that weighed 11% ounces, 
and is a fine specimen of that 
fruit. 

Boone Finnell, a life long resi- 
dent of Walton, was stricken v. ith 
paralysis last Saturday morning 
near the L. and N. Railroad de- 
pot where he was going to get 
some freight for fl. K. Watson. 
He fell to the ground but was 
soon carried into the depot and 
afterwards taken to the residence 
of his «iater Mrs A. R. Hance 
where he died a short time af- 
terwards. Dr. G.. C. ttankins waa 
called but could do nothing for 
him as he was past human aid. 
Mr. Finnell was 61 years old and 
was born and reared here. The 
funeral took place Sunday after- 
noon the remains being interred 
at Old Salem cemetery near Wal- 
ton. 

The tobacco market the past 
week has been dull and low in 
price all over the State and at 
Walton the average in price went 
away down in comparison to what 
has been paid the earlier part of 
the season. This was largely due 
to the very inferior quality of 
tobacco being offered, as most 
of tbB, good quality has been mar 
ketedf and the superior grades are 
what made the high averages 
Bach of the Walton warehouses 
had about 100,000 pounds on sale 
at each sale the past week. On 
Wednesday the Waltpn warehouse 
sold nearly 100,000 pounds at an 
average of nearly 25 cents, and 
the Farmers had about the same 
kind of a sale on Thursday. The 
rejections have been very " heavy 
on account of tho low prices and 
some have decided to hold their 
crops for a while as the market 
has been overcrowded and there 
is about 400,000 pounds at the 
Walton warehouses awaiting a 
sale. About two million pounds of 
tobacco have been sold at Walton 
by the two warehouses this sea- 
son since the owning of the mar- 
ket in December The prospect for 
so increase in price for the com 
mon grade* and especially the red 
tobacco 1* out very promising 

M. L. fc«Wey, the proprietor of 
taa Walton Electric I'lmii, has 
ape* offered a fine position in *u 
ounce re at Vuu-eom* 



©falsified Qduertisemenfs. 

For Sale— FRESH MILK COWS 
AT ALL TIMES. 

n CLAUD CONNER, 

LUDLOW R. D. 2, 
Near Pt. Pleasant church, Boone 
County, Ky aug. 20 



For Sale— Stack mixed hay, and 
five year old horse broke to work. 
J. Stanley \itz, Burlington R. D 
No. 2. 

For Sale— Two high grade Jer- 
i sey cows, two Duroc Jersey sows 
i to farrow soon, one pure bred 
bull and several fine boar pigs. 
These are priced right. AH No. 1 
animals, no culls. S. B. Ryle, Jer- 
sel Hill Farm, Grant, Ky., R.D.I. 



For Sale— Cow and calf. R. C 
McGlasson, BurUngtotn R. D. 3. 



For Sale— Two turkey hens and 
gobbler. Mrs. Thos. Hensley, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. D. 1. 



For Sale— Eight or ten tons of 
r.ice baled timothy hay. Geo. Penn, 
Burlington, Ky. 



For Sale— Good feather bed. Mrs. 
A. W. Corn, Erlanger. 

as he saj'a he is hardly making a 
living here. He is a very valua- 
ble man in a community and 
gives the public fine service with 
his electric plant, but the trou- 
ble is he does not charge enough 
for his service. The town of Waf- 
ton gives him only JBOOOa month 
for the street lighting and it is 
worth double that, and his chargo 
of 15 cents per kilowat for house 
lighting is not enough considering 
the way everything has advanced 
especially oil and gasoine. Hehaa 
a good patronage but he com- 
plains that there are a great 
many who can afford electric 
lighting that have not put it in 
their residences and thia patron- 
age should be given the plant. If 
the electric plant was discontin- 
ued at Walton the propetty values 
would depreciate at least 25 per 
cent, inside of three months. Ev- 
ery effort should be made to re- 
tain Mr. Kelley and the electric 
light plant, and it is up to the 
people to do it. 



sold my farm known as The N'Yanza Farm, situated 
on the Dixie Highway, 2 1-2 miles of Florence, Ky., 
as I do not expect to farm any more, I will sell on 

RINim 20, 

beginning at 10 a. m., o'clock to the highest bidder, 

The following property towit: 

Horses, Mules, Hogs, Sheep* 
and Farm Implements. 

AUTOMOBILE— Ford Sedan, equipped with electric star- 2 pair check lines, 2 leather halters, leather saddle, 5 pitch- 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ a 

a BELLBVIEW. a 

♦ a 



W. C. Akin and family have 
moved to Indiana. 

Mrs. Richmond's children are re- 
covering from scarlet fever. 

Mrs. A. S- Burcham and children 
were Sunday guests of Mra. J. J. 
Maurer. 

Miss Laura Whitenack returned 
from her home at Harrodsburg, 
Sunday. 

Linnie Love and family, of near 
Union, spent Monday with Mrs. 
Belle Cason. 

Pepper Smith is able to be out 
again after a severe wrestle with 
a carbuncle on his neck. 

Word reached here last week 
that Capt. Ed. Maurer and ■ wife, 
of Pittsburgh, were quite III of 
influenza. 

T. W. Cook and family spent last 
Saturday night and Sunday with 
their daughter, Mrs. Chas. White, 
of Petersburg. 

Mr. and Mrs J. G. Smith and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Casern 
and daughter, Mrs. Belle Cason 
son and daughter, spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cason on 
Middle creek. 

Ralph Cason has accepted the 
position of assistant cashier at the 
bank here and he and his family 
are residents of our village. 

C. W. Goodridge haB moved to 
Covington and will work for the 
Andrews Steel Plant in Newport 
at a nice salary. The Recorder 
wishes Mr. Goodridge abundance 
of success in his new position. His 
address is 1706 Banklick street. 



ter, shock-absorber, wire wheels, condition compartively as 
good as new. 

HORSES — One bay horse 10 years old; roan mare 10 or 12 
years old ; black horse 9 years old ; mule 10 years old ; horse 
mule 2 years old; 2 mare mules coming one year old. 

COWS— Jersey cow and calf; one black Guernsey cow. 

HOGS — 3 sows and pigs, 9 sows to farrow in March. 

SHEEP — 95 stock Ewes, most of them 2 and 3 years old, 
will be sold 16 in a bunch. 2 Hampshire Bucks. 

CHICKENS— 75 fine hens and 2 Rhode Island roosters. 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS— Hoosier com drill with fer- 
tilizer attachment, rolling harrow, iron land roller, Oliver 
three-horse riding turning plow, 2 No. 20 Oliver left hand 
plows, Oliver cultivator, 3 double shovel plows, 2 jointers for 
No. 20 plow, 2 jumping shovel plows, sprayer attached to 
barrel, 7-horse coal oil engine with grinder complete, 3 sets 
buggy harness, set heavy spring wagon harness, 4 sets of 



forks, 6 bridles, hay-fork, pulley and ropes complete, lot tim- 
oth seed, pair platform scales, lot baled timothy hay, hay 
trame, 40-tooth harrow, "A" harrow, 5 empty water bar- 
rels, 2 bundles fence wire, lot pressed brick, large cooking 
kettle and frame, hay rake, wagon pump. 2 large tarpaulins, 
set of extension ladders, chest of carpenters tools, 2 50-gal. 
oil tanks, barrel half full machine oil, nammock, lot trace 
chains, 2 pair sheep shears, plant setter, 2 potato diggers, 2 
hand rakes, seed sower, fence stretcher, wagon jack, sand 
screen, cement tamper, 4 post hole diggers, 2 scythes and 
sneeds, 5 shovels, 2 pair stretchers, 2 doubletrees, trippletree, 
6 singletrees, porch tarpaulin, 3 cross-cut saws, one-man 
saw, buck saw, lot tobacco canvas, lot of junk consistiong of 
old iron and rubber casings, piece of wire rope, pipe vice, 
bench wrench, grass seed stripper, hay knife, anvil, 15 gal- 
lon iron kettle, 2 grind stones. 

VEHICLES — No. 3 Columbus wagon comparatively good 
as new, good log wagon, spring wagon, open surrey, ,2 sets 
running gears suitable for spring wagons, 2 -horse sled, log 
sled. 



heavy spring wagon harness, 15 horse collars, 5 pair names, 

Household and Kitchen Furniture. 



One Cabel Solid Mahogany Inner-player Piano, good as 
new, sells for $700; oak bedroom suite, four posted solid wal- 
nut canopy top bed, Bent Wood churn, large heating stove. 



Kitchen table, lot of brooms, sewing machine, 2 small can- 
non stoves, one room size rug, No. 4 1-2 cream separator, 
never been used more than one month. 



zrc 



md oootonniait* vltMln K 

nUurt at W*Jto \ t»d «c~ 

«apttaf tWpMMM at VH § »u ae« 



Last Sunday when the sun was 
sinning so nicely plant bed talk 
was on every one's tongue, but 
WedoMdAjr morning's w««uthor dia- 
pi-rsed all thoughts along that 
lire 

•i <i Smith recaived word one 
day tha firs' <>f the week than 
hji brother, William, of Louls- 
MlU , is dangtM-ounly til of whoop- 
ing cough and pneumonia. 

Miss LUatc Rogorj Utat * j.uir 
ol iM>M>-f lasM* U«t Monday and 
the finder w u l ounftr a favor h» 
returning them to her 



TERMS OIF S-A^LiLcu.. 

All sums of $15.00 and under, cash; all sums above that amount will be given 
12 months time without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved secu- 
rity, negotiable and payable in Florence Deposit Bank, before removin property 

Arrangements will be made for trains Nos. 28 and 27 to stop at Devon there you will be met 
by automobiles to take you to the sale. 

J. B. SANDERS. 

Lunch will be served by the Ladies of the Hopeful Aid Society. 



"We ought to make a hit 5 ' 

—Chesterfield 

AND why not? Never 
• were fine tobaccos 
so skillfully blendedl 
Chesterfields bring you 
the besfcpi Turkish and 
Domestic leaf, blended 
to bring out new de- 
lights of flavor. 



Satisfactory Glasses 

Our glasses" are comfortable when 
fitted, and we keep Ibem so for you 
free of charge. Any time they get 
bent or out of sbape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 

Phone Sooth 1746 

DR. N. F. PENN,6i 3 Ma^S^'&fSfrm. Ky 





esterfield 



CIGAIU I lis 












r*n to 



All Tha AcU Irt TM« lauiu*. 



LUTE BRADFORD 

-♦AUCTIONEER- 

Is well posted on prices, has a wide acquaintance and 
knows all the good buyers. 

Live Stock Sales a Specialty 

Can Give all the Reference You Want. 
Farmara Phens. TERMS REASONABLE. 

FLORENCE, KY., R. D. 



Only $1.50 the Year 



> 



BOOKS C0DKT7 RECORDER 



THURSDAY FEB 5, 19*. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rev. O. C Peyton, D. D., Pastor. 
Preaohing every Sunday morning. 

And evening. 
JJibt« tichool every Sunday at 10 a. 
in. -Sum Allen, Superintendent 

•fif A cordial invitation is extended 
to all our Ber-'icos. 

Mrs. Susan Kirkpatrick is nurs- 
ing Mm Elza Poston. 



V 



\ 



i 



: Ground Hog wjnter began Tues- 
day hight and Wednesday. 



Hubert Rouse a 
last week with f: 
Ohio. 



nt several days 
da in Hartwbil, 



E. K. Stephens, of Bnllittsville, 
made this office a business call, 
Tuesday. 

Edgar C. Riley, of Petersburg, 
■was a business visitor to Burling- 
ton last Friday. 

Omor Porter sold his 50 acre.? of 
land out on the Belleview pike to 
Sol Winkle for 15,000. 



W. lr. B. House, of the Limaburg 
neighborhood, was a business call- 
er at this office last Friday. 

Judge John M. Lasting came In 
Sunday night from St. Petersburg, 
Florida, for an indefinite stay. 



Owen Blankenbeker and wife, of 
Union, were among the business 
visitors to Burlington last Tues- 
day. __^_^___ 

J>r. Yelton aold a pair of'roules 
for WOO to one of the Rogers boys 
in Belleview neighborhood a few 
dasy ago. _^^______ 

B. C. Oraddy and Jaa. T. Gaines, 
of Idlewild neighborhood, are in- 
stalling I>eIco fight plants in their 
residences. 



Master Robert Heneley, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thoa, Hensley, 



on of 
who 
has been very ill the past week 
is now improving. 



J. W. White, of Flickertown, was 
on the Walton tobacco market 
last Monday and reported the 
market booming. 



There was no meeting of the 
County Board of Education last 
Tuesday owing to the illnetM of 
two or three of the members. 



Pioi. J. A. Cay wood, Miss Sheba 
Roberts and Mrs. Chaa. A. Fowler 
have influenza. It seems that Bur- 
lington is in for it this time. 



Judge Gaines spent last Thurs- 
day with his brother, Jamea, of 
Petersburg precinct, he being con 
to Tub 



f 



IE 



D 



I Lead In Prices. 



GROCERIES. 

Liberty Bell Flour, per barrel » $13.50 

24 Pound Sack 1.75 

12 Pound Sack 90c 

Granulated Sugar, per pound 16c 

Hand-packed White Fish, 101b. bucket 1 .40 

Navy Beans, per pound 10c 

Try a lb. of Nobetter Coffee— the old reliable. . .45c 

Dried Apples, Dried Peaches, Apricots, Prunes, Grain 
Hominy, Flake Hominy, and a choice selection of 
canned Goods at very reasonable prices. 

MILL FEED. 

Tuxedo Chops, per cwt $3.15 

Dairy Sweets, per cwt 3.40 

A fine quality of mixed feed, per cwt 2.85 

Hog Feed, per cwt 3.80 

Egg Mash, per cwt 4.00 

All kinds of other feeds at a price accordingly. 

\ AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES. 

Diamond Tread Goodyear Tires 30x3! $19.50 

Goodrich Nobby Tread Tires 30x3 \ 19.00 

Other sizes in stock— Prices Accordingly. 

DRY GOODS*. 

A Real Nice Line to Select from. 

Latest Patterns of Dress Ginghams, per yd 28c 

Fancy Apron Ginghams, per yd 28c 

Calico, nice assortment, per yd 25c 

Sheeting, Crash, Shirting, Muslin, Ribbon, Sansilk, 

Crochet, and Knitting Cotton, Braids, and other articles, 

in Dry Goods at reasonable prices. 
HARDWARE- A complete line of all kinds of Hard- 
ware and Farm Machinery, such as Tractors, Farm Wa- 
gons, Harrows, Plows, Cultivators. Anything you need 
in this line I have in stock* 

HARNESS— Full sets of Harness, Buggy Harness, Col- 
lars, Checklines, and any part of harness you may need. 

I carry the most complete line of any store in the county. 
You will find my prices right on anything in my store. 
GIVE ME A CALL. 




Northern Kentucky's Greatest Store. 



D 




Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



fined 



home with Jaundice. 



Miss Kathryn Sullivan, of Com- 
missary neighborhood, entered 
Deaconess Hospital, Cincinnati, 
last Sunday to take a course In 
nursing. 

H. L. Tanner and wife, ofHoe- 
ful neighborhood, were early call 
ers at this office last Monday 
morning. 



neighbor, 
Verona 



S. L. Craven and Ida 
Mr. Garvey, both of the 
neighborhood, made the Recorder 
a call last Saturday while in Bur- 
lington. 

F. F. Robinson, of Richwood 
neighborhood, was a business vis- 
itor to Burlington last Tuesday, 
and while in town made the Re- 
corder a call. 



w 



L. KIRKPATRICK, 

Burlington, Ky. ^ 

=IOEZ3E \ jfl 



vi 



Henry Clore, of Florence R. D.. 
was a caller at this office one 
day the past week. The very bad 
weather has kept Mr. Clore close 
to his house all winter. 

• J. W. Sebree, of . Locust Grove 
neighborhood, was a visitor to 
Burlington last Friday, having 
been kept close to home all the 
new year by the bad weather. 

Boone County Jersey Cattle Club 
will meet in Burlington on Thurs- 
day, February 12th. All 'the 
members and persona Interested 
in Jersey cattle are requested to 
be present. 

G. G» Hughes, who is making hia 
home in Petersburg with his 
daughter, Mrs. Earl Walton, spent 
last Friday in Burlington, and his 
friends were glad to see him look- 
ing eo Well. 

Rev. S. T. Hill, of the RichwooJ 
neighborhood, made the Recorder 
a brief call last Friday. Rev. Hill 
recently returned from a short 
but very pleasant visit in Mem- 
phis, Tennessee. 

O. N. «cott, one of Petersburg's 
hustling citt*e»s\ made the Recor- 
der a business call last Friday. 
Besides realeatate Mr. Scott is 
handling automobiles, and believes 
he has the best one in the mar- 
ket. 

Attorney Jno L. Vest, of Wal- 
ton, spent last Friday at theCoun 
ty Clerk's office delving Into the 
ancient records to discover, if he 
could find any imperfection In a 
land title he was called upon to 
inv%tigat e. 

Last Monday Dr. Yelton bought 
of Stanley Rddins the property ho 
recently purchased of George O. 
Hughes. Consideration said to be 
¥9,000. Mr. Hughes sold the prop- 
erty only a few weeka ago to 
, Stanley Kddins (Or 17,000. 

Oraer Porter received word Tuea 
day morning that hia' grandmoth- 
er, Mra. Sarah Pace, died tluit 
morning at her home In Indlana- 
lis She had been an Invalid 



Established 1886. 

Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

Our record of more than a third 

of a Century insures the safety 

of your Funds and Satisfaction to 

you, if you choose us as your de- 

pository. . 

N. E. RIDDELL, President. 
W. A. GAINES, Vice President. 
W. D. CROPPER, Caahier. 
G S. KELLY, Asst Cashier. , 



Sale of Dresses 

* Values- to $34.95 

- $13-95 

Styles for Immediate and early Spring Wear. 

Beautiful dresses of Serge, Jersey, Satin, and Georgette combinations in the most 
fashionable colors. Far sighted women will readily realize the wonderful saving to be made 
in this sale, as dresses at so ridiculously a low price are most extraordinary. In fact most 
dresses for the coming will cost two to three times this small amount. 



Special Notice. 



We regret very much to have 
to inform you of the necessity 
of postponing our big REMOD- 
ELING SALE. Owing to the 
shortage of news print paper, we 
are unable to obtain advertising 
space sufficient to give this won- 
derful sale proper publicity. 

a 

It's coming, however, just as 
soon as our daily papers can 
give us space, watch for it. 
There'll be savings sensational 
from every department of our 
great growing store. 



Women's Muslin Gowns and 

Envelope Chemisies 

Values to $3.98. 



$1.95 



The most extraordinary special pur- 
chase of fine undermuslins we have everj 
made. Beautiful lace and ribbon trim- 
mings on the finest, sheerest quality un- 
derwear muslin. 



N otic e. 

The Public Sale of 

Jas. D. Acra 

advertise for Jan y . 28th 
will be held on 






YOUR LAST CHANCE 

To Get Government Land In 
Minnesota Under a Special 
Homestead Act at $6.25 Par 
Acre. 

Indian reservation homestead 
lands under Act of Congress pass- 
ed 1918. No improvements, res- 
idence or cultivation required. 
Long- growing season, plenty of 
rain, no crop failures, good roads, 
churches and schools. The land 
will grow any crop that other 
land will grow, and more of it. 
This price covers payment for 
the land to the Government, in- 
cludes all entry fees, two years' 
taxes and our services. Don't de- 
lay if interested. Call or address 

Minnesota Homestead Co. 

Suite 313 Tribune Annex, 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
—Adv. 

WATCH 
THE BIG 4 

Stomach-Kidneys-Heart- Uvex 

Keep the vital organs healthy by 
regularly taking the world's stand- 
ard remedy for kidney, liver, 
bladder and uric acid troubles — 

G0L9MEDAL 



Mi 



Tobacco Growers 

Before Purchasing 
Your 

TOBACCO COTTON 

Come In and See 

i 

Our Line 

The LUHN & STEVIE Co. 

(Incorporated) 

The Stare That Savas You Money. 

28-30 Pike St. Covington, Ky. 



^i 



Hi 



Beginning at 12:30 o'clock. 

Don't forget the Date, 



(ra Kyle, of CommlaMi 
UN . 
bacco <>n the Walton market (ast 



T 



borhood, told 



pounc 



ry nelgr 
ids of t( 



Monday at an average of 70 cents 

a pound One basket brought H • 

pound. It is evident that good 

or several year* atrr Parte? w«nt tobacco la •till bringing good 



-to Indianapolis Tuesday evening. 



prices. 



The John K. Coppin company of 
Covington, distributed $ 1.1,600 aa 4 
Kcmi-annu.il bonuK to its em- 
ployees on Monday Kvery paraon 
connected with the company for 
six months or more received a bo- 
nui The distribution was made by 
Manager L B Haughey. 



Th. National Ratnedy of Holland foe 
centurieeand andorsad by Queen Wilhol- 
mina.. At all druggists, tty.e alses. 

* ik. Man. CaU ll.aat.aa •»«» baa 
aad aceaat aa 



Renewing his subscription, 



Bert 



ewing mi 
Smith, of Newport, writes: "I am 
sending you |1.50 to remind you 
that I can't do without the Re- 
corder, ao please above my name 
up a notch on the list R very- 
thing going wry well hero eon- 
aJdering the everlasting tuatel 
with old H C L»' 

Leonard Hewett, who lives out 

on Woolper Heights, broke hia 

arm Tuesday whoa cranking hia 
Ford 



i 



DIRECT DEALING PAYS BEST. 

When cream is ready to sell, the hard work has been done and you should 
not permit any outsider to make an extra profit off your efforts. 
You can ship your cream DIRECT to the Tri- State and save from 3 to 
5 cts. per lb. of butter-fat. It is just as easy to deliver the Cream to a rail- 
road station as to a buying station. The Tri-Sute pays the freight and 
guarantees your cream against loss in transit. 

Mrs. Thoa. Daulton, Peebles. O., writes on Nov. 25, 1919— "I have shipped 
cream to the Tri -State Butter Co. for three years and have been satisfied. 
I have sold cream to cream stations in order to return the empty Can with 
me, as I live 9 miles from the railroad and always lost from $1.50 to $2.00 
on every can of cream sold to agents." 



67c 



We Pay the 
Freight and 

per pound for butter fat { 
week Feb. 2d to Feb. 8th, inclusive. 

The Tri-State Butter Co 

CASH CAPITAL $280,000.00. CINCINNATI, O. 

If you need cans, write for Free Trial Cans. 

1 producers find it meat profitable to skip direct. 




Take Your County Paper, $1.60. 



nppp 



THURSDAY FEB 5, 1*20. 



BirtTH RATE SLUMP. 

Decrease Is Attributed To the High 
Cost of Living. 
Philadelphia Pros*. 
The 1 very poor, and th? very 
? rich, alb.'it it is customary ti> 
icturc the wealthier classes ,as 
siackera, have children. Tho poor 
have th 3 larger fmnilios, often, 
but the deliberately childless are 
oftcner of what was until recent- 
ly the financial middls class than 
of the other clashes mentioned. It 
may be that the reported decrease 
of tho birth rate in the state of 
New York, attributed to the high 
cos-, of living, is reflective of in- 
creased unwillingness of that class 
to assume new "burden? in a period 
of difficulty and uncertainly. In- 
asmuch as merchants assert that 
the most liberal buyers nowadays 
are the wag<*-earners it is improb 
abl? that the thrift of .1 class 
charged With un thrift devotes it- 
self to limitations of offspring. 
Yet the improbable is not the im- 
possible. The rich, of Cdurtf?, are 
not striking babkvs from the list 
of luxuries 

Complaints have been made by ad 
vocates of what it 
terms voluntary m 
the class moat able to bring up 
children is that which pr a c tice s 



"WE TOLD Y0*J SO." 

If -the Democrats of the Ken- 
tucky Senate had accepted the ad- 
vice of this great family and po- 
litical journal they would he in a 
more comfortable, position than 
they are at pfCsent, their tem- 
per would be sweeter and they 
could proudly point to a record 
of abnegation and patriotism that 
is well to be able to point to 
whether deserved or not. It will 
be remembered this great journal 
advised them on the eve of the 
organization of the General As- 
sembly to play fair with the Re- 
publicans by allowing the Lieut- 
enant Governor to name tha com 
mittees (his undoubted—right), and 
nurrminjr the 



etuONB COUNTY RECORDER 

-,- ■ -..^pi i: 



Asm 



by not insisting on con., 
recess appointments "of Governor 
Stanley and Gov. Rlack. It was 
pointed out that the people had 
by *„ ^.^rtrhefming majority re- 
corded their desire that the' State 
government bo turned over to 
the Republicans, and this could 
not be done unless Gov. Morrow 
was given the appointment of 
members of the various boards 
having in charge tha execution of 
ttM | h ,' s Plans and platform pledges, 
> h«rhoo- that r * would ** a P«*ttaU blunder to 
.. £n iSSSi «' attempt to thwart him 

The Democrats of the Senate did 
see it in that tight. Undef 



limitation of birtha, and that the \KZ i-TS ^i'V/si 'X?' l "1°' 
humbler clasr-, shoutd be instruct & ^Sd S^/^^ ai Tl ln ~ 
etl in voluntary motherhooJ Th- ' ' n S . lf i 1? [« n or,, ™\ ih % deter-, 

i • i i j i . i mined to proceed in tho nt-i 

complaim Was lodged when cir- 1 c tan i „. . „ ; •„ . ,. , . 

!••• I 313111 V political W.iv which hr 

oo.i.imonfl were (.u n k,: •' '+ V. • , K ■"» DJ 

it i« . , -' as 110t no ni °"' approvert 

in higher political Circles or the 

present day v Accordingly, they 

to show going"" motoring, "golfing u^I?™ * h r Li0lK G ° v e«»or of 

and other past mes and "nees dtf£ 2£t£ffJSL2E5Fi "" CD *2 Bit " 

dren in a new lirhr. as obstacle, }£l s * nd . Proceeded to name them 



cuvnatances 

not as they now aie. (Tnless 
assumed that th" .-.uddenly rich 
wage earner has become devote i 



dren in a new light, as obstacle? 
to the care-free, going as you 
please and go when you please life 
it must be assumed that what 
was the financial middle class is, 
even more than in antebellum days 
thinking twice before increasing 
domestic burdens, and thinking 
twice alike>§houid it be discover- 
ed that the slump is due to a new 
attitude upon the part of cfoosea 
newly accustomed to the roving, 
pleasure seeking life, the Sanger- 
ites might be delighted with the 
spread of the knowledge, and the 
disposition, they have regarded 
as necessary to race betterment 
Others might repeat the appeal of 
Clemenceau to masses made friv- 
olous, and felfish, by sudden ac- 
quisition of comparative wealth. 
Is the wage-earner's wife who 



themselyeH-that Ij. a committee 
of the old regime Democrats was 
appointed to name -hem. They 
did show some flicker of political 
intelligence by giving the Repub- 
licans the majority of chairman- 
ships, important ones among the 
number, then reserved a majority 
of memberships of each commit- 
tee for themselves. They also ap- 
pointed a committee on rules, 
made up entirely of Democrats, 
which was manifestly unfair inth" 
light of the fact that the Demo- 
crats had a majority of onfy 
two in the Senate In' justification 
of this they cited the fact that 
the United States Senate, where 
the Republicans have a majority 
of only one, had set the example 
by reserving all the chairman- 
ships for themselves That was 



wears furs and dines out less h> Tn^JZJ. n>Z J? at Was 
clined toward multiple mother- i a " f *5 mp,c a11 , ri ? ht ' but l* **• 



clined toward multiple mother- 
hood than was the wage-earner's 
wife who wore gingham and de- 



apoor one, and in no sense 
justification for like action on 
the part of the Kentucky Senate 



voted herself to an exacting do- £* part or he Kentucky Senate, 
mestic routine? No * a ? always, "two wrongs So 
m not make a right.'' 

DsfsilSS Ru Pntiefmnrt ' ?° , thin £ B ' wpre in 0""* ■bape 

U9?«nss By tmiS.mdr.;. .when the Senate convened Mon 

_,.„ XT .. ,-ZT~~ L ' d: »y nf Iast w eek and SnnalorBur- 

The Nat.onal Rrasc ha- paue t l Urn. a Democratic hold-over from 
a mil increasing by one third. the the Grant-Pendleton-Bracken ds 
minimuii pay of enlisted men la . ti ict ^flew the coon '• H» vnloo 
the navy and coast guards in or-] with the Republicans against the 
der to retain their services which Democratic rales, voted w"th the 
are valuable for the training these , Republicans for the ^ confirmation 
men have had, and for the addi- of Gov. Morrow's appS ^na- 
tional even weightier, reason that i kept on voting with the nenubli- 
thv ships of our navy. Crom the cans until he went home TWsdiv 
tack of manpower, are like "paint- night The Democrats had made it 
ed ships upon- a painted ocean." hot for him/ likening him to J„ 
It is to be hoped that the bill | das Iseariot Benedict a ™,*m o^ 
will bring the necessary relief, but I a few other ehoS i" '"„ 
it is not assured. High wages ex- of whom, however? seemed to 
erase their seductive powers on < make a dent In tho «^ * , 
all public employments; and it I cranial globule henatom 

has been a hard task to obtain T i,/.« «„ 

full complements even under nor- I rer^™V«« 8ympathy I™ the 
mal conditions The patriotism of j ff-mSra' ilJl^T* l\ Ct5f>n N ° 
youth is not at fault, but he does StS^of m« » ^ nd °" C th ^ ^P"* 1 - 
not understand the requirements I c a a „°" ^J 1 ^ p °.^ > n ^e party 
of military preparation in times \ S there if H I ^^r'^" 1 ^ h,s 
of, peace. His idea is that it is centini fhp h- I tl H ,P ll ; once ac 
Ume enough to rush to the guns i h» P Lj^,lH k-?.^' ° f th ° MueM 
when the enemy is in »ight, and i 1 ^ s f a ° n u / d . h ^e been man enough 

that coincides with another vifw ! • n i by ll But hp didn't stand 
-that to maintain armi?s and na^ ^x- 1 ! ln nt, ? nn re ! 9 ? , ^ arr tri ^ f HIs 
vies when the horizon *is celar of fu p ri tlon " ludic.-ous. Sifted to 
war-clouds, savors of militarism. Crt-d fcnS ^ a rea ?° n he de ~ 
It is the military nhilo=ophv of ; to„ndS»5 « P K* i a , fls ° ciat * , » aeems 
a peaceful naUon that is ' not ^""V , .u " the dofpat of a ne ~ 
eager for war, but does not fear I ^ $° D Z?* I ,? ,ndW **» tof 
te. i P a P p °f such stuff are states- 



men made! 
But that is neither here nor 
ere. What we starfed out to 
show was that the Democrats er- 
red m not accepting the advice of 
this great newspaper If they had 



"While such sentiment.5 may be 
readily appreciated, they do not I but 
meet the requirements of nation- . ' 
a! safety Our navy is our firat 
-second and third line of defense, j 
When we have overcome th^ en- I , 

emy at sea, he cannot land on our i dOTI? wha t it advised them to do 
soil. When we have bloWn him out j lhpy w °uld have just as much pow 
■of the water we have blown him < or in th e Senate as they have 
out of existence, and thai wemav ! now - or more; they would "be en- 
be sure of such a rejult, we must ' J°.V»ng the reputation of being pa- 
be sure of men adequately train- j tnots; rather than politicians; thev 
ed to give battle under modern °°uld go before the people with 
conditions. "With raw recruits it' a J ust Plea that they put no ob- 
would be madness to expect vie- ' 9ta cle in the way of the Republi- 
tory. jeans; they could wi'h better 

Such a state of aTfairs invi e.i grace hold the Republicans re- 
serious reflection The country i sponsible for the conduct of af- 
must be protected, and if thispi-o { l "firs; and they would have saved 

f-Aniirtn /vmn*i' l,/» ,.l.l„: l i A _ > rifni* f ft r*t\ '.*■.#! Iiaa. — k i *. * 



tection cannot be obtained by en 
iistment, oth'Sf methods and "rnea i 
ures must be resorted to —Enquir- 
er. 



Health Fund for Scott County. 

Ten thousand dollars in now 
available in Scott county as a 
Health Fund. The Fiscal Court 
Saturday voted to appropriate $5,- 
BflOto supplement a timjlar amount 
donated by the Rorkefeiler Foun- 
dation for the furtherance of san- 
itation and the prevention of dis- 
ease in the county. The nppropri i 
tion was passed following an ad- 
dress by Dr. Covington, of tho 
Rockefeller Foundation and the 
reading of petitions by the Scott 
Medical Association and variouj 
civic organizations. 

A County Health Bureau will b • 
established under the joint Bupcr- 
vision of the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion and the State Hoard of Health 
Dr. Covington of the Rockefeller 
Poundation, assinted by a corps 
of nurses and sanitary engineer* 
and inspectors will Ih» in charge o( 
the work. 

Following the annoum-em-m ,,1 
the unanimous decision of the Com 
missioiHTs, addMNkst'H win made 
by Doctor V W ' ElHThiudi. Mrs. 
Town*! K Leigh.M rs, W. ILColf- 
msn, Mrs Bdns Bsldwin, and I'mf 
h ii Wantey. All the speak < -r. 
oonSuM-nded tha action of ih. 
ooaat aa4 predicted a new hesvn 
•*i a foe Soott eounty - Times 



their face and been a whole lot 
happier than they can be during 
the remainder of this session. 

" We told you so' is a poor plea. 
But didn't wc.-Cynthiana Demo- 
crat. 



GENERAL STARTLES 'EM. 

Sir David Watson Admits His Knees 
Shook At Ypres. 
II is well known that major gen- 
erals, relating their battle adven- 
tures, almost never recall their 
teeth ever shattered and their 
knees shook, but there was a di- 
vision commander who "admitted 
to the Canadian Society at the 
Biltmore last night that he could 
make neither his teeth nor his 
knees behave when the Germans 
launched the second battle at 
Ypres He is Major Gen Sir David 
WatBon, who went over with the 
fiist Canadian contingent, who 
was wounded and gassed, who or- 
ganized the forward movement 
that stopped the broken line and 
blocked the Kaiser's way to the 
channel, who was knighted for it 
und who wears, ,or could wear 
more orders and decorations than 
most generals ever heard of. 
These tactn gave some nlqosncy 

to his OOatOsalon. From the New 
York Hun 

L It McNecly is now an ei-ru- 
rsl mail carrier, having given UP 
his tl.400 s year Job 
on fcuntagton u n 
tn farming on th* C< 



The people of Potefshurc 
vicinity fie seated tael west rheal *'.i,-,i„o m <i V hu 
tha E l U lfc H f CW Co Usxtod s hsvlug u hMM 

Is* go borga of eaal 



'his fsthtii 



l» 



n>r on 

igSge 

mill 

•' uriu 

frNi- 



■f ^ 



LUCKY 




f. i. Kassebaum £ $«, 

JRiHITE t UlUli i 

MONUMENTS, * 

B Large 8t<*h on Display □ 
to 8«ltet from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme'f 

. 118 Main Street, . 

AURORA, IND. 



»•••< 




CIGARETTE 



/""^ ET a package today. No- 
" -* tice the flavor — the whole- 
some taste of Kentucky Burley 
tobacco. 

Why do so many " regular 
men" buy Lucky Strike 
cigarettes? They buy^ them 
for the special flavor *of the 
toasted Burley tobacco. 

There^ the big reason— it's 
toasted, and real Burley. Make 
Lucky Strike your cigarette. 



j Sales and Service I 

i 



: 



19 E. Seventh St., 
> COVINGTON, KY.' 



CLYDE BARLOW, 

General Manager. 




s\ Guaranteed by 




!■■••■«••**•• 



D. E, Castleman, > 
ATTORNEY AT LA W t 

— Offloe over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, , 

Erlanger. - Kentucky. 

WANTED . 

Boone County farms to sell. Ad- 
dress W. E. VE8T, » 
First Nat. Bank Building, 

Covington, Ky 



JAMES 4.. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohan Building 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



White Oak Stock Farm 




CHANDLER S (X 

Famous For Its' Marvelous Motor 




now bason hand April farrowed pigs 
both sexes; will be ready for ship- 
ment when 8 to 10 weeks old. These 
are the Big Bone and smooth type, 
the kind that makes the show hog. 
Prices Reasonable— Pedigrees Free. 
FRANK HAMMOND, 
R- D- 1, Florenoe, Ky. 

Con . Phone 229. ma 8tf 



Europe Welcomes The 
Chandler Six 

NOW and then you read someth(ng about "French style and line" In 
automobiles, or perhaps it's "the newest English idea." And some 
f oiks have gone across to get the newest suggestions. 

Europe hasn't built automobiles for five years and Europe is crying for 
new cars and good cars. 

America's style is Europe's style now. 

The Chandler Six, popular in many other countries for years but kept out 
of Europe the past three years because of war-time prohibition of shipments, 
is welcomed everywhere in Europe now— welcomed for the excellence of its 
performance, and quite as much for the beauty of Its styles df body. 

The Chandler, represented in the British Isles by Messrs. H. G. Burford 
& Company, Ltd., of London, was exhibited by that old established English 
automotive house, at the great Olympia Motor Show, /- 

and was "quite the sensation of the show" says a London cable. 
"Three hundred and seventy Chandlers were sold in two days" 

Apparently England is greatly pleased with America's best style in 
motor cars. 

The Chandler Offers Highest Quality At Tho Fairest Price 

SIX SPLENDID BODY TYPES 
Sevcn-Pastengcr Touring Car, 1189$ Four-Passengtr Roadster. S1K5 

Fotir-Fassenger Dispatch Car, 11975 
Seven-Passenger Sedan, $1893 four-Passenger Coupe, $279$ Limousine, $3398 

{Alt Prices/, o. b. Cleveland) 

S. O.SCHANKER 

Erlanger, Ky. 

i t 

CHANDLER MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

CLE'/ELAND, OHIO 



CARDU! 

The Woman's Tonic 

Mrs. Mary J. Irrin, of 
Cull en, Vs., writes: 
f'About 11 years ago, I 
suffered untold misery 
with female trouble, bear- 
ing-do wn pains, head- 
ache, numbness ... I 
would go for three weeks 
almost bent double . . . 
My husband went to Dr. 

for Gardui . . . 

After taking about two 
bottles I began going 
around and when I took 
three bottles I could do 
all my work." E-80 



All members of Burlington Bap- 
tist church, arc roquosted to be 
protest st its regular business 
wyettsf, Pubtaary itu, I'tiuu-hiim 
both oatiinlay ami Sunday )>v 
I'ustm 

R P DeMOIBKV. 

i he torn ma of vounf lambs ar- 
glu* to rvmiml th*» f«rn*rr» that 

spring u «i»i nMchuig 



W - A - N . T . E - D 

Ssatft, tyaan^ra, Mapla, 
Oak snd Walnut Lags. 

If ymt ha»» any l«» sfM writs to 
0.0. MINOIL A SAO CO 



Ml I » 



• TAIM TH* tlOM*r FA- 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All Colls Promptly Attendee. 
WALTON, KY. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by tAdver- 
tising. 






♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a 

IMPORTANT NOTICB. 
Watch tha dabs following 
yoar name on the margin 
ot your paper end If it la 
nut correct please natttfy 
this office at onoe. If your 
piper hat bem discontinu- 
ed by aiataks before your 
time expired do not delay 
notifying this office. All «r- 
tore are> oheerfniljr iiir 
ed here, 



o 
o 
♦ 
• 
e 
o 
o 
o 

e 
o 
O 
o 
o 



P WW #♦♦♦#♦ ♦♦♦00 



•uBterita tor the Rl HtURsV 



BBS 



/ 



M 



\) 



\ 



< 



THURSDAY FEB 5, 1920 



BOONK 



<~ 'T «r 



,j r/ rr^y *>5:T>?T*7Jt 



Up to tWs time the fruit pros- 
pects hereabouts are splendid. 

Ru&soll Smith bought an Ease* 
touring car of B. 5. Hume last 
week. ' 



Born on the night of the 1st 
in&t., to Blza Boston and wife, a 
daughter 

John Rylo, who lives out on the 
Florence pike was stricken with 
mumps last week. 

Buy your tobacco canvass earfy 
Mr. Farmer as it is going to be 
scarce this year. 

did 
sun 



The Ground Hog certainly 
hadow Monday as the 
shows brighf*y 



see his shadow Monday as 



Wallace- Rice arrived home the 
latter part of last week, and will 
take up farm work at once. 

J. M Eddins, Galen Kelly and 
JL. R. McNeely each sold a horse 
to a foreign buyer last week. 



James Beall, of the Francesvllle 
neighborhood, was transacting bus 
ineas in Burlington odd duy the 
past week. 

i— i 

Miss Shirley Tolln returned last 
Monday from a two weeks' visit 
with friends at Cynthiana, Harri- 
son county, v, 

Thfere will be a dance given by 
"TheiClengarry Club»'_at Odd Fel 
low 
ing 



suHall, Florence, Friday even- 
Pebruary 6th.— Adv 



• Nowton York sold his 40 aero 
farm over on Gunpowder creek 
last Saturday to a Mr. Cook, of 
Harrison county, for $1,000. 



Quit 



_ lite a good sized crowd at- 
tended E. X Stephens' sale last 
Friday. Farm implements brought 
good prices while cows .sold for 
«40 to $169; horses, $6 to $175; 
sheep, $10 a head. 



Congressman A. B. Rouse has 
been unanimously selected as Ken- 
tucky's member of the National 
Democratic Congressional Commit 
tee in the place of Hon. J. C. 
Cantrill, who resigned. 

Last Sunday night Henry Seik- 
man's Ford went over the fill at, 
the first bridge out on the Flor- 
ence pike and turned over. For- 
tunately the occupants escaped in- 
jury while the machine was dam- 
aged very little. 

Clifford Hcnslcy, of Petersburg 
neighborhood, raised 1,400 pounds 
of tobacco on one acre of land 
and sold it on the Aurora mar- 
ket one day last week at an av- 
erage of 72 cents a pound. It was 
raised on sandy land. 

P. A. Glass and M. L Baker, of 
Limaburg, were callers at this 
office one day the past week. 
These gentlemen are doing a 
vast amount of woodwork and 
blacksmithing at Limaburg and 
each is a good workman. 

Manley Oulley, who .had been 1 
connected with the medical depart 
ment of Walter Reed Hospital, 
Washington, D. C, has been dis- 
charged from the service. He was 
the last select in tlie U. S. ser- 
vice from this neighborhood. 

Rue Wingate and Edward Eas- 
ton were hauling manure last Mon 
day when their wagon slid off a 
bank, dragging the team after it. 
To get the horses relea3ed from 
the wagon' it was necescary to cut 
the harness badly. The horBeswere 
hurt but slightly. 

Attention, farmers! Ladies 

Aid Society will serve a hot lunch 
at Court House Feb. 7th for con- 
venience of those attending Farm 
Bureau Meeting. Please take din- 
ner with us, and thereby help a 
good cause. 

THE LADIES AID 



*n. 8 . 




{FEBRUARY 



10, 1920S 



B. B. Hume Was in town last 
Monday, the first time since he 
was taken Kick a few weeks ago. 
He does not know when he and 
his wife will be home as she is 
being treated for neuritis which 
has neon giving her considerable 
trouble this winter. » 

Charles Garnett, who recently 
moved from Pt. Pleasant neigh- 
borhood to Latonia, wasin town 
one day the past week. He re- 
ported that hjs wife, who has 
been an invalid for some time, 
as clightly improved. Mr. Garnett 
says he prefers the country to the^ 
city. 

Mrs. John Hogan, one of the 
teachers in the Constance school, 
was transacting business in 'Bur- 
lington last Saturday. Her school 
had been dismissed several days 
because of the appearance; of scar- 
let fever in that neighborhood. 
Her daughter, Miss Loretta, who 
is attending college in Lexington, 
came home last week to «pend a 
lew days. ^^ 

Mrs. B. C. KirUey, who died at 
a Cincinnati hospital last week 
following a surgical operation, 
was burled al Highland cemetery 
last Saturday. Mrs. Ki'-Uey was the 
only daughter and only child of 
the late Reuben and Anna Leath- 
ers Rarer, of Bast Bend. Sho is 
survived by her husband and three 
small rhlUfroii, the oldest about 
ten years of age. 

Last Frldiy night dogs killed 
and ma.igled several fine aheep 
belonging ( Itoemon, of the 

Limaburg neighborhood, and last 
Nuii'Uy night dugs raided the 
dock of bin neighbor, Hubert Hss- 
in. .n and u ouuded two. Tho ah*'i<p 
were i» s pasture close to th«* 
house and in their fright tlieygot 
hit« the yard sad ran across The 
■arch St the rssldenco, which, no 
doubt, had tom«tttiii| with 

the dugs abandoning their par- 



! PUBLIC SALE. ! 

T -i. 

Having sold my farm, I will offer at pub- 
lic auction, at 1 o'clock p. ep g&my farm 
on the Beaver Lick and Rich wood 
pike, 2 1-2 miles from Richwood, 
the following property : 

J Live Stock and Farm Implements, Etc. I 



31 ^ep, 2 Cows— both milking, 2 
Horses, 1 Pony, 2 Mules, 1 pair Mules, 
4 brood Sows to farrow in March, 
2 1-2 sets Work Harness, set Buggy 
Harness, 1919 Ford Touring Car, 2 
Tarpaulins, Tobacco Canvass for two 
beds, 3 burner Oil Stove, 50-gallon 



Gasolene Steel Barrel, 1 barrel Spray- 
ing Pulp, 1-2 bushel Clover Seed, 1-2 
bushel Alfalfa Seed, 1 new Barrel 
Churn, 1-3 interest in Grain Drill, 1-3 
interest in Scalding Box, 1 Concrete 
Roller, 4x4 and 4x6 Framing Timber, 
Log Chain and numerous other articles. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10 and under, cash; on all sums over $10 a credit of 
six month will be given, purchasers to give notes with approved se- 
curity payable at Equitable Bank and Trust Co., Walton, Ky. 

3 per cent discount for cash. 
COL W. B. JOHNSON, fv ^^ ^-% /-% ■ gFIS 

Auctioneer. Vn#. ^*- »wL.C.O. 




Falmouth Implement i Furniture Co. 

s p ka ial! 

Come to Falmouth, Ky., and Save the Difference! 

Just received a car of Brown Wagons and a car o£ Birdsell 

Wagons. This shipment was bought some time 

ago ahead of the advance in prices. 

Brown Wagon, 3 inch skein, 2 in. x 5-8 in. tire. , . . .$140.00 

Brown Wagon, 2% in. skein, 1 % in. x 5-8 in. tire $130.00 

Birdsell Wagon, three weights in 2% and 3 in. skein, 

Price $140.00, $145.00 and $15000 

Also a variety of John Deere Farm Machinery. 

Falmouth Furniture & Implement Company, 

Falmouth, Kentucky. 



^» > _ ' i « i 

a mmsjM flHIHHfaSD SEA A 

1 TRY QUALITY FIRST. { 

5 WE HANDLE THE BEST. § 

Now is a good time to select your grass See* ~m 
Place your order before prices go higher. 
NO LIMIT. 

Jack Frost Pure Cane Sugar, in packages from 2-lbs. 

to 100 pounds *r^ 18c 

Lake Herring White Fish, 8-1 b. bucket $1.25 

Lake Herring White Fish, 20-lb. bucket 2.50 

Lake Herring White Fish, 40-lb. bucket 4.75 

Lake Herring White Fish, 1 00 lbs 10.00 

WE HAVE A BIG SUPPLY OF 

TOBACCO CANVASS I 

I AT A REASONABLE PRICE. ' 

Fancy Long Horn Cheese, per pound ........... 45c 

. Fancy Full Cream Brick Cheese, per pound 40c 

O Fancy Switzer Cheese, per pound 50c Q 

Fresh Beef all the Time. I 

Fresh Bread and Rolls every morning at 9 a. m. 

PHONE US YOUR ORDERS. 

Lake Side Sifted Peas, per can 25c ^ I 

Lake Side Tiny Peas, per can 30c 

Canary Corn, per can 20c 

Canary Corn, per doaen 2.10 

Gold' Bar Peaches, per can 45c 

Gold Bar Cherries, per can 50c | 

Gold Bar Apricots (peeled ) 50c 

Gold Bar Tomatoes, per can 20c 

Gold Bar Strawberries, per can 50c 

uullev & Pettit, 

L Burlington, Kentucky. 



FUTURE OF AVIATION. 



Need of Develeping America's Air 
Forces Is Pointed Out. 

Washington Post. 
-Those deluded persona who im- 
agine that the League of Nations 
will be endowed with some magic 
art to make all wars cease will 
receive an unpleasant Jolt if they 
peruse the article entitled 'Our 
Future in the Air,'' contributed to 
a London newspaper by Gen. See- 
ly, who was until recently Under- 
secretary for Air In the British 
Government His opinion is that 
the League will not be able to 
prevent a Power from involving 
the world in well-nigh universal 
destruction, but that it will tend 
to make the attempt less probable. 
His theory is that air tieveiop- 
meht will alter completely all our 
conceptions of strategy and inter- 
national relationships, and he 
points out that Prance and Oer- 
many r realising thia- important 
fact, are retaining the designing 
staffs of the great aviation com 
panies and are spending millions 
of money in producing newer and 
better types of air machines. 

This information is supplement- 
ed by the report sent out to the 
air service by the U. S. army bv 
Colonel William C. Hensley, who 
is at present in Germany Btudying 
dirigibles. Commenting on the Bo- 
densee, the commercial air liner 
built since the armisUce, which, 
regardless of weather conditions, 
makes a regular daily flight of 
390 miles Colonel Hensley says 
that her design is so far advanced 
— . j- . ^rything he has seen that he 
is led to express the opinion that 
in "airship construction all oth- 
er countries are mere "babes in the 
wood'' compared to the Germans. 

General Seely stresses What he 
calls the "uncomfortable fact'' that 
the conversion of peace machines 
into war machines in the air is an 
affair of a few hours, or even 
even of a few minutes, affording 
a complete contrast in this re- 
spect with ships on the sea. His 
whole argument is conditioned by 
a great coming war, which he 
dearly envisages, and in which 
victory must, in hi3 judgment, in- 
evitably lie with the P 



TIME TO THINK. 

GET AHEAD OF HIGH PRICES. 
BUY YOUR SEED NOW. 

The seed market is jumping every day. You know 
that in other years prices of seed always advanced 
with the seasons. Save money by getting your seed 
earh 



TIMOTHY, RED CLOVER, SAPLING, ALSIKE, 
ALFALFA, SWEET CLOVER, ORCHARD 
GRASS, BLUE GRASS, -RED iur."*" 
Little Giant Seed Sowers. 

Hill's Seeds Do Grow. 

Expertly Tested, "Pure Clean Seed. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 



which 



Power 



_ains initial command of 
the air. The pictui-e he doaws of 
the possibility of the destruction 
within a few weeks of the en- 
emy's merchant ship 1 .:. of his 
j armed ftoct, of his railroad sta- 
! tions, of his large eitien and of 
his seat of government by a mod- 
ern air fleet is gloomy and de- 
pressing in the extreme 

The moral, of course, is that 
land must at all costs develop av- 
iation. That mora', has, however, a 
wider application. The report of 
the Colonol and the- article of the 
General bring home a great truth 
to the people of the U. S. In fact, 
they touch us on the raw. Let us 
hug no delusions, but lei: itt be 
prepared tor every eventuality 
All along the line, but especially 
In the field of aviation. the 
watchword should be, Wnke up, 
America 1 

W, A Gaines, who has been vl«« 
tUng his son, Lii'utfinut II. W. 
OaiiM's, Pari* Itland, 9, C, has 
moved on to rlori I* H<» *«/» 
Lieulmiant (iulnt t» and wilo ui o 
very eomfortly located but are 
swiully tired of srot) duties mm 
army life ll« nay* the w««ath»r 
has been gtmil UMTS bu' not »o 
good aa In Florida II- « mi» ihn 
Rentrd«M till bun «t 

in aim i fc '«« 

vipwU'U tu atar Janu ly it.U. 



t«-iM.>i..>* 




DON'T FORGET 

To order your groceries with your seed, save mon- 
ey^ three ways; Freight, Seed, Groceries. 

Navy Beans, per 100 lbs $8.50 

Lima Beans, per pound .14c 

New Catch Lake Herring, 100 lbs 8.75 

Ryde's Egg Mash of Chicken Chowder, per 

100 pounds , . 4.75 

Scratch Feed, per 100 lbs 4.00 

Leader Coffee, 3 pounds for 1.00 

New Orleans Molasses, 5-galIon can 7 SO 

Holland Herring, 6-Ib. Keg 1.35 



Northern Kentucky's! ^ G E §I«^ 



QEs£C 



23P/H5 ^ 



United States Wheat Directors)License No. 010835-Y 

III 



A Heartto-Heart-Talk 

a 
How many times have you read an advertise- 
ment, "Walked right in and turned around 
and walked right out again?" We have 
no fear of you doing this here, 

BECAUSE: ~ 

FIRST— We are judges of cloth and have the 
most dependable Ipes of CLOTHING made. 

SECOND — We know we give you Worman- 
ship and a Perfect Fit. 

Wachs' Clothing means complete satisfaction, 
and you cannot obtain better anywhere at 
any price. Let us show you our line of Mens', 
Young Mens' and Boys' 

Suits and Overcoats. 



L 
I 



Selmar Wachs,. 

605 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 



Ill 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Maimer and Funeral Director 



i 
I 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 
Consolidated Phone 35. Farmers Phone. 



Philip Taliaferro 

^a^aaaaaa —— ' 

Undertaker 1 Embalmer 



Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 

ERLANQER, 



KY. 



( Day: Erf. 87. 
) NighL Erl. 52-Y 



•«• tfMit 



fttftd Our A4vt ^cmcafo and Profit Bv 




mm 



mm 



i^^p 



T 



THURSDAY FEB 3, 1920 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



h 



gpnuF CO. RECORDER 

VUBLISIIKI» EVBRY T1HU<I>AV 

W. L. KIDDBLL, Publisher. 

"V i ••!.<! n« 1 1 • Pi 1 1» ffJce in hurling 

I, K J .. H^ Si CMllll-chtSS Mail 

SOLD $10,009 WORTH 
OF CREAM TO THE 
TRI-STATE BUTTER CO 

Harrison, Ohio, Man Says He Never 
Received a Cream check But That 
He Felt He Had Been Given Right 
Weight and Test. 

"After 7 years' dealings we teel 
it your due to have a word 'of*, 
appreciation (or your square dv>a>- j 
ings in that U.... ..rttefr-Chas. I 

Bonham, a well known and re-* 
epected farmer of Harrison, Ohio, j 

Mr. Bonham i» we41 known in j 
his community and takes an :ic- ; 
tive part in all activities for tns | 
betterment of (he agriculiural in- 
terests, lie has a herd of 21 Jer- 
seys and he considers them West 
for cream production. 

,: We aold a few cans of cream 
to the local stations Co try Hu?m ! 
out," continued Mr. Bonham, "but ] 
always wont back to Th" Tri- 
StateV Mr. Bonham received owr 
$10,000.Cu in Xr-i #••*• checks dur- 
ing the past 7 years and butter- 
fat was considerable cheaper " 
years ago than it is today. Every 
new cream buyer that opened up 
shop, tried to buy Bonrjam's 
cream— he was coaxed to give 
them each a trial, but even tlm 
the station buyers did their best, 
it was useless for Mr. Bonham to 
sell his cream to a commission 
buyer, for when one handles a 
herd of 21 cows, the hard work is 
done before the cream is brought 
to town and when the cream is 
in town, Mr. Bonham couldn't see 
any use in taking •from 3 cents 
to 5 cents per pound leas for his 
cream in order to 'favor a cream 
buyer, especially when he knew 
his check would come along from 
The Tri State, in a few days af- 
ter shipping, bringing the FULL 
price for the cream. 

The Tri State Butter Company 
only buys from the producer and 
every shipment is received in the 
patron's own cair and over 35,000 
of the largest cream producers 
find it a big advantage to ship 
DIRECT, as it gives the cream- 
ery so much better quality of 
cream and consequently a better 
price to the producer compared 
to the mixing of all £indg togeth- 
er 

We will gladly send Free Trial 
Cans for 30 days to any one need- 
ing cans to give us a trial. If 
you have cans, write for shipping 
tags. The Tri State Butter Com- 
pany, Cash Capital, $250,000.00; 950 
fcenyon Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio — 
Adv. _____ 

COUNTY COURT DOINGS. 



Master Commissioner Maurer 
sold realestate as follows last 
Monday ; 

In the case of W. E. Walton, &c, 
against Elinor Walton, 30£ acres 
on Toad between Limaburg and 
Constance to N. G. Harrison for 
13,000. 

In the case of T. W. Cook, Ex- 
ecutor, of Ben Cook against Leila 
Cook, &c, 29.97 acres near Water- 
loo to John PortWood ."or $1,400. 
The widow, Lelia Cook, bought 
the dower right for $100. 

In the case of Margaret Eshman 
on petition 165. acres of the old 
R. FT. Botts farm in Bellevipw 
bottoms, sold to John Rogera, for 
$1,900. . 

In the case of Eliza Close again3t 
Agnes Spacy, 15 acres Middle 
creek bottom In neighborhood of 
Belleview sold for $3,275 to Wm. 
Rogers and 9.94 acres adjoining 
the town of Belleview was sola 
to Isaac Flick for $2,650. 

In the case of Hattie Tilly Burn?* 
against Susie Tilly the house and] 
lot in Petersburg was sold to E. i 
C. Riley for $215. 



"COOL 



He says lh:.i a 
skate" - -ckcc-fdd 

A REAL pnl— that's 
Chesterfield. 
Look at its record. 
Three million smokers 
—less than five years on 
the market! Two words 
explain it— 

"They Satisfy!" 



hesterfield 



CIGARETTES 



rftjfri 



PUBLIC 





♦ ♦♦♦*♦♦♦ «♦♦<>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<>♦♦ 

♦ • 

• FL1CKERTOWN. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦♦*♦!>*•♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 



♦♦♦♦<>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
• ♦ 

♦ DEVON. ♦ 

• ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦I 

Ira and Joe Schadler who have 
James Gaines does not improu , nuaslos are getting along nicely. 

mucn , „ , , • ,t ! Mrs. Perry Dixon and daughter, 

Noah Sebree has pneumonia at j m ^ M ^ isitcd j B Dixon an d 

his father's. ; „:- rf , r ,, rr >Aontlv 

Mrs. Ira Ryle and daughter, were j ««« * r Hut9Pl f Dr . Sympson and 
sick last week . James, were in the city Wed- 

Mrs. Arthur Alloway has erysip- , nesda J on ' bu8ine8S . 
clas in her face ■ ■ Mr8 T j Hutsell had for her 

Bert Smith and sons visited his ts Sunday. Mrs. Annie KeD- 

parents here Sunday WIi . t Jfiedv and son, Roy and Mrs. John 

Hazel Brady visited Alice W hite | Roache 
Saturday and Sunday ; . There w m be a dance given by 

Wm. Finn visited home lolks ; „ The Glengarry C i ub> . at <5dd Fel- 

»re from Friday untU Monday. . „ „ plnppn „ p P iHav pven- 



here from Friday 

B. F Akin and family visitqd 
Sebree Bros., and family, Sunday. 

Robt. Snow and Philip Klopp ' 
each entertained with a dance last 
week. 

Finn Bros, had to kill oTie of 
their horses last week on account 
of getting crippled on the ice, 

J. W. White and family, Miss 
Pearl Botts and Hazel Brady din- 
ed with F. M. Voshell andfamify 
Sunday. 

There will be a dance given by 
"The Glengarry Club>' at Odd Fel- 
lows Hall, Florence, Friday even- 
ing February 6th.— Adv. 

Richard Hensley lost on th:? 
road between Petersburg and 
home a new John Holland foun- 
tain pen Finder will please notify 
him. 



GUNPOWDER. 



P. J. Allen and wife broke bread 
with this writer last Sunday. 

Ernest Horton and family were 

uests at B._ A. Rouse's last Sun- 
ay. 

Moses Rouse and family, of Lim- 
aburg, visited his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs.' J. W. Rouse last Sunday. 

Robert Tanner, who we report- 
ed sick in our last has improved 
somewhat, but is still confined to 
his room. 

Lonnie Tanner has a lot of 
hand made brooms for sale at a 
reasonable price. See him near 
Florence. 

Sidney Rouse had a telephone 
installed in his home last week 
and is now in touch with the 
outside world. 

J. H'. Tanner of Florence, came 
out to his farm one day last weett 
and replenished hia coal bin with 
a load of wood when he returned 
home. 

The tobacco crop in this neck 
of the woods has about all been 
sold and the growers have the 
balance in their ledger very great- 
ly in their favor. 



lows Hall, Florence, Friday even^ 
ing February 6th.— Adv. 

Mr. Elliott is. moving to the 
farm recently purchased of Mr. 
Charles Tyree. We extend a wel- 
come to our new neighbors. 

We learn with much regret of 
the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Utz, 
of Erlanger, and extend our sym- 
pathy to the* bereaved family 

Mr. Ray mo id Royers, of Day- 
ton, Ohio,' wa3 the gue&t of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank McCoy Tuesday. 
R? will move to the farm he re- 
cently purchased of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank McCoy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Dixon, of 
Richwood, Mr. and Mrs Harvey 
Utz and little daughter, Elizabeth, 
and Mrs. B. C. Surface, Sundayed 
with Mr. and Mrs. Hogrefe, near 
Independence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCoy mov- 
ed to their farm, recently pur- 
chased of Mr. Schafer, last Fri- 
day. This neighborhood has lost 
two kind neighbors and friends in 
Mr. and Mrs. McCoy's leaving. 

Mrs. Lucy Carpenter, widow of 
the late Eli Carpenter, died at 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Harmon Hearne, last Friday about 
noon. She and her husband were 
two of the substantial people t»f 
this county. 

Mr. Charles Tyree and family 
sold their farm here to Mr. El- 
liott, of Kenton county, and are 
moving to Irving, where they 
formerly lived. They have made 
many friends here who regret to 
have them leave. 



I will offer for sale at my residence on the 
Dixie Highway, near Florence, beginning 

at 12 o'clock, 

Mraarj M 1920 

The Following Property: , 

6 year old driving or work Mare, 7 year old Cow with calf by her side, 2-horse Platform 
Spring Wagon, rubber tire Buggy good as new, 2-horse Sled, 1-horse Sled, hinge Har- 
row, Oliver Chill No. 20 turning Plow, 5-tooth Cultivator, single shovel Plow, log Drag, 
Mowing Scythe, Trippletree, Doubletrees, Singletrees, Monarch Jack, 54 feet 1 inch Rope, 
some 1-4 inch Rope, 40 Bushel Boxes, some woven wire, Tobacco Sticks and some can- 
vass, new Riding Saddle and Bridle, new Double Set Work Harness, Collars and Bridles 
new set Buggy Harness, two Leather Halters, 2 Axes, Scoop Shovel, Hoes, Forks and 
Rakes, Cross Cut Saw, Hand Saw, Picks and Shovel, 2 dozen Plymouth Rock Chickens, 
some Seed Potatoes, Milk Cans, Double Barrel Shot Gun. Household Furniture consist- 
ing of Cooking Stove, Heating Stove, 1 Mahogany Parlor Suite and some Beds, Chairs, 
Carpets and other things too numerous to mention. ■ 

TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash ; over that amount a credit of six 
months given, without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved 
security, payable in Florence Deposit Bank, Florence, Ky. 

H. C. Norman. 

LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer. 



PUBLIC SALE. 



I will sell at public auction at my place in 
Union, Boone County, Kentucky, on 



OTNDH. 





RICHWOOD 



FISCAL COURT. 

The Fiscal Court was in liwln n 
Tuesday and dispoaed of consider- 
able business, the following being 
about all of general importance: 

Ernest M. Arnold was appointed 
county road engineer until the 
first of nex>; January at a salary 
<of $1,800 and expenses not to ex- 
ceed $50 a month. 

County road bonds were sold as 
follows: 

Each bond was for $500 and W. 
A. Price got 6 ; R. O. Ryle, 1 ; E. 
H. BUtfkcnbeker, 2; J L. Stephens, 
4; Wm'. S Stephens, 2; R. H. Tan- 
ner, 1 ; Boone Co. Deposit Bank, 
7; Peoples Deposit Bank 7. 

John Sidney Gaines Dead 

John Sidney Gains'*, 67, died 
his home in Denver, Colo., Jan. 27, 
after an illness of three days of 
Jaundice followed by dropsy. Hi- 
is survived 'by his wife, one son, 
«ue daughter and one brother, 
James T. Gaines, of the Idlewlhi 
neighborhood. 'Hia wlfo was Miss 
Fannie Stephen*, daughter of the 
late John Stephens, of Bullitts- 
viUe neighborhood. The remains 
were buried at Denver. 



Offtrtd a Good Profit. 

The laat report is Jaa. D. ACjra 
h«a been offered nun- thousand 
dollars for the property lit' pur- 
chased a few weeks ago of (' (' 
Roberts for $6,500. "There is no 
question about BurtLngtun prop- 
erty being in demand but no one 
anticipated fabulous priced be- 
offered or paid for U 



ea*#oae*eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

♦ ♦ 

♦ IDLEWILD. • 

♦ ♦ 

♦♦♦♦•♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 

A. H. Norman was a business vis- 
itor in Burlington Saturday. 

Ben Hewett ofCleves,was in the 
neighborhood Thursday trying to 
buy mules. 

Mrs. Henry Selkman spent Sat- 
urday with her daughter, Mrs. L 
C. Scothorn. 

Mrs. William Terrill Berkshire 13 
convalescent from a brief but se- 
vere illness. 

L. C. Scothorn took a truck load 
of tobacco to Falmouth Monday 
for Snyder Bros. 

The "Western Reserve'' haa 
again changed hands— Mr. Holi- 
day being the last purchaser. 
Miss Johnny May Terrill is home 
at 'from a "*■** in Walton with her 
sister, MrB. Scott Chambers. 

The farmers whose coal bins 
were empty are busy hauling from 
the barge received at Petersburg 
Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Jarrell will 
move in a few days to their new 
home near Bullittsville" on the 
North llend road. 

The dance at Petersburg Friday 
night was a very enjoyable af- 
fair and immensely enjoyed by 
the local young people. 

Jack Eddins came over from 
Burlington Saturday and bought a 
big team of work horses from W. 
T Berkshire It pays to advertise. 
After Monday, "Ground Hog 
Day," we will know what to CK- 
iM el in the way of weather. So 
far any old kind has btwN doled 
out to us 



J. B. Conner is quite ill. 

Will Williams has returned from 
Florida. 

J. J. Cleck is still crippled by 
rheumatism. 

Mail has been very irregular for 
the past two weeks. 

O. O. Dixon is stilt nursing Mr. 
Perry Corbin at Union. 

Frank Youell has about recov- 
ered from the measles. 

Robert Martson lost two horses 
during the sleety weather. 

William Cody, of South Dakota, 
was visiting frienda here the past 
w r eek. 

P. P. Hunter and wife have re- 
turned from several days' trip to 
Van Wert, Ohio. 

Courtney Pope has bought prop- 
erty in Tjnioii and a one half in- 
terest in Mrs. A. F. Smith's store. 
There will be a dance given by 
"The Glengarry Club'' at Odd Fel- 
lows Hall, Florence, Friday even- 
ing February 6th.— Adv. 

Mrs. Lucy Carpenter, wife of the 
late EU .Carpenter, died at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Har- 
mon Hearne, Saturday, after be- 
ing sick for several weeks. Mrs. 
Carpenter was r8 years and ten 
months old and had been an in- 
valid for eight years. Funeral was 
held ,Monday, services at the home 
and interment at the Eli Carpen- 
ter cemetery. Mrs. Carpenter was 
loved by all and was a believor 
in her God and was always mo3t 
cheerful and patient 



I I'rank Houston, of Frankfort, 
Sheriff Conner did not have In H ( > Houston, of Dry Ridge, and 
a sale last Monday on Be- j t . Houston of Walton, Mr. and 
of iriiny— "* taxoa every I Mrs J T. Htepli»ii»t>ii and daugh- 
i advertfced having In-en ,,., . rti Helen and Marie, of Lima* 
- Vhi« MMTJM **> deiiOiiUeu I bury. \ . j* guest-, ..ttndsv of tuftr 
payer* is causing ""•"'; kinsman, Itru S Houston and Mr* 
mmd Uke out lKra*e<| „ lHlMll|l 




deals were pulled off 



hi 



f;o land buyers were 
■at Tuewtay hut no 



NOTICE OF SALE. 

Notion is hereby given that The 
Board of Education of Booii'h Coun- 
ty offers for nalo the real property 
known as the Craven School prop- 
erty, Div. I. Sub-district No. 4a, sit- 
uated about three (8) miles west of 
Verona, Boone County, Kentucky. 

Also the real property known as 
the Mud Lick School property, Div. 
I, Suh-dihtriet No. 26. situated on 
Mud Lick Creek, ubeut six (fl) miles 
west of Verona, on Mud Lick Creok. 

Terms of Hale:— Cash bids are to 
be went, under seal, to J. I'. Gordon. 
Hunt. Hchools, Hooue County. The 
bids made separately on each piece 
of property. B*£b bid Is to be ac- 
companied with a check of fifty (160) 
dollars to mIiow no..«l faith. The bids 
10 be opth.d Ket. 14, HMD. at 10 a. m. 
The highs*' hlddei (o become pur- 
chaser Tr?0 Hoard ttt He w allas* ' 
serves the right to reject any and s>U 

bids 

|l) order of the Board of Kduea- 

tlon 

J.C UOHlH>N, 8upt 
r. I'LOHst, b«elj. 



The Following Peronalty: 
1 good general purpose Horse, 1 Road Wagon 
larltK box bed, 1 Hay Bed, 1 McCormick Mowing 
Machine in good shape, 1 Hayrake, 1 Single 
Harpoon Hayfork and 110 feet rope and pulleys, 
1 Sickle Hayknife, No. E Oliver breaking Plow, 
Hinge Harrow, Single Shovel Plow, Double 
Shovel Plow, Kraus Riding Cultivator, Single 
row Corn Drill with Fertilizer attachment, one 
wheel Dirt Scraper, set of Work Harness, lot of 
Hay— 4 or 5 tons in barn, about 200 bushels 
of Corn— some white and some yellow, about 
2,000 tobacco sticks, 5-to^th Cultivator, set of 
Doublet rees and Singletrees, 2-horse Sled- 

TERMS OF SALE. " 

o4U sums of $5.00 or under, cash ; on sums over $5.00 a credit of 6 months 
without interest will be given. No property to be removed till terms of 
sale are complied with. Notes must be negotiable and payable at Union 
Deposit Bank. Sale to begin at 1 o'clock promptly. ^ mmmmmm 

L. H. VOSHELL. 

Sale to begin at 1 o'clock p. m. 



GEO. BURKITT, Audtioneer. 



Public Sale. 




30 acres on Union and Hathaway 
pike, has house of 8 rooms and all 



I n«eassarv oat buildings, all except 
l will sell at my residence 2 miles \ »•££?* ™\ n „„.. _ . 

from BurlluKton on the Burling- mu j. STANLEY UTZ, 

o f If Burlington. Ky., R D 2. 



tou and Union roed, begln- 
ntg at 12:80 o'clock sharp 
Saturday, February 7th, 1920 
the following property: 
ll Cuws, 
I Heifers, 
I yMarliug Bull, 
I staok of May, 

eongued and gtmjvm! HM 
Lumber, aud many «'tbei article*. 
Tef m* made known on day oi tats 
IWmieiiiber the dar »ud hour. 

JAMM sUBBMOti. 



MOST DESIRABLE FARM- 



180 aoree, 80 acres level bottom land, 
7 room house, good barn and otbar 
improvMieeiits, hear school, churches 
and railroad. Good l^b** 00 '«& 
I»rloe sHO.UW 

of» « H. KIHHER, 

Uawjeeaeburg 



I ml. 



narswtmrRHK 



CHESTER L. TANNER 

Brooder end Hhlpper of 

Chester Whites, 

R. D. 1 Florence, Ky. 

Young,stook for sale, sired by 
Settles' Choice, a Kentucky 
State Fair prla* winner, and out 
of mature sows of the best 
bloodlines. Also 2 Red Sows. 
Cease sad see tkesn. 



FOR 8ALS. 

Ford Touring Oar Itflt model In 
condition. For particulars sea Anna 
L Ay lor or Llnole Pushy , Florenee. 
Ky, (sbl-tt 



i 



fi 



^^^^*^*^^*mm 



^mm 



mmm 



BOOWl COUNTY RE/CORD KB 



THrRSDAY FEB 5, 1120. 



• f 



Trade Where they AH Trade" 



*» 



Goode & Dunkie 

are doing more business than any other house in Northern Kcncucky. 
WHY? Ask any of our customers about our Prices, Treatment, 
and Quality of goods. 

Mr. Farmer— 

Almost tvwj *lay~W3"gct favoi»'w»c*^ports on stcJ* wc have 
sold. We do not handle low grade, trashy seeds. We know seeds 
and we know where to buy and we give you the benefit of our 
knoweledge and experience, When you order from us you can de- 
pend on High Test, Purity and Germination. 

Send us your inquiries for prices and samples of CLOVER, AL- 
FALFA, ALSIKE, TIMOTHY, BLUE GRASS, ORCHARD 



GRASS, Etc. 



WE BUY RIGHT AND WE SELL RIGHT. 



Send us your orders for Granula- 
ted Sugar. We will try to fill 
them. 



Blatchford's Calf Meal, cwt. $5.90 
Conceded to be the best on the 
market 



V)£)dfr€mdMunKi& 



CRO CERfES. FL OUR SEED 5 . MEDIC/NES 
19-21 PIKE ST. A3 2 0W. 7™ ST. 



WHOLESALE-'Coving ton's Largest Seed and Grocery Honse"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

, Phones South 335 and 336. 
United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



Public Sale 



PETERSRl?KO, 



tt 



Farmers in this prccifjcJ are re--, 
riueslod to b<> sore an i atieadfhel 
Farmers' Bureau meeting to be- 
held here at 7:30 p. m. Thursday.' 
February 5th. 



Nothing wrong with our balance! 

—Chesterfield 



9* 



FKANCBSVILLK 






Having sold my farm I will offer for sale to the 
highest bidder at my residence on the Lima- 
burg and Anderson's Ferry Pike, near Pt. 
Pleasant Church, Boone County, Ky., on 




February 12th, 1920 



»»•♦♦♦♦♦♦ •♦♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Frank Aylor and "wife were Sun* 
day guests at Harry Kilgore's. 

Fred Reitroann moved to Harry 
Kilgore's house here one day last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Reitmann 
were Sunday guests at Fred Reit- 
mann's. 

Edward Eggleston spent Satur- 
day night and Sunday with his 
friend, Henry Collier. 

Edward Eggleston spent one 
night last week with R. B. Wilson 
and family near Hebron. 

J. Y. Bailey and Harry Muntz 
each shipped a toad of hogs to 
Cincinnati market last week. 

Charles Beall, Jr., spent the I 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs J. \\ ! 
Utzinger, near Lawrencetmrg. 

School was closed here Laat | 
week on account of the illness of j 
the teacher, Miss Sadie Kieman. 

Chaa. Ooodridge, of Burlington, 
was the guest of hid father, Wm 
Goodridgv', one night las; week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huey en- 
tertained several of their rela- 
tives from near Burlington Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Whitaker, Jr. 
of near Hebron, called on W. L. 
Brown and wife Sunday after- 
noon. 

Misses Florence and Elnora Eg- 
gleston were guests of Misses Jes- 
sie and Gladys Wilson near He- 
bron, Saturday night. 

There will be a dance given by 
"The Glengarry Club'' at Odd Fel- 
lows Hall, Florence, Friday even- 
ing February 6th.— Adv. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Ayfor and 
sons and Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Rid- 
dell spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. J*. A. Riddell near Hebron. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Scothornhad 
as guests Sunday Mr. and Mrs. L. 
C. Scothorn and children, of Idle- 
wild, and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Baker and little son. 

Word was received hefe last 
week that Mrs. Sam Collier, who 
has been visiting relatives at Ash 
land, this State, is very ill in a 
hospital at that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Eggleston had 
as guests Sunday, Rev. B. F. Swin- 
dler, of Petersburg, Frank Estes, 
Justin and Julius Aylor, William 
Caaeldine, Misses Gladys, Myrtle 
and Jessie Wilson and brother. 
Alfred. 

Mike Stahl died of pneumonia 
last Thursday morning. The fun- 
eral services were conducted by 
Rev. Royer at Hebron church fast 
Saturday afternoon, after which 
the remains were laid to rest in 
the Hebron cemetery. Mr. Stahf 
leaves* a wife and two children 
to mourn his death. We extend our 
sympathy to the family in their 
sad bereavement. 



THE right balance 
of costly Turkish 
and choice Domestic 
tobaccos, propor- 
tioned by experts— 
that's why Chester' 
fields "satisfy r 




The Income Tax. 

Every unmarried person having a gross income of 
$1,000, and every married person having a gross in- 
come of $2,000 or more must file a retjrn with the 
Collector of Internal Revenue before March 15- 

If we can be of service to you in this matter it 
will be our pleasure to do so. 

We feel that there is more in banking than the mere 
lending of money, cashing checks, accepting deposits, 
etc.; it is that broad word SERVICE to which you 
are entitled at our hinds. USE US. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky, 

Capital $50,000.00 

Surplus and Profits $100,000.00 

W. L B. ROUSE, Presides.. A. B. RENAKER, Cadiier. 

EDGAR C glLEY, Vice-Pre*. 
NELL H. MARTIN, A..t. Cashier. L. T. UTZ, Ami. Cashier. 



I 



\ 

The Following Property : 

2 good work Horses, 5 extra young Jersey Cows— one fresh, 
1 to be fresh at time of sale and 2 in June, 1 2-horse Spring 
Wagon, 1 -horse Spring Wagon, half interest in new Mow- 
ing Machine, Breaking Plow, 1-h. Treadpower; 1-h. Power 
Feed Cutter, Hinge Harrow, lot of Hay in barn, lot Fodder, 
2-horse Sled, set double Wagon Harness, set single Harness, 

3 dozen Barred Rock Chickens, and some Household and 
Kitchen Furniture and many other articles. 

TERMS OF SALE. 

On all sums of $10.00 and under, cash ; over that amount a 
credit of six months without interest will be given, purchaser 
to give note negotiable and payable in Peoples Deposit Bank, 
Burlington, Ky., before removing property. 

J. Wood Riggs. 



• ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ Ruby Corbin and mother, Set or 
a • glasses, Mrs. Spradiing and fam- 

• PLORENCB. a fly, pair towels, Charles Craven, 

• * and family, aluminum kettle, Flor- 
e*aaenaeaee>ee#neeeeeaees>ae i ence Walker, bath towels, C. W. 

Tobe Marshall and wife were Myers and wife, fancy vases, Rus- 
eallers here Thursday. J™ House, pair towels, G. W. 

There seems to be an epidemic Ellison and wire, bath towels, 
of colds here and several are quite William Aydelotte and wife, sugar 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»•♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦« 

a a 

a CON8TANCB a 

a a 

♦♦•♦**-»-» *+♦♦♦« *♦*♦+♦«■«•♦** 

Montgomery Anderson is sick. 

School is closed on account Of 
scarlet fever. 

Mrs* Clyde Ellis, who was sick, 
is improving. 

Mrs. Bruce Anderson fell on the 
ice and broke her arm. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Miller have 
named their three week'B old baby 
Evyln Lucille. 

Oliver Kottrayer is out again af- 
ter having been confined to the 
house with, a cold.. 

Harrison Wilson, the genial 
bachelor, of Constance, enter- 
tained his friends Saturday even- 
ing, Jan. 31st, with a smoker and 
card party. An elegant lunch was 
served at the appointed hour An 
enjoyable evening was spent by 
all present and the guests left 
with the beat wished for their 
host. Mr. Wilson was assisted in 
entertaining by his friend Mr. 
Julius Beil. 



sick. 

Mrs. J. R. Whitson is visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Myers in Hamil- 
ton, Ohio. 

Miss Gertrude Meiman, of Kr- 
langer, was calling on friends 
here Sunday. 

Mrs Kendred entertained Sat- 
urday Rev. and Mrs. Criswell and 
Rev. Hobbs. 

Miss Myrtle Ryle, of Norwood, 
was the guest o f her sister Sheral 
Ryle Sunday. 

Henry Myers, of Flint, Michigan, 
called on his brother, C. W. Myers, 
one day last week. 

Mrs. P. L. Sayre received a box 
of candied fruits from La Valle, 
France, for her birthday. 

Mr and Mrs. James K. Tanner i °°wl . '*«« cream pitcher, 
are the proud parents of a ten , Lonnie Tanner, kettle, Arch Lu- 
pound. boy-James Frances. ! cas and family, dozen glasses, At- 

For /Sale- A White Collio dog. [ bert Norman and wife, silver tea 
Would be fine driver for stock, spoons. Annie Aylor, fancy plates, 
One" year old. Will sell cheap Bex- ' Jane Scott, flour, sifter, Charlie 
nard Boyer j Carpenter and wife dresser «caxf. 

There will be a dance given by j 5° Bk J,. Aylor, clothes pins, Mr. 
"The Glengarry Club-' at Odd Fel- Spradiing, tea pot, Charles Cor- 
lows Hall. Florence, Friday even- bin *^°Li^J£ e , r J ' bath .* et » Mar * 
ing February "th— Adv. I *_ n st** to *r^ ?**• P^«» 



bowl and cream pitcher, Joe Man- 
nan, wash board, Nellie Scott, 
cracker jar and clothes pins, Oor- 
don Laile and wife, cream pitcher 
and sugar, bowl,, Beryl Boyer, 
pie plates, Albert Boyer, spoon 
holder, Raymond Newman and sis 
ter. pair towels, Clarence Nor- 
man and wife, pair towels, Ed. 
Newman and wife, pair towels, 
Bruce Wallace and H«nk> Norman^ 
serving tray, Willie Boyer.% dish, 
Ed. Osborn and wife, cream pit- 
cher and sugar bowl, Mrs. John 
Whitson, jpmon dish, Frank 
Souther and wife, cake plate, Al- 
bert Souther, towels, John Mei- 
man, box soap, Mrs. Joseph Scott, 
bath towels, Emma Scott, 



sugar 
, lira. 



Mo^^rovefy^ncror 
cream and cake was served. 



J. M. EDDINS, Auctioneer. 



Sale to begin at 12:30 o'clock. 



I 



♦ 



HUBERT.RYLE & SON 

Brawler* and Shipper* of 

Purebred Hampshire Swine 

All Stock RsgUterad. 
Correspondence and Inspectlea lavlUd. 

We carry the bloodlines of Lookouts General Tipton, Sllko, 
and the Dew Drop strain. Best Ilium of breeding to be found, 
thoy have else and quality and early maturing. The best bag 
for the breeder and the best to build up his bauk account. 
Why raise eorube that consume more feed and sell for less 
muiisy f Haiupahiree fad at the Ky. Agricultural College 
dressed (#o per oeut. ; Less than 10 per cent lues. 

QRANT, - KY. 



♦eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

a a 

♦ WOOLPBR HEIGHTS. a 

eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee* 

About all the tobacco in this 
neighborhood has been delivered. 

James Beemon visited hit par- 
ents, Owen Beemon and wife, Tuea 
day of last week. 

Mr. and lira Newton Sullivan, 
Sr , spent Sunday with Bd. Beaton 
and wife of Woolpar. 

Mrs B K. Aylor of Woolper, 
sepnt Saturday night with her 
mother and sister near Hebron. 

Mr. and Mrs Henry Wtngsteand 
sons spent Sunday with his broth- 
er, Mr llogan Wlngato and wife, 
Of lYtorshurg 



Dr. Yelton sold to W L Kirk- 

rtriak last Monday tan nana at 
aaaU s pound that brought 



(NO 



a a 

a RABBIT HASH a 

a a 

aeseeeeeseeeaaeeeeeeeeeeee 

Raymond Acra has a new auto- 
mobile. 

Mra. B. R. Scott is very sick at 
her home near Waterloo. 

Dr. Kenneth Ryle, of Burlington, 
was in Rabbit Hash Sunday after- 
noon. 

Ed. Rice, and Jeff and Jack Ed- 
dins, of Burlington, were here 
Sunday. 

Miss Laura Wilson, of Jonesburg, 
Mo., spent Saturday night and 
Sunday at Esq. Chas. Wilson's. 

A large number of people in 
this neighborhood attended the 
funeral of Mrs. B. C. Kirtley at 
Highland cemetery Saturday. 

Geo. W. Ward transferred his 
farm of 130 acres, known as the 
Ganet VanNess farm, to E. S. 
Pope, last Thursday. 

The heirs of Mra Sallie Steph- 
ens will have a public sale other 
personal property next Saturday. 
At the same time the house and 
lot will be offered for \salo. 

R M Wilson and L. t'. Heemon 
received three tons of teed from 
Cincinnati by truck, Friday, and 
sold one half of it by Saturday 
night There is a big demand for 
ail kinds of read here 

f'ARI) OP THANKS We wish to 
thank oor neighbors ufltd friends 
for the aaajatancv, ran* and *ym- 

Cthy shown our mother, Mra Hal- 
Staphena, in haw last aicknasa 
and death, to all thst aeaUted 
or offered ssaUtsa.* wa sea vary 
grateful and we saeure them their 
■ I tineas w» appelated 

The children. 



will Tte^Xeedt?hea7 at T& ***** •lowly lunch of ice 

^™^ f d 7, I^IJunftS?^ °wir.,on1 
Cam Kennedy, wife and son, Wal t and happy life 
t, and Mrs. Eliza Whorton, were I mm 



ter 

Sunday guests of Mrj. Kennedy's 

sister, Mrs. M. E. Love and attend ' 

a 



ed the 17th anniversary of Rev. 
H. C. Runyan, of Latonia. 

Misses Addio and Tina Norman 
entertained last Thursday evening 



HEBRON. 



eaeeeeeeeeeeaseeeeeeeeeeen 



<>iueriamea Last xnursoay evening j s l^ e continues about the 
m honor of their brother, Clifford aame 
Norman and wife, with a showfe j Hubert Conner has been sick 
the many friends and relatives that I r or several davs ^^ 

Lester Aylor and wife entertain- 
ed relatives Sunday. 

Large crowds have been attend- 
ing the Hebron Theatre. 

A. D. Hunter, who recently sold! 
his farm to Mr. Hollis moved to 
the Davis farm last week. 

Mra Walter Rafer is teaching 
in the Intermediate room while 
Miss Maud Tanner la sick. 
Elmer Goodrldge and family and 



came to enjoy the occasion were 
as follows: Dr. T. B. Castleman 
and wife, picture, Mr. and Mra 
Dave Brown, fruit dish and cream 
pitcher, Mr. J. O. Roberts, set of 
spoons, Paul Avdlotte pitcher and 
flasaes, Geo. Miller and family, 
celery set, Nannie Corbin, guest 
towels, Mr. and Mra. Lee Whitson, 
pillow cases, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Conner, dresser scarf, Corey Laile, 
fruit dish, Winfield Myers, syrup 



Xl™a, Z'T.T?' ? yrUp Luther Rou "> ■»* family spent 
SSSf nJ! t^.S* M y k° ag ' Sund *y at Hen ry Getkers • 
fl 1 ™ VUM*..** Mrs Harry Mrs Chester iftx waj called to 



Brown, two pictures and silver 

Eickle fork, Minnie Baxter, sugar 
owl and cream pitcher, Mrs. 
Carrie_Carpenter, water pitcher, 



the ' bedside of her husband in 
Cincinnati, one night last week. 

Mra Laura Conner has returned 
after a three week's visit with her 



i° h .£ n P rf CV l ? UC uV •**! £i PP . er "•'J I daughters in FrancesvUle neigh 
mustard set, Wm. Aydlotte, fruit borhood 

stand, Mr. and Mrs. George Scott, „"k* ™„rn a .. 

syrup pitcher, Mrs. Joe Baxter „"£?.• ^f*^", f ,,d , w| ^ ll a 
rake plate, Mr and Mrs. Lou ! £, ? af "' Benj^Paddaek and Hu- 
Thorauson, mayonnaise sot, . Beu- 1 bert Conner were at Lexington 
lah Roberts, picture, Oscie Tas- I • evpr «> days lajt wk 
tleman, bath towels, Dr Snye^ The funeral sefVlea of Mike 
and wife, dresser scarf, G. W. Stahl, of Prancesvllle ueighbor- 
Marksberry and family, one half hood, were held hero Saturday af- 
dosen towels, Mrs. Bauer* and t»rttOO« at I :30, Kev Koyer, of 
sons, aluminum toa kettle, Oioor Florenw, conducting I he services. 
Met'i-andcr and wife, dresear scarf, John Dye and wife had asgueeta 

last Sunday. Litten lleui|ifliug and 
family, of m>ar Taylorsport, Hat* 
old Cilglei and family, Jeff Clond 
and wife and Prank Bossiaaa, Jr., 
and wife 



Pearl Long, guest t owels, Paul Hi*n 
aker, cake piste, I. G Ronaker, 
caaaerrotl, Mfs Wllhoit cram 

Steher and sugar bowl, Arnold 
>u«r and faaatty, water set. Mra 
Will Goodrldge, water pitcner. 
Mr and Mrs, J. O. Carpenter, din- 
ner ant, Warren Acre, fruit dish, 
Hugh Carey, aed sister, towels, , 
HaSftu kmanei, •beener erariy 



Thfusueily small crowd 
Monday but 
to have 
ar ether to lens) 



Tns* ueuaily 

sd noutt iant 
eaShXTar 



mmm 



wmm 



BUONE~COUNTY SECONDER 



THE EARLY ROAD. 
Dp and out wirly ; an hour'* p-vorcl.se 
In the homo sarclen. or A hrisk walk 
before a moderately lljrht breakfast, 
and rlieo — if business Isn't too fnr re- 
mftved from home — walk to It. That's 
a spring nnd summer prescription 
Mrhloh will go far toward keeping the 
doctor at a distance. "Catch the sun 
In bed" In time for the reveille of the 
birds, summoning him to rise and 
"make up" the morning. How many 
city people see the sun rise? Tet they 
could easily be on hand to hail Its 
earliest light where the view Is not ob- 
structed by skyscrapers. On hsind to 
drink In the freshness of the awak- 
ened day. You don't need any other 
stimulant for the day's work ; It's the 
best In the world ! It stays with us. 
giving heart and hope for the tasks be- 
fore us; tasks that lend to home and 
happiness, - under the twilight stars. 
Make the early start, and take the 
road with Morning! It's the time o' 
year when birds and flowers will give 
greeting on the way. 



The Greatest Mother 

SHU Has Work To Do 



The worst menace of this country nt 
present is, in our Judgment, the unbal- 
anced "parlor bolshevik." whose de- 
light in preaching class hatred Is com- 
parable with the delight of children 
playing with mutches. With what 
probably seem to the cult the most 
laudable Intentions in the world, there 
is danger that a fire be started which 
cannot be controlled. The inequalities 
of social strata are admitted, of 
course, for any fool can see that they 
are there, says Lowell Courier-Citizen. 
The thing needed is sanity in dealing 
with them— and sanity Is about the 
last characteristic that can be predi- 
cated to the average "parlor bolshe- 
vik." If only a few of our male and 
female agitators could be Isolated In 
psychopathic wards, where they clear- 
ly belong, the world would be Infinitely 
better off. 



There Is hope dawning In Russia 
that In Admiral Kolchak with the 
hour has come the man. The rescue 
of that unhappy nation from tyranny, 
anarchy, the riot of bloodshed nnd 
starvation Is a matter In which the 
whole ciejlized world IS deeply con- 
cerned, and If a strong man has aris- 
en who can bring out of chaos some 
stabilized government, that world will 
stand back of him and help the people 
to such national freedom and prosper- 
ity as under their^ archaic government 
they have never known. 



A New Jersey judge refused the ap- 
plication of an applicant for citizen- 
ship because the man had evadad 
military service on the ground of be- 
ing an alien. Taking the stand that 
a man who will not fight for the 

as a citizen, is one worth wide Imi- 
tation. The alien who sees nothing 
in American citizenship but its busi- 
ness advantages to himself ought by 
that fact to be barred from it. 



The commander of the American 
army in Coblenz occupies the royal 
suite In the largest hotel of the town, 
an Indication of the fact that In that 
part of the world kings are no longer 
trumps and that the deuce has taken 
the German trick. 



A United States murine, twenty-two 
years old. holds the medal for being 
the best shot with a rifle. A man 
somewhat older, who looks down n 
barrel of flour and provides what Is 
put over the kitchen range, holds the 
record of being ofa-nest hit.. 



Another investajftlll. „ '.ve twes- 
snry to throw light on a situation 
which finds so many people looking 
for employment and so many other 
people protesting that they cannot se- 
cure help. 



Incidentally, something worth while 
will have been accomplished when gar- 
dening science has progressed to the 
point of making one dandelion grow 
where two grew before. 



The price of alarm clocks Is up. We 
suppose, however, there are people in 
the world who feel that alarm clocks 
are essential to happiness, nnd will 
stand the raise. 



That's right. Deport the foreign- 
born trouble-breeders. If they want to 
break up governments they can return 
and operate on the ones they were 
born under. 



Bolshevism begins to turn pale In 
the region of the gills when It becomes 
tangled up with about two gallons of 
cabbage and corned beef. 



Berlin Is said to be taking up the 
fox trot. It Is several years behind, n» 
usual, hut at that the fox trot bents 
the fooso step. 



The country Is said to he short 1,- 
000.000 bouses. Ho here Is a -chance 
Car supply to shake bunds with ,w 



bo s ea m hi hk worse in 
than • ft*t#t lint It has 





Eleven, Million Accidents Every 

Year— 300,000 Bable* Dying of 

Neglect — Twelve Disasters 

• Annual"" ^-'UmQ for 
Relief. 



263,000 Men Still In Service— 
Twenty-three Wars Overseas. 



REO GROSS BETS CALL 

Fflfljp NURSES 

^■~^HREE calls for nurses have 
* come to the Lake Division 
Department of Nursing In 
the past week. 

The opportunities offered are sev- 
sral — overseas, In the navy, and in the 
United States Public Health Service. 

Applications of enrolled Red Cross 
nurses are being received at the De- 
partment of Nursing, 22nd and Pros- 
pect ave., Cleveland, O., Plymouth Bid. 

Patriotic senice^Ja still open to 
women who are training to be nurses 
In schools in this country, 
director of nursing at Lake Division 
headquarters, says:' "Prom the mo- 
ment a student enters the training 
school, little or no financial outlay 1b 
necessary. When she graduates the 
nurse enters a field where the demand 
baa always been greater than the sup- 
ply." 



LUKE DIVISION FINANCIER 
ATTENDS GENEVA COUNCIL 
OF THE RED CROSS LEAGUE 

a v PPOINTMENT of five Ameri- 
f\ can delegates to the first 
/ % meeting of the General Coun- 
cil, League of the Red Cross 
Societies, at Geneva* was announced 
by the American Red Cross today. 
The delegates are: 

Wllloughby G. Walling, of Chicago, 
vice-chairman of the Central Commit- 
tee of the American Red Cross; Otis 
H. Cutler, of New York, former man- 
ager of the Insular and Foreign Divi- 
sion; Mrs, Wm. K. Draper, vice-chair- 
man of New York County Chapter and 

formerly chairman of the Women's 
Advisory Committee; Samuel Mather, 
of Cleveland, form er~ member of the 
muilttee ; and' Eliot wads- 
worth, of Boston, member of the Cen- 
tral Committee. 

Henry P. Davison, formerly chair- 
man of the War Council of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, chairman of the Board 
of Governors of the League of Red 
Cross Societies, will accompany the 
delegates when they sail on the 
Mauritania next Wednesday. Mr. Da- 
vison was named chairman of the 
board when the League of Red Cross 
Societies was formed at a meeting of 
delegates from America and four 
principal Allied nations last spring. 

The meeting, which will open in 
Geneva March 2 and will continue one 
week, is expected to prove of far- 
reaching importance in international 
health promotion. 

World problem sconcernlng improve- 
ment of health and prevention of dis- 
ease; means of increasing the mem- 
bership, resources and effectiveness of 
national Red Cross Societies and 
methods of organizing and using these 
for peace-time service will be dis- 
cussed. 

Delegates from the following na- 
tional Red Crosses, members of the 
League, have been invited, along with 
those of the United States: Argen- 
tina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Can- 
ada, China. Cuba. Denmark, England, 
France, Greece, Holland, India, Japan, 
Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Po- 
land, Portugal. Roumania, Serbia, 
South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, 
Sweden, Venezuela, Uruguay and 
Csecho-Slovakla. 

The creation of the League of Red 
Cross Societies was the direct result 
of the universal desire to preserve for 
the benefit of all mankind the spirit 
and effectiveness developed by toe 
Red Cross during the World War: 



RED DROSS JUNIORS WORK 
TO HELP OTHER CHILDREN 



HOD relltf work tbU year Via 
to be the activity of the 



c 

\^A American. Junior Red Crosi 
i now organized in almost 71 

pee cent of the schools of America. 

"February 22hT is the last day for 
enrolling Junior auxiliaries in the cur- 
rent school year in your county." 
says Mrs. Harrison W. Bwlng. Lake 
Division Director of Junior Member 
ship. 

The year's work of the children will 
bring help to children suffering in this 
country or overseas. 

Friendliness between children of 
America and otfer nations Is being 
promoted by Junior Red Cross inter 
national semes for the children. 



The Red Cross 
Still Ministers 

i n | i ' mm m 




■&#**{ 




. .-.-'./- 



•fl*a*tf.5;- 



Equip Your Small Car 



1 MM 





Tires 



r Xs ) \f. 




If you own a Ford, Chevrolet, Dort, Maxwell 
oratiy other carusi^ 6 3Gx3*,30x3 1 /2-,or 31x4- 
inch tires, you can well take advantage of 
the high relative value built into all Good- 
year Tires* f 

You can well do so because you can secure 
in the small Goodyear Tires\the results of 
such skill and care as have made Goodyear 
Tires the preferred equipment on the high- 
est-priced automobiles of the day* 

You can well do so because these small Good- 
year Tires are easy to obtain, being produced 
at the rate of 20,000 a day, and because 
their first cost usually is as low or lower than 
that of other tires in the same types and sizes. 

Go to the nearest Goodyear Service Station 
Dealer for these tires, and for Goodyear 
Heavy Tourist Tubes. He. supplies many 
other local owners of small cars. 



x ■• 



30 x 3% Goodyear Double-Cure A ^ A0O 
Fabric, AU-Wcathcr Tread V ZU — 

30x3'/2 Goodyear Single-Cure $-| r765 
Fabric, Anti-Skid Tread A / ~~" ■ 



Goodyear Heavy Tourist Tubes are thick, strong tubes that 
reinforce casings properly. Why risk a good casing with a 
cheap tube? Goodyear Heavy Tourist Tubes cost little more 
than tubes of less merit. 30x3% size in wearer- $*290 
proof bag. J"""* 




<i 



* 



Pneumonia 

often f ollowa a 

Neglected Cold 1 

KILL THE COLD! 

BILL'S 

cascaraPJquinin 





Standard cold remedy for 20 year. 
tablet iorrrt— aafe, aare, no 
. atea— breaka up a cold in 24 
hourt — relieves crip in 1 
Money back if it faili. 
genuine box h«i i 
top with Mr. HUT. 
picture, 

At All thug Sun* 



a in is 

• Red 



FARM FOR SALE. 

324 acres,, good Tobacco Farm 
located on Frogtown Pike, and 
known as the Snow Farm. 

ELLA ALLISON, 
o f!8 Walton, Ky., R. D. 2, 



FOR RENT. 

I will rent my farm to a good hou- 
"st man for $850 casb, allow $50 for 
fencing or anyotber necessary im- 
provements. Write me if you mean 
business • - - i 

- MRS. J. A. ROGERS, 
o lmch Brookville, Mo. 



eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee* 

: 



Locust town 
edHarapshires: 



\j ,M 




Five months old boars and some 
good pigs. Priced so every- 
body can bay them. 

JOSEPH E. WALTON, 

BurllriQton, Ky. H.W. 1 



— Both Phokm- — 

DR. K. W. RYLE 

GRADUATE VETERINARIAN 

Boone liouae, 

BURLINGTON, a KY. 

Prompt Attention to all Calls. 



Attention into Owners! 

I am prepared to do first-class 
repairing on all makes or cars. 
Starter and generator work a 
specialty. All work guaranteed. 

Give me a trial. 

Earl M. Ay lor, 

' HEBRON, KY. 
Phone Hebron 



<.#»„<. fi. <•«.«£. <_ <* <-. 



WANTED. 



Men to raise tobacco on new 
groucd and work by the day when 
not in the crop. 

W. A. GAINES ft 80N, 
ofebS Burlington, Ky. 

R. D. 1. 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

r «S^PBMTIaST^S^ 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

Ail Work Guaranteed 



A. E. FOSTER & SON __. 

FARM SALESMEN AND 

LICENSED AUCTIONEERS 

No. 3 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 

Will be pleased to talk over with you, either the sale 
or purchase of farm property. 



v ->->>->> >v -> v •> 




•Better* tbaVrWc lover, 'and $1* to 
$16/ per bo. cheaper. Direct from 
groweY, Unhunetf, hulled, find spe- 

o-m4 R.D.4. Falmouth, Ky. 



* 

s 

I 
m 

m 

iir 

s 

8 

! 

i 



1 




T'S a wise idea to place your order for a car how, 
so you won't be disappointed in the spring. 



Hudson Speedster $2315 40. n 

. Essex Touring $1588. 

Essex Roediter $158$. 

Dodge Touring $1175. 

Dodge Coupe $1867. 

Dodge Sedan $2028. 

Cleveland Tractor $1395. 

The above price* are delivered at your door. 

If you want to place an order for any of these 
« call 



B. B. HUME, Burlington, Ky. 



cars, 



Or 

m 

Of 

5 

Or 

3 

i 




* Sayers Six 



rr 



\ 1 - , ■ 




».. > 



DOES YOUR MONEY 




! 

aw « wiMGIWte* 

*60to$2Wperac«. 

Wdt ^Sfm , S-L E . Agency. 
V*T0atf,^^h">n, 1 

{ ' A — - u l 





O. N. SCOTT, Agent 

PETERSBURG. KY. 
Call and let me demenetrate. 



sM eV M aV Saf ast sal aaf aal asr aa^asVas^ea^sslaalas^eaVeV 
!re\^»^!^r\^»T^r\^rA^r ^»N^r\^r\ ^rv^r\/ , a^s^^S\^St^ei 1 ^r\^"\J 




r 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



vol. xxxxv 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY FEBRUARY I 2, . I 920 



$1.50 Per l ear 



No 20 



COUNTY FARM BUREAU 

Boone County Farmers Organ- 
ize a Farmeri Bureau and 
Elect Officers. 



. The Boone County Farmers' Bu- 
reau met at the Court House In 
Burlington, last Saturday, and 
transacted business as % follows, 
only six precincts being represent- 
ed in the meeting. 

The articles of incorporation 
were adopted as presented by the 
committee. 

The By-Laws and Constitution 
were adopted' after being read to 
•l|\fce meeting. 

The committee to secure a 
County Agent was continued. 

The committee on securing build 
ing for office, etc., reported that 
he had secured an option on the 
store building owned by George 
Blyth at 415 per month and tne 
report was referred to the ex- 
ecutive committee when elected. 

'1 he By-Laws and Constitution 
provide that each precinct elect 
one member of the advisory com- 
mittee, and said committee was 
elected as follows: 

Geo. Penn, Burlington. 
Cam Kennedy, Florence. 
Walter P. Robinson, Walton. 
Colin Kelly, Carlton. 
Liaton HempfUng, Constance. 
Frank M. Walton, Belleview. 
J. Harry Stevens, Petersburg. 
* H. H. Cleek, Beaver Lick. 
W. B. Cotton, Verona. 
J as. W. Huey, Union. 
K. Lee Huey, Big Bone. 
Root T. McGIasson, Bullittsvllle. 
Officers were elected as follows: 
Geo. Penn, President. 
J. Harry Stevens, V-President. 
J. Colin Kelly, Secretary. 
Robt. McGIasson, Treasurer. 

The Executive Committee elect- 
ed were: 
J. Harry Stevens, 
■ J. Colin Kelly, 

Walter P. Robinson, 
Robt. T. McGIasson, 
Geo. Penn. 

The directors voted that every 
member be made a committee of 
one to secure new members. 

The directors voted to advertise 
in the Recorder for suitable secre- 
tary to do all office work of 
Farmers 1 Bureau. This secretary to 
be employed Saturday, Feb. 14th. 

Geo. Penn was appointed a com- 
mittee of one to rent the George 
Blyth building for headquarters, 
since it is -the oply suitable build- 
ing available. It was also ordered 
that Mr. Penn maintain the office 
until a secretary can be employ- 



ed 

Peqaons who have been solicit- 
ing members during the campaign 
and have not reported the mem- 
bers secured are urged to report 
them to Mr. Penn at once. 



Need Increased Production. 



Remedies innumerable have been 

proposed to help the exchange 

situation, the hign cost of living, 
, tin- distressing conditions in Eur- 
. ope. Many of these are helpful to 
*dre helpful to a certain extent, 

but most of them merely are ad- 
ventitious aids. There iu just one 

thing that can really help the 

world in this critical period ana 

thai is the willingness and deter 

mutation of peoples to work and 

produce. Adequate production 

alone can reduce the high cost of 

living, it alone can enable the 

world to feed and clothe itself. 

Extravalance, reckless expendi- 
ture, is inviting hardship and din 

tress for the future. Agriculture I need of food and the necessa rice 

and industry must npeed up it the I °» »»e is more Widely 
thru 



TOiACCO NEXT. 

Since the success of the move- 
ment for the total prohibition of 
the use of alcololic beverages has 
been attained with such benefi- 
cient effects leaders and organiz- 
ations in the work of reform are 
naturally turning to face other 
age-long enemies of the race. One 
of these «**--♦ recognized s- — **\ 
is tobacco. 

It is a reflector on the intelli- 
gence of a man for him to deny 
the harmful and demoralizing "!- 
feet* of the use of tobacco. In- 
deed this is very, seldom at- 
tempted, and when It is attempt- 
ed it is done in ignorance. 

Practically every argument that- 
is against thy liquor industry and 
consumption arranges . itsel/ 
against tobacco in a modified 
form. The tobacco user generally 
says that he doesn't think that 
tobacco hur:s him much. Or, like 
the drinker, he says that he in- 
tends to quit when lie feels that 
tobacco is hurting him seriously, 
and, like the drinker, he doesn't. 
Tobacco is a 6Cientiiic sin. There 
is no food v alue in tobacco. To- 
bacco is no more meat than al- 
cohol is milk. Doctors tell us that 
one of the chief causes of sick- 
ness and incapacity is the lack of 
nourishment. Tobacco hot only 
does not fail to provide nourish- 
ment, but it hinders the body 
in the processes through which ft 
appropriates food to its upkeep. 
It gives stimulation and inteferea 
with the normal appetite and 
leads to irregular eating. Its ef- 
fects on the brain and nerves are 
injurious. In the human organism 
it supports catabofism against an- 
a holism at vital points. Mo athletic 
coach permits smoking or chew- 
ing during' training periods, nor 
will a conscientious athlete in- 
dulge in these vices. God pity 
the man who in the greater train- 
ing period of life for the greater 
games of lire willfully handicaps 
himself. 

Tobacco is an economic sin. it 
drains the purse. It lessens /the 
production of jnuch needed food, 
ft decreases efficiency. It divert* 
labor from its channels of pro- 
duction of things which ure re- 
quired to maintain people at a 
decent standard of living. 

Tobacco is a social sin. Its use 
U ads to immorality and sexual 
irregularities especially in boy- 
hood and youth- When we look 
back at the friends of boyhood 
days we cannot recall a boy who 
went wrong who did not first use 
tobacco nor can we recall one 
who early used tobacco who din 
r.ot become immoral. Tobacco is 
^an_ offense and annoyance to la- 
dies do not raise objections to 
smoking in their presence they 
often object inwardly, and unless 
we feel that they do we lessen 
them in our esteem and weaken 
the influence and power of the sex 
whose -presence civilizes and re- 
fines ours, and we mi6s the bless- 
ing unspotted womanhood holds 
for right-thinking men. 

We might go on to great fength 
Tobacco benumbs the spirit is the 
conclusion of one who published 
his investigations of years into 
the matter of smoking It is filthy, 
and taints the breath, soils • the 
house, and spoils a man's appear- 
ance. But enough has been said 
by the way of commonplace 
truths. 

Shall we outlaw tobacco? There 
iB more sentiment against tobacco 
today than there was against 
drink a span of years' ago. 'We 
believe more thoroughly in the 
principle of prohibition. Econo- 
mics is being studied more. The 



RICH IN TRADITION 

White House Replete With Ten- 
der Human Memories. 



When President Wilson, because 
of his illness, received the king of 
the Belgians while propped up in 
fled, with a torn sweater about 
his shoulders, and told the prince 
of Wales that the bed in which he 
lay had been occupied by Baron 
Renfrew, later King Edward VII, 
and Abraham Lincoln, he added 
traditions to the host that a«- 
ready cling about the White 
House. Wjih this introduction .he 
National Geographic society has 
issued a bulletin on the home ol 



Stay With The Roads. 



One road working time a year 
is not enough. Some counties de- 
mand enough time to put the 
roads in good repairs, but with 
few exceptions all the time is 
worked out in one or two weeks 
in spring, summer or fall. The 
right season to do work on the 
roads, it people can get to it, is 
in the spring after the ..heavy 
rains let up some and the <>un 
gets power to dry- the roads up 
quickly. This comes in May usual- 
ly and if the roads cannot bo 
worked then, they should l>e at- '- 
tended to as soon aa possible af- j 
terwards. However, not all ;ime | 
should be used up then. Theov-| 
erseer should save some men and ! 
. som<\ team labor to keep tat- I 
the presidents, which, it says, has j roa ds repaired through the rest | 
more tender human memories j of the year. In nearly ever v month i 
than any other public building In r i ne year B ome work will be \ 
America. From cellar, where col- , needed and he should have a re- 
ored "mammies'' have cooked for i gerve to draw on for this «•* x | 
presidents, piea "like 'mother useci f Th?n before starting in- » tin 



AMERICANIZATION. 

MEETING. 



Sunday Afternoon, Feb. 22, 20 

Washington's birthday. 

The Citizens' Patriotic League -.' 
America is to inaugprate an 
Americanization campaign, Sun- 
day, February 22, at a pa trio io 
meeting to be held at the High 
School Auditorium in 
Covington. 



Thrift Is Still a Virtue. 



to make,'' to attic, wncre the 
Hooaevelt children playe 1 and 
romped, there arc associations 
which range from the quaint to 
the sublime. 

President Wilson's enforped dis- 
habille recalls the premeditated 
negligee — worn slippers, yarn 
stockings and old suit— by which 
Jefferson sought :o impress the 
IhRish ambassador with American 
democracy when that officii! ar- 
rived in full official dress to pre- 
sent his credentials. Early morn- 
ing callers on Johri Quincy Adams 
had to cool their heels until that 
prgsident finished three chapters 
in the Bible and walked down 
back of the White House for a 
swim in the Potomac. To "drop in> 
at the White House evenings, 
quite the sociable thing to do 
during Jackson's terms, meant 
finding the chief executive before 
an open fire, in an old louse cut, 
doing duty as a smoking jacket, 
puffing at a long pipe with a 
bowl of red clay. 

Every room of the White House 
abounds in history. Th^S oak-pan- 
eled state dining room knows din- 
ners of the homely sort that Jef- 
ferson gave when the Washington 
village butcher brought along his 
son, because he heard there was 
to be an extra place at the table; 



winter all ditches should be open 
ed well, any bad culverts repaired 
and some mud holes filled with 
rock. Again in the early spring 
before it is time io do much on 
the roads there is a great deaf of 
work in making it possible for the 
water to get off of the roads 
quickly and to fill up mud holes 
made during the winter. The ov- 
erseer's full report should not bo 
made until about a month be- 
fore time to, work again. If he 
happens not to have used all the 
time due on his road, he can hand 
the balance over to the new ov- 
erseer if one is appointed. This 
kind of a system if conscientious 
ly followed will really keep roads 
in repair and probably even great- 
ly improve some weak places in 
the roads.— L. R. Neel, in South- 
ern Agriculturist. 



HEART TO HEART TALK 



Rev. O 
is in 



C. Peyton, D. D. 
truth the word 



Of 



•It 
God »' 

This is Paul's testimony as to 
the gospel of Christ. It is God's 
truth. L originated in his mind 
It is the fruit of his companion- 
ate purpose. It is the essence of 



of the picturesque kind, like one j his grace. It is published to vhe 
given more than a century ago to *'°rld, by his command and it is 
the Tunisian ambassador, who spread thru his i ns p irat i on It is 

i pure like his nature. It is as 
1 staple as his throne. It is the rule 



was aggrieved because everyone 
would not withdraw wink' he 
smoked his pipe, though hiB sec- 
retary showed his good will by 
ceremoniously kissing the ladies 
present; of the bizarre kind giv- 
en by Theodore Roosevelt to cow- 
punchers, ex-prize fighters and 
distinguished men of letters, not 
to mention the famous ouo witii 
Booker T. Washington as A 
guest, and many memorable ban- 
quets, like those to 



The time has come for the peo- 
ple of this country to get their 
spending off a war basis and on 
a peace basis. It is time for a 
revival of thrift, a return to the 
good old idea that there is some- 
thing immoral in the wasting of 
money. We have had an orgy of 
"SHiDy making ; it is time for a 
season of money-saving. 

No one, of course, will think for 
a minute that we are advising any 
policy oi tight-iistednesu, any en- 
Holmesdafe, } deavor to save money by doing 
i without things that are really 
a? plans to establish j needed on the farm. The making 
bianch patriotic societies in var- i of money must come before the 
ious section* of the country for 1 saving of money in every case, and 
the purpose of prosecuting a vig- . ihe farmer who '-saves' by doing 
orous campaign in the interest without the things that would 
oi Americanism and to combat Boi ! enable him to earn more is real* 
shfvi-m, pro-G"rnvini-;m and oth- My a very extravagant cauzen. 
er activities tending to disrupt I Hut thers can be no question 
our country. | thai we have all been wasting 

A cordial invitation to attend {money of late. During the war we 
this meeting is extended to ail pa- could not afford to stop to count 
triotic citizens and families. 'the cost of winning it and we had 

All Patriotic Societies, Fraternal Uo win it, or all our savings 
Orders, Club?, and Civic Organi/-a- ' would have been worth nothing 
tions are urge! to attend. 

An appeal is mads to members 
of ail Churches of every denomin- 
ation to be present at this meet- 
ing. A special musical program 
in keeping with the spirit of the 
meeting is to be rendered. The 
concert will begir. at two o'clock 
sharp. 

The speakers will be Hon. John 
J. Cornwell, Governor or West Vj„ 
Hon. C. £. O'Hara, Williamstowo, 
Ky. Rev. Wm. G. Everson, Cincin- 
nati. • ' * 

In addition to the regular pro- 
gram, parents or other relative - , 
(the next of kin) of all Kenton 
County Boys who died in France 
during the great war will receive 
French 'Memorial Dcplomas'' is- 
sued by the French Govern men: 
Noman-Barnes Post, No. 70, Amor 
ican Legion, will have charge of 
the presentation of dipfomas. 

The doors of the Auditorium will 
lie opened at two o'clock. There 
will b? no charg. 1 of admission an i 
no solicitation of funds. Children 
under 17 years of ag? will not Le 
admitted. 

It is urged by th? Citizens Pa- 
triotic League of America, that all 
loyal, patriotic citizens give re- 
newed evidence of their abiding 
faith in America, the Constitution 
and the Fiag of our land by-at« 



by Which he works .It is the stand 
ard by which he judges. That gos- 
pel is God's message to you and 
to me, and to all men every- 
where. It sets forth his message 
in Christ that we may truly know 
him, his great love that we may 
believe him, the way of access to 
his throne that we may approach 



', So we put our money into it with- 
out regret and almost without 
thought. Unfortunately, too, we 
acquired the habit of putting it 
into other things, not so essential, 
in the same way. The result was 
j that we soon found ourselves pay 
ing prices we had never thought 
; of paying and often fo* things we 
i had never betore thought of buy- 
ing This general willingness to 
spend without hesitation or con-- 
snleration has unquestionably been 
one of the grea t reasons for the 
height to which prices have 
soared. 

Apples were sold in this city 
all last winter for ten and fifteen 
cents apiece. Every body knew 
that those prices were robbery, 
but everybody bought the high- 
priced apples just the same. Men 
who used to be satisfied with 
paying five dollars for a pair of 
shoes or one dollar for a t.hirt 
did not stop with paying ten dol- 
lars for the same shoes or two 
doliars for the same slrrt ; they 
bought fifteen dollar shoes and 
four dollar shirts. So all along 
the line. „ 

It is time for this foolishness) 
to stop, or it is going to be the 
worse for all oi us The farmers, 
with their inherited traditions of 



( him. That gospel— the word of 

Marshal Jof- ! God— demands our attention, re- 

fVe and Sir Arthur Balfou^ when Kerence, faith and obedience. That 

the china set of 1,500 pieces and | gospel is solemnly and stupend 



world is to puU thru the pres- 
ent crisis without danger of Ber- 
ious injury. Here in America we 
must labor with hand and heart 
and brain to the end that we 
may hold our place of security and 
prosperity among the nations. La- 
bor, not legislation, is the key 
which must unlock the doors of 
obstruction. Our own problems are 
grave, and will become more and 
more acute unless we listen to tne 
voice of sanity and profit by the 
lessons of world experience which 
have been written into the his- 
tory of nations. Work! Produce! 
is the imperative economic de- 
^ mand of the hour. Loans, credits, 
wage increases can settle nothing 
definitely. 

So far as Europe Is concerned, 
her destiny depends upon her re- 
alization of the necessity to get 
to work. She must work and work 
hard. She must live within her 
income. She must wait upon pro- 
duction. She must content herself 
with actual necessities. 

We have no love for Germany, 
but if it will facilitate the ad- 
justment of the world's problems 
to enable Germany to pay a de- 
finite part of her huge obligations 
rather than to see her go to fi- 
nancial smash, give her the 
chance. 

The world must bond to increase 
its production. This Government 
cannot and will not, as the Sec- 
retary of tho Treasury has said, 
go on in its efforts to aid the 
other Governments by lending 
mqre of tho people's money for 
that purpose It has reached tho 
limit dictated by prudence. 

The solution of the world's proi> 
lems depends upon thn ndcuuai 
production of *he things needed 
by the world -Enquirer. 

Qrent County Farmers Fined. 

.orsl Grant comity |*nd own- 
ers wen- fined in the (Irani coun- 
ty Circuit Court last week tot 

ttlnf the wotmIs «o m< 
■ long |M road aid* on tlirtr prem- I 
Una I 



felt. Pub- 
lic sentiment is more predominant. 
The Future will answer. In the 
meantime college men should have 
their convictions, and colleges 
will furnish leaders in the work 
of this and other reforms.— The 
Georgetonian. 



Boone County Boys Enlist. 

Captain W. E. Piynn, Recruiting 
Officer, U. S. Army, now station- 
ed in Petersburg, has accepte-i 
James E. Nixon, of R. B. 1, Bur- 
lington, and Robert E. Holt, of 
Petersburg, Kentucky, for the If. 
S Army. These men were enlisted 
for the Chemical Warfare Service, 
for one year, and will be sent to 
one of the schools, to take up a 
course in one of tne many trades 
now offered young men. 



the famous cut glass, every piece 
of which is engraved with the 
arms of the U. S. were used. 

No room is better known to the 
publiq than the east room, bf 
late years the scene of brilliant 
receptions and White House wel- 
dings. It, too, has memories of 
a cruder democracy, when all 
Washington flocked there to r fol 
low about the servants who car- 
ried refreshments, seizing upon 
whatever they could get.'' and up- 
on one occasion two "ladies'' upon 
the chimney, pic -e to ge«. a bet- 
ter view of th? colorful scene. 

Recent discussion of ,gifts re- 
ceived by the president and Mrs 
Wilson while abroad lends inter- 
est to specimens of those made 
to other presidents and "first la- 
dies,'' which remain in the White 
House. The blue room contains the, 
most famous or thews, the go 
mantel clock presented to Wash 
ington by Lafayette, who receiv 
ed it from Napoleon In the green J 
room is the Gobelin tapestry* j 
i made by a process which now is | 
a lost art, and framed in gold, ; 
which the emperor of Austria 
gave Mrs. Grant. Near by is a 
lacquer cabinet, gift of Japan on 
the occasion of the first visit 
to its ports by American ships. 
And there are' many more. 



ously connected with our highest 
and our eternal interests. God's 
glory and our destiny are linked 
insuperably together. That gospel 
is to be received in your under- 
standing, your affection and your 
heart. As the word of God, you 
are to receive it meekly, believe 
it heartily, obey it promptly anct 
trust it implicitly. Beware how 
you trifle with it, neglect it, dis- 
believe it. That" gospef is to 

1 judge you at the last day. 

Over it Big Bone church, where 

! I have the supreme honor v of 
serving in spiritual things, I am 

'striving more "and more to bring 
to the attention of the 



thrift, are the people to so>p it 
tending this meeting on \* ashing- ; _ at lpagt it i9 to them to 

tons Bir chday. | gt their part of it . 



EMMET LEE WELCH. 



Emmet Lee Welch oldest son of 
August and Daisy Welch, waa born 
Dec. 25, 1915, and passed to a high- 
er life Jan. 31, 1920, aged 4 years, 
1 month and 6 days. Little Lee 
was a sweet child and in hii 
short life brought joy and sun- 
shine to the home of his par- 
ents, and. yes, we all loved him 
he was always loving and pleas- 
ant to all and was so indus- 
trious in his baby ways. In his 
last hours while hi.-. Iktlo bo «v 
was full of pain, wandering of hi* 
mind, was the thought of run- 
ning errands for his mama and 
was asking hi* grandma to so> 
some friends and smiled so bright- 
ly at thV thought of .hem. Trulv 
he filled his mission in his life 
of scattering sunshine. His lit- 
tle heart was full of love for those 
! about him and now his pface is va- 
il cant, we cannot hear the sound 
j of his pattering feet or hear again 
his baby voice in the song he 



stop their part of it ; to get 

back to their old realization of 

the value of a dollar, and to 

their old realization that the 

dollar that he saves or wisely in- 



people- loved Uy gj ..j will fo n ow 

i( ■li-nv-ilgrims to eternity - the Jomis .. and Josua said su ffer the 

1.1am, soul-saving gospel of Christ, lmle Cn jidren and forbid them 

the truth of our God. not to com;i unto me f oro f 8Uch 

is the Kingdom of Hmvmi 

His illnesb was of short dura- 
tion. He became ill Thursday 
A writer in the Lawrencebu.^ I ?ve and all that loving parents, 
Register, complaining of the creul physician and a devoted 
ty shown dnmb animal , reci 
the following incident: 



. ..« Peer Dumb Animal. 



C. R. RIGGS FATALLY HURT. 



Noted 



ResUurauteur Struck By 
When in PaMadena, Cal. 



Car 



TwotWeeksago it was thought 
that about aft the tobacco in this 
neighborhood had been put over 
the loose leaf floors, but i he lo- 
cal trucks are sti'l. bmy hauling 
the weed to market 



NOTICE. * 

See H. R. Loldy for Deloo Light and 
Power Plant who in now Delcn ■•*■ 
vle« man In ihlw pnuntj ; ha will bo 
glad to explains th« iieo«aslty Mini 
conveuiencM of D>U*o liitfhtn. 

Florence, Ky. U. I>. 
Phone, HurliiiKioit ;U!I. 



DELCO-LIGHT 

Tto complete Electric Ligbt sad 
Power Pleat 

Klt'i'lrlc Unlit unit [Miwir (or letl Hhoi 
> Oil nr* pajtlitf tor |M>or light. 




PRANK A. AVt'RHI ik. 

ttoaler lM Hul«KJ-l Iglil Pt s a a 
•ouib tejs-H. * .»o.«u 



New York, Feb. 6.— C. R. Higgs, 

restaurauteaur, widely known thru 

; out the East and West, died in a 

Pasadena, Cala., hospital last night 

, according to a telegram from 

that city received here today. 

He was struck by a trolley car 
as he was helping a guest into an 
automobile in front of his winter 
home there. 

Mr. Riggs was born in Kentucky 
i 83 years ago. His body will bo 
j brought here for burial, it was 
| said. His widow and daughter sur- 
vive 

The first venture in moderate 
priced eating places was made in 
Cincinnati when C. R. Riggs start- 
ed tho Manhattan restaurant more 
than 20 years ago From this city 
Mr Uttfgs branched out to other 
cities He finally disposed of his 
Cincinnati nropwty nnd invaded 
New Yoik Civ He was a muster 
of publicity an I his unique adver- 
tisements on Mil* of fare attract- 
ed wide attention 

Gat Ready For It. 

Neit Hatuidny is Nt Vatcnti 
day, on which duv n»' gioumt 

hog Mill ...mc follh *K« 
lug confirmation of his w.atftuc 
aat un the eevond day oi the 
mouth, and It *tll <«• i-unflrMtu' 
If he doe* or it M •«•• "< I * m ' 
his shadow 



"Another cruel affair occurred 
while the river was full of ice 
last week. A well known citizen 
went over to Kentucky to a far- 
mer's sale. He bought a cow for 
iMO The cow had a very sore foot j 
and could hardly walk. This was | 
the reason he bought her for so j 
small a sum. She had a badly , 
diseased hoof and could not paw 
the examination requited to per- | 
mit her to be taken into anoth- j 
er state. Some one told the man 
that the health laws Would not | 
allow him on the ferry with a , 
cow in that condition. He re- • 
plied: '"The ferry cannot run, for 1 
the river is full of ice. I will I 
drive her up the river a few- 
miles, tie her to a skiff and make 
her swim.'' The poor, sdck, lame 
■nimal was tied by a rope around > 
her neck, pulled into the ice fill- 
ed river and forced to swim af- 
ter being driven miles on a sore 
hoof. When the skiff landed near 
the flour mill the man found that 
the cow had died Th» owne* dl I 
not care very mueh as theeowM 
hide was worth almost the pur- 
chase price. 

"I have been unable to sleep or I 
account of thinking of thnt poor, " 
dumb animal being como'l c I t > . 
walk miles on a sore fb >t, then I 
forced into a river full of float- j 
ing ice'' 

Soaldtd to Death. 

-doaio R MrAdinn, son of Ihe j 
late Andrew J and Doshli UcAd ' 
ama, WhOM home 1 1 on ' " l " 
Htrwt, employed at the i in-endale 
plant of the Mutcnx ill- Luml •' , 
ami Veneer Company, fell Into i | 
vit of twilling water ut > t" I 

Tuesday and waa M Muhtrui- 
lv burned that he aspired at ll 

. k \ ouua MrAdam* was 43 
\ears of a*' "' ' 

<•«• ss 

N > 1 1. N\ 'I I I "\ 

t.a>» • rMiceiHii K >'«gi- 



coiild do to save, was unavailing 
and at 10 o'clock Saturday, Jai:. 
31, little Lee went to sleep to 
awaken in a land where are no 
chilling winds of winter, no with- 
ering flowers, no sorrow, no pain, 
i no broken homes, no parting, no 
j death. He leaves father, mother 
j one brother, grandparents, three 
I uncles and many other friends to 
| mourn his early taking away. How 
' mysterious is life. We cannot un- 
derstand why the precious one's 
{ are given to* us to love and be- 
' come wrapped up in our lives and 
i then to be snatched away like a 
sweet flower by the chilling 
! frosts; but such is life. We can 
i but put our trust in God, believ- 
| ing that He wills all for our 
good and that there is no wound 
s*> deep but his love can heal. We 
, are so glad He does give us 
; comforting spirit in these sad 
times for our Jesus wept at tho 
grave of Lazarus and His great 
heart of pity and compassion Is 
ever tender toward his children, 
the work of his creation and some 
i time, some where wo shall know 
I and understand for now we nee 
, as through a glass darkly but in 
i the hereafter we shall see as face 

to face. 
4 ANNA BATES. 



vests ia the only on? that wffl be 
worth anything to a man to- 
morrow or next year. 

The conservative farmer will be 
shy of the present inflated ' land 
prices. They ar? inflated, inmany 
sections becau3e they have out- 
run earning capacity 'of tho land. 
The man who can buy for cash 
may take a chance on them at 
present prices, if he choojes; but 
the man who must buy largely on 
credit should be very careful in- 
deed about assuming a heavy bur- 
den of debt at this time. 

Thoughtful farmers, will, of 
course, hold on to their Liberty 
Bonds and War Savings Stamp*. 
They are safe investment and af- 
most certain to increase in value. 
Money can be borrowed on them 
at low rates, and the owner who 
must have money will usually find 
it to his advantage to borrow on 
i hem rather than to sell them at 
a discount. Of course no thought- 
ful farmer is going to throw away 
good money on the wildcat stocks 
r.ow so fjpely offered and exten- 
sively advertised. 

Finally, the prudent farmer \yill 
keep his living expenses, his ex- 
penditures for things that are 
not essential and for essentials 
that do not add to this produc- 
tive capacity, down to a reason- 
able figure. He will realize that, 
since the prices of hie own pro- 
ducts are going down, he cannot 
afford to pay war-time prices for 
the things he eats or wears out 
or amuses himself with. 

Nearly all of us have been liv- 
ing above our incomes Just be- 
cause it was the easiest thing to 
do. We must get back to the 
ground again. The man with a 
three or four thousand doflar in- 
come who pays ten dollars for u 
shirt and fifteen dollars for a 
pair of shoes is the man who is 
going to be presently talking hard 
I times and clamoring for more 
; ctfoney. What such a man really 
; needs is not a large income but 
i j to be "bored for the simples.'' Ev- 
eryone of us who attempts to go 
on at a war-time spending gait 
will need the same thing.— South- 
ern Agriculturalist 



Hothouse Tobaooo. 

A very large and extra crop of 
tobacco has oeen raised by the 
stoves this winter Many have 
declared that tbev will 1m> more 
careful how they handle the weed 
hereafter n» it pay* well to hiv ( > 
a crop In nice condition when it 
is put on the market, u fact that 
has been demonstrate/l b>\ num 
eiovis sales the past month or 
two There la no time when a 
crop of tubMOO can he slight'*! 
ami the ow not not la* a w>aer 
thtMfby 



vttrfti peraoM in Ruruugtun 
had c<4de i*# uael wevk that ap- 
proached ih*> flu etege, 



Five Sundays in February. 

You may not have thought about 
it, but there- will v be five Sundays 
in February. This is the first time 
this has occurred since tssn, and 
it will be twenty-eight years be- 
for#4**t occurs again Since 1800 
ave been five Sundays in 
iiruary in only two other ware 
— 1821 ami lhji'lf 1900 bad MNM 
a leap year th" five-Sunday Feb- 
ruary would have nun.' in i mis, 

but tto one day ibit dropped out 
then put the flve-SundS] I cbru- 
iii s off for t %m-I\ » • I. -a 




$ DOLLARS 
" — If MM wni M • 

rw «il. « Tgy»»i t ■ 

aauan •*!» 

Ymtl M| h« ■>•"■ »••• I 



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rMsKi 






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aatai 



as^ilsMisiaaaanfli 



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THURSDAY FEB. 12th, 1920 



IOONI COUNTT ftBCOKDB* 



• 



WALTON. 



* 
« 



Jas. J. Leary and J M. Atha 
of Zion Station, si>ent Monday 
* her© with friends. 

Chas. L. Griffith returned Sat- 
urday from a business trip to 
Cleveland, Virginia. 

Little Alma Riley, daughter of 
the late Grover Riley, ia danger- 
ously ill at her home in Cincin- 
nati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jno. L. Vest aftid 
son Walter spent Monday at Inde- 
pendence and In Cincinnati with 
friends. 

Otis G. Bates of Ellis ton, was 
here Monday, having sold a lot 
of mules to E. P, J ones of Cleve- 
land, Georgia. 

Rev. Shepherd of Independence, 
will preach at the Walton Chris- 
tian church Sunday, Feb. 15th, the 
church is yet without a pastor. 

Mrs. E. E, Fry has been very ill 
with measles and waB taken to the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. B. \V, 
Franks so she could be properly 
cared for. 

Miss Lena Bolington who has 
been very ill with pneumonia at 
the home of her sister Mrs. J. H. 
Cunningham at Drtroit, Michigan, 
is much improved. 

Kenneth Johnson, thr son of J. 
B. Johnson, is preparing to enter 
the ministry of the Baptist church 
and is now taking the prelimin- 
ary work for the purpose. 

R. L. Hayes who recently went 
,to Los Angeles, Cala., writes that 
he is very pleasantly situated and 
has found a good position aa 
there is plenty of work for all 
who desire it. 

John McCoy and S. R. McCallof 
Dry Ridge, were here Monday on 
business. Mr. McCoy is the Mlas- 
ter Commissioner of the Grant 
Circuit Court and is also the 
cashier of the Bank df Equity of 
Dry Ridge. 

L. M. Gross of Elwood, Indiana, 
spent part of last week here the 
guest of his brother-in-law Geo. 
F. James and family. Mr. Gross 
formerly resided at Williamstown. 
and is now in charge of one of 
the largest banks at Elwood. 

Mrs. Katie B. Rice of George- 
town, was here last week, and 
through Attorney John L. Vest 
sold her farm near town, compris- 
ing 279 acres, for $21,500, the pur- 
chasers being D. K. Johnson, Rus- 
sell Ryan, J. G. Pennington and 
Arthur Dean, who get possession 
by March 1st. 

T. W. Byrd of Alexandria, Camp 
bell county, and Robert Shaw of 
Kenton county, were here last Fri- 
day looking up the estate of the 
late Dr. E. A. Cram who died at 
Great Falls, Montana, a short 
time ago. Mr. Byrd is an uncle of 
Dr. Cram and was the administra- 
tor of the Cram estate. 

Misa Emma Snow has resumed 
the position of operator in the 
Walton exchange of the Consoli- 
dated Telephone Co., a position 
she filled in a very acceptable 
manner a couple of years ago. 
Miss Graham Roberts, one of the 
operators, has been quite ill the 
past week. 

Walton Masonic Lodge had a 
fine meeting Friday night when 
the Master's degree was conferred 
on Wendell Rouse and L. D. James. 
A nice lunch was spread at the 
close of the work, and this fol- 
lowed by cigars and a jovial so- 
cial hour made the evening a 
very pleasant one. Among the vis- 
itors were Bro. J. F. Blackstock, 
of Saskatoon, Canada, and Fred 
Harrison of Carrollton. 

Mrs. Wm. Mudman died very sud 
denly last Friday at her home on 
the farm in Kenton county from 
heart disease. She had eaten her 
breakfast, and shortly afterwards 
complained of feeling badly and 
in a short time expired She was 
a splendid woman. She leaves a 
husband, one son Earl Mudman, 
and a daughter Mrs. Carf Alge, 
all of whom were home at the 
time. 

Geo, L Smith, of Landing, spent 
• part of last week here, andbought 
the residence property of Mrs. 
Jane Johnson on Main street for 
his daughter Mrs. Cynthia White, 
paying two thousand dollars for 
the property. Mrs. White and her 
daughters will move from the 
Equitable Bank building to the 
Johnson cottage, her daughters 
having, resigned as operators in 
the telephone exchange located 
in the bank building. 

C. C. Bedinger and wife -of Rich 
wood, who are spending the win- 
ter at Jensen, Florida, with her 
relatives Geo. T. Gaines and fam- 
, ily, write that they are enjoying 
the sojourn in the Land of Flow- 
ers as the climate in fine for rhis 
time of year. They are on the 
/Dixie apd Indian river, and right 
I across the river a specialty is be- 
ing made of the cultivation of 
beans which are now being pick- 
ed and shipped to New York 
getting $8 per bushel. There is 
also a great many oranges, grape 
fruit, limes and guavas grown 
there. 

J. F. Blackstock, of Saskatoon, 
Canada, was the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. John L. Vest part of fast 
week. Mr. Blackstock is one of 
the foremost progressive business 
men of that thrifty section of 
Canada, and represents the inter- 
est of the late Judge J (l.Tom- 
lim, Jno. L. Vest and D. U, Wal- 
lace in Canada, and a very warm 
attachment for him is hold by 
. these gentlemen because of his 
high class methods in business and 
his charming personality, as ho 
has handled hundreds of thous- 
ands of dollars of their money in 
businesu without any cause for a 
single dispute or difference, and 
nearly all of the businosa has 
been closed up, and thai uliii ( 
handsome profit to .ill 

Sheriff L A. Conner ami 
Harold, of Burlington! »|x»nl i < .i 
Saturday hen* on buainess Harold 
(Hmaer Is the Chairman i the 
American Loyal Legion of i 
oouoty an4» u smugiug the pre- 



! gram for the Memorial Services to 
He held at the Walton Baptist 
Church Sunday, Feb. 22, at 2o»cj >ck 
u Ben a fine program will he pre- 
sented. Rev. R L. Shirley of the 
Baptist church and Rev. W. 11. 
Whit taker of the M K. church 
have promised to take part. The 
memorials from the U. S, Govern 
ment will be presented to the rel- 
atives of those who lost their lives 
in the service of . their country 
during the recent war as a 
tribute of the appreciation of the 
government of the loyalty and pa 



ldi. 



triotism of these soldiers. 

Our community was greatly dis- 
tressed by the sudden death of 
Wm. F. Hance who died very sud- 
denly from heart disease at the 
home of his parents Mr. and Mrs. 
A. R. Hance, Sunday evening The 
deceased was employed in the of- 
fice of the Warlon Advertiser and 
had been to the office that af- 
ternoon and had returned home 
and was sitting by the fire when 
his father heard * him breathing 
heavily, and looking at him found 
him unconscious. Dr. G. C. Rank- 
ins was called but the young man 
was dead before he arrived. When 
he was a little child Dr. Bagby 
said he had a weak heart and it 
was doubtful if he would live to 
be a man. However he passed the 
examination for the U. S. Navy 
and was in the service during the 
recent war. Mr. Hance was in his 
23d year, and was one of the 
finest young men in the town, be- 
ing moral, upright, and of a most 
companionable nature he was lov- 
ed by everybody. The funeral took 
place Tuesday the remains being 
taken to Gallatin county for in- 
terment in the Hance family ceme- 
tery. 




County Clerk Rogers has issued 
777 dog licenses to date. At this 
time last year he had issued close 
to 1,400. The ''Tax Commissioner's 
book does not show any such de- 
crease in the number of dogs 
since 1918, consequently it is time 
some of the owners of doga be 
getting busy and securing their 
licenses. 



A Cincinnati party was in Bur- 
lington the first of the week and 
rented Library Hall in which he 
will start a moving picture show 
in a few weeks. 



There has not been snough enow 
this wintar to protect the small 
grain, but fortunately the weath- 
er has not been very hard oh it. 

Three big truck loads of tobac- 
co left Burlington on Wednesday 
morning for the loose leaf mar- 
ket at Walton. 



Having sold my farm known as The N'Yanza Farm, situated 

on the Dixie Highway, 2 1-2 miles of Florence, Ky., 

as I do not expect to farm anymore, I will sell on 

FRIDAY, FEB, 20, 

beginning at 10 a. m., o'clock to the highest bidder, 

The following property towit: 

Horses, Mules, Hogs, Sheep, 
and Farm Implements. 




Several car loads of stone have 
been received from High Bridge 
to be used in repairs on the Lex- 
ington pike. 



Sue, little daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Newton Sullivan, Jr., ha9 

been critically ill ior three or 
four days. 



Old Sol with the assistance of 
the wind settles the ground very 
rapidly at this time of the year. 



Mrs. Elira Rouse, of Erlanger, 
was visiting Telativej and friends 
in Burlington, Wednesday. 



Mr9. G. L. Alford, of Bondville, 
is the guest of her aunt, Mrs. 
W. L. Riddell. 



James D. Acra had a good day 
for his sale. 



Burlington is badly in need 
more houses. 



of 



(Sfassified Qduertisements. 



For Sale-FRESH MILK COWS 
AT ALL TIMES, 

CLAUD CONNER, 
LUDLOW R. D. 2, 
Near Pt. Pleasant church, Boone 
County, Ky aug. 20 



For Sale— Rick of timothy hay. 
S. W. Hall, Burlington, Ky., R. D. 
No. 1. 



For Sale— 45 1-3 acres of land on 
Gunpowder. Good tobacoc land. L. 
W. Stephens, 410 Columbia Ave., 
Lexington, Ky. 



For Sale— Work horse, gentle 
and a good worker. L. H. Kelly, 
Petersburg, Ky. 



For Sale— 15 shoats that will 
average 100 pounds. Fred Morris, 
Burlington R. D. 2. 

For Sale— 10 five months old 
pigs. A[»ply to N. M. Markland, 
Francesville, Ky. 



AUTOMOBILE— Ford Sedan, equipped with electric star- 
ter, shock-absorber, wire wheels, condition compartively as 
good as new. 

HORSES — One bay horse 10 years old; roan mare 10 or 12 
years old ; black horse 9 years old ; mule lCTyears old ; horse 
mule 2 years old; 2 mare mules coming one year old. 

COWS— Jersey cow and calf; one black Guernsey cow. 

HOGS — 3 sows and pigs, 9 sows to farrow in March. 

SHEEP — 95 stock Ewes, most of them 2 and 3 years old, 
will be sold 16 in a bunch. 2 Hampshire Bucks. 

CHICKENS— 75 fine hens and 2 Rhode Island roosters. 



FARMING IMPLEMENTS— Hoosier corn drill with fer- 
tilizer attachment, rolling harrow, iron land roller, Oliver 
three-horse riding turning plow, 2 No. 20 Oliver left hand 
plows, Oliver cultivator, 3 double shovel plows, 2 jointers for 
No. 20 plow, 2 jumping shovel plows, sprayer attached to 
barrel, 7-horse coal oil engine with grinder complete, 3 sets 
buggy harness, set heavy spring wagon harness, 4 sets of 
heavy spring wagon harness, 15 horse collars, 5 pair names, 

Household and Kitchen Furniture. 

One Cabel Solid Mahogany Inner-player Piano, good as 
new, sells for $700; oak bedroom suite, four posted solid wal- 
nut canopy top bed, Bent Wood churn, large heating stove. 



2rpair check lines, 2 leather halters, leather saddle, 5 pitch- 
forks, 6 bridles, hay-fork, pulley and ropes complete, lot tim- 
om seed, pair platform scales, lot baled timothy hay, hay 
trame, 40-tooth harrow, "A" harrow, 5 empty water bar- 
rels, 2 bundles fence wire, lot pressed brick, large cooking 
kettle and frame, hay rake, wagon pump, 2 large tarpaulins, 
set of extension ladders, chest of carpenters tools, 2 50-gal. 
oil tanks, barrel half full machine oil, hammock, lot trace 
chains, 2 pair sheep shears, plant setter, 2 potato diggers, 2 
hand rakes, seed sower, fence stretcher, wagon jack, sand 
screen, cement tamper, 4 post hole diggers, 2 scythes and 
sneeds, 5 shovels, 2 pair stretchers, 2 doubletrees, trippletree, 
6 singletrees, porch tarpaulin, 3 cross-cut saws, one-man 
saw, buck saw, lot tobacco canvas, lot of junk consistiong ot 
old iron and rubber casings, piece of wire rope, pipe vice, 
bench wrench, grass seed stripper, hay knife, anvil, 15 gal- 
lon iron kettle, 2 grind stones. ' 



VEHICLES — No. 3 Columbus wagon comparatively good 
as new, good log wagon, spring wagon, open surrey, 2 sets 
running gears suitable for spring wagons, 2 -horse sled, log 
sled. 



Kitchen table, lot of brooms, sewing machine, 2 small can- 
non stoves, one room size rug, No. 4 1-2 cream separator, 
never been used more than one month. 



TERMS OIF SJLXj!E3. 

All sums of $15.00 and under, cash; all sums above that amount will be given 
12 months time without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved secu- 
rity, negotiable and payable in Florence Deposit Bank, before removin property 

Arrangements will be made for trains Nos. 28 and 27 to stop at Devon there you will be met 
by automobiles to take you to the sale. 

J. B. SANDERS. 

Lunch will be served by the Ladies of the Hopeful Aid Society. 



For Sale— Five tons of baled 
timothy hay. Apply to E. i. 
Rouse & Son, Hebron phone. 



For Sale— Four tons mixed hay. 
C. H. Bristow, Union, Ky. Far- 
mers phone. 

For Sale— Good mule coming 1 
years old also good work horae 
nine years old. Hubert White, Bur 
lington R. D. 2 

For Sale— Eight shoats that will 
weigh about 45 pounds each. Call 
on VV. H. Egglcston near Frances- 
ville. Phone on Hebron line. 



For Sale-Three sows with pig»; 
eight shoats; three year old Jer- 
sey cow. John Cave,' Jr., Burlinz- 
loa H. D. 3. 



COAL 

Just received a barg ot 
Plymouth Coal 

Lump, 28c a Bushel. 

BERKSHIRE I HINtlEY, 
Petersburg, Kentucky. 



Established 1886. 

Bnonft 6o Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

Our record of more than a third 
of a Century insures the safety 
of your Funds and Satisfaction to 
you, if you choose us as your de- 
pository. 

N- E. RIDDELL, President. 

W. A. GAINES, Vk* Pr«ei«l«nt. 

W. D. CROPPER, Cashiar. 

G. S. KELLY, Asst Cashier. 



HrDunt' »»•!• io R«*d AH The Ad* In Thl# lMut.fl 



The Income Tax. 

Every unmarried person having a gross income of 
$1,000, and every married person having a gross in- 
come of $2,000 or more must file a return with the 
O'^tor o f T "* — »l Revenue^efoae March 1* . 



If we can be of service to you in this matter it 
will be our pleasure to do so. 

We feel that there is more in banking than the mere 
lending of money, cashing checks, accepting deposits, 
etc.; it is that broad word SERVICE to which you 
are entitled at our hands. USE US. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky, 

Capital $50,000.00 

Surplus and Profits . $100,000.00 

W. L. B. ROUSE, PrMlaaat. A. B. Kr.NAKER, CashUr. 

EDGAR C RILEY, Vk.-Pr... 
NELL H. MARTIN, Ami. C«.hi»r. L T. U IV, A.tt. ( ..h,.r. 



A 



A 



■ ■■ 



/ 



BOOtfE COUNTY RECORDER 




THURSDAY FEB. 12th, 1920 



fioeof Ifappeftings. 



Another rush of public sales this 
■week. 



Burlington 

lone. 



is surely in the mua 



W. R 
•work in 



Davrsinvjlle spent 
Newport. 



last 



The 
in a 



pikes in Boone county are 
bad condition. 



Howard Aylor is visiting rela- 
tives in Huntington, West Va. 

Read all the sales in this issue. 
There are quite a number of them. 



Everybody is selling out who 
can and those tfho can't want to 
sell. j>_ 

Menter Martin has rented Judge 
Gaines' residence and will move to 
it shortly. 

Pr. E. W. Duncan is home from 
the hospital .where hetf*pent two 
\>r three weeks. 



I Is' everybody going to sell out? 
'is the question that in being ask- 
ed on all sides. 



There have been three sudden 
deaths in Walton and vicinity in 
the past ten days. 



Mrs. Elmer Goodridge was taken 
to a Cincinnati hospital one day 
last week for treatment. 

The many friends of James E. 
Smith will be pleased to hear that 
he continues to improve. 



D 



I Lead In Prices. 

GROCERIES. 

Liberty Bell Flour, per barrel $13.50 

24 Pound Seek - 1.75 

12 Pound Sack 90c 

Granulated Sugar, per pound. 16c 

Hand-packed White Fish, 1 0-lb. bucket 1 40 

Navy Beans, per pound .10c 

Try a lb. of Nobetter Coffee— the old reliable. . .45c 
Dried Apples, Dried Peaches, Apricots, Prunes, Grain 
Hominy, Flake Hominy, and a' choice selection of 
canned Goods at very reasonable prices. 



I 



GRASS SEED. 



Kentucky wheat growers are not 
ry much 
outlook for the coming crop. 



cy 
very much encouraged by the 



W. E. Glacken, of Rich wood, 
idronped in to see the Recorder 
while in town last Saturday. 



The Farmers' Burean headquar- 
ters will be in the store building 
until recently occupied by M. L. 
Riddell. - 

The flu in a mild form got a Jate 
•tart this winter, but there has 
been a great deal of it over the 
country. 

E. M. Arnold and wife were call- 
ed to Falmouth last Friday on 
account of the serious illness of. 
his sister. 

There will be services at Flor- 
ence Baptist church every Sun- 
day night 'by the pastor until fur- 
ther notice. ^^ 

Heavy trucks are said to have 
begun breaking through the Lex- 
ington pjke in the neighborhood 
of Richwood. 



I carry a stock of the highest tested that money 
can buy. 

Buy your grass seed NOW for they are going 
higher every day. I can not quote prices for they 
are changing almost every day. 

GIVE ME YOUR ORDER. 



Mr. Kerr will take charge of 
Eddins Bros., garage in a few 
weeks. He has had considerable 
experience along that line. 



The legislature has been in ses- 
sion since the. first of the year 
but has not turned the State 
topsy-turvy as was expected. 

The local school was dismissed 
indefinitely Mondsy morning be- 
cause of some of the pupil.i hav- 
ing been exposed to the flu. 

At the point where Washington, 
and Jefferson streets cross a dan- 
gerous mud hole threatens to 
develop. It looks like a good 
place to apply some town 



AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES. 

Diamond Tread Goodyear Tires 30x3 ' $19.50 

Goodrich Nobby Tread Tires 30x3 h 19.00 

Other sizes in stock — Prices Accordingly. 

DRY GOODS. 

A Real Nice Line to Select from. 

Latest Patterns of Dress Ginghams, per yd 28c 

Fancy Apron Ginghams, per yd 28c 

Calico, nice assortment, per yd 25c 

Sheeting, Crash, Shirting, Muslin, Ribbon, Sansilk, 

Crochet, and Knitting Cotton, Braids.and other articles, 

in Dry Goods at reasonable prices. 
HARDWARE- A complete line of all kinds of Hard- 
ware and Farm Machinery, such as Tractors, Farm Wa- 
gons, Harrows, Plows, Cultivators. Anything you need 
in this line I have in stock. 

HARNESS— Full sets of Harness, Buggy Harness, Col- 
lars, Checklines, and any part of harness you may need. 

I carry the most complete line of any store in the county. 
You jp/ill find my prices right on anything in my store. 
GIVE ME A CALL. 



D 



Northern Kentucky's Greatest Store. 




Seventh and Madison Avenues, 



Phone S. 5640. 



Final Reduction 



on all 



Winter Coats 

Every remaining winter coat in the house has been given it's 
final cut in price for clearance. Included are beautiful coats for 
women and misses in plain and luxuriously fur trimmed models. 
Beautiful silk linings are in many of them. The most sensa- 
tional savings are offered in these four great groups. 



w 



l^ 1 

J 



KIRKPATRICK 

Burlington, Ky. ^ 




DIRECT DEAUNG PAYS BEST. 

When cream i» ready to tell, the hard work hat been done and yon should 
not permit any outsider to make an extra profit off your efforts. 
You can ship your cream DIRECT to the Tri-State and save from 3 to 
5 cts. per lb. of butter-fat. It is just as easy to deliver the Cream to a rail- 
road station as to a buying station. The Tri-State pays the freight and 
guarantees your cream against lots in transit. 

Mrs. Thos. Daulton, Peebles. O., writes on Not. 25, 1919- "I hay* shipped 
cream to the Tri-State Butter Co. for three years and hav* been satisfied. 
1 have sold cream to cream stations in order to return the empty Can with 
me, as I live 9 miles from the railroad and always lost from $1.50 to $2.00 
on every can of cream sold to agents." 




Coats formerly J 
priced up to 
$29.75 

Coats formerly C 
priced up to 
$39.75 

Coats formerly C 
priced up to 
$59.75 



11 

17 
23 



.85 



Coats formerly 
priced up to 
$79.75....; 



$ 33 85 




tax. 



Farmers A. W Corn, Courtney 
Walton and R. C. Gaines, of Er- 
langor, came ovor last Saturday 
and assisted in the organization 
of the Boone County Farmers' 
Bureau. ^^^ ' 

If— if all the buildings ate built 
inaPark edition to Burlington this 
vear that are now being talked 
about that section wilMB**, 
quite a lively appearance the com 
ing summer. 



65c 



Half the property in Burling- 
ton has changed owners in thcfa.it 
two years and in several instances 
some of it ha» changed as many 
as three times, and the changes 
are going on. 

Mrs. Alice Snyder returned last 
Friday from the homo of her 
daughter, Mrs. Cecil Gaines, where 
she went to assist Mrs. Gaines 
while her husband fought it out 
with the mumps. 



Judge Gaines will have a sale of 
some household furniture on Sat- 
urday, March 6th, in the after- 
noon"! He desired to have his sale 
this month but every day was 
taken ahead of him. t 

Judge Gaines came home from 
Williamstown last Saturday anrt 
remained until Monday aftpmoon 
when he returned. Monday was 
county court day in Williamstown 
and it always sidetracku the cir- 
cuit court 

Don't say anything about it, but 
the streets in Burlington are In 
abou* the worst shape they were 
ever known to be. The system at 
good sidewalks nnd a few good 
street crossings help out wonder- 
fully though. 



We Pay the 
Freight and 

per pound for butter fat 

week Feb. 9th to Feb. 15th, inclusive. 

The Tri-State Butter Co 

CASH CAPITAL $250,000.00. CINCINNATI, O. 

If you need cans, write for Free Trial Cant. 
35,000 cream producers find it most profitable to ship direct. 



PUBLIC 



SALE 



I will sell at my residence, 1 1-4. miles from 

Union, Ky., on what is better known as 

the John W. Hogan farm, on 




Saturday, 




21st, I 




ney Gaines were dee*ply grieved 
to hear of his death. Every one 
who knew him loved him and his 
memory will be cherished in the 
hearts of many. 
W. L. Acra had a tobacco W. L Tipton expects to have a 
stripping one day the past week, sale of his farming implements anrt 
Henry Snyder has been visiting stock in the near future, after 
at Thos Watts' for several days, which he will leave for George- 
Wilson and Kay Rnlliff each hart town to make h^ home. We all 
sales last week and exi>ect to move | hat? to ** Mr Tipton and wife 

J leave our neighborhood. 
Mrs Ida Safely apent several I Mrs. B L. Stephens left Friday 
days with vMr*. Anna Gaines the -morning to spend several days 
nast week ! Wlth Ed Stephens and family in 

Miss Ida 'Stephens/ of Petersburg, ! Delhi, going by .the way oi Han- 
is visiting her brother. C E. Steph ; nibal. Mo., to visit Willis Arnold 
' „„ "' "i ?„ m iiv l and family for sin-era 1 weeks, then 

Miss Maggie Masters and moth-i< to her hW in \shland. Kan- 
er have been quite ill with flu for 



— The rollowing Property* 

Live Stock, Etc. Farm Implements 



proper 
Eddim 



M L Riddell sold his residence 
•rty in Uurlington to Stanley 
is one day the paid, week >»r 
¥3,500 Mr. Kdiiins sell* frequently 
ami buys often. Mr Kddlm h now 
planning to i>»d'i one or twopew 
l«aidO!ioc» tldi yen 



H i Nullum, of Rloranee, ««* 

«.\«-i lui Friday, looking ulP'r 

Vus.ii.eM Mr Norman has a m'«« 

,«T»oti«l property advsrtlaoii 

Tor the lath Ust „ shortly after 

K he wilt move to In* 

hr will aitgag* In huaitiMM 



whp> 
wh#» 



several days, but are better. 

Joseph Birklo sent a very fine 
four weeks old calf to market one 
day last week which realized him 
134. 

Milton Souther, of the Idlewiki 
neighborhood, has been confined 
to the* house for a week with a 

W'VCPt" col'l 

Our mail man Mr. Elijah Steph- 
ens, has ouite a time getting ov- 
er his nnito now as the roads are 
getting very bad. 

The weather tho paal week has 
been good, only for planning the 
year>n crop, tending the stock 
and s.noking meat. 

Miss Alene Stephenn, accompan- 
ied her aunt, Mrs II L. Stephen*, 
to Delhi, for several days' vi-iil 
with her uncle, lid Stephens. 

Mr and Mrs k. K. Stephens en 
tertalued -last Wednesday Mr* M 
Ltsphena, Mr and Mas, Hubert 
Cropper, Miss Ida Stephen* and 
Mrs C It Stephens. 

Hun* Is a great cteaj of slck- 
m.'m especially in (he North ii*»ud 
bottoms wtuno the flu I* raging 
It. H H Numicllov has lr«*" on 
the pimp f i *t wee4»l 

uds o( John 



sas. Her many friendB and rel- 
atives hated to see her leave, al- 
though she was with thorn three 
months. 



W. L. Tipton, of Bullittsvllle 
neighborhood, came in one after- 
noon a few days since and left his 
copy fo* advertising a big sale of 
personal property on the IfUhinst. 
Stv the advertisement in another 
column Mr. Tipton will move to 
Georgetown to make his future 
home. ^^^ 

NOTICE TO KAKMKKS A nod 
wiiv to make some easy money U 
to come to my sale on Friday 
,li' JDth of this month, ami buy 
some of the fine BHBBP, ana 
some brood SOWS, and some 
young MUliliH 

Vuii can raise tw » or three Ut- 
ters of plg» ami thou! two crop! 
of la m Its ami Wool ln'forv you 
have to [MS lOI 'hem us they 
are sold OB U month* Mi... 

l have also a l*t or fine hay 
und .* lot »i (arming Implements 
l«k< notice t i •#>!<* '**»l 

J II MANIIICKH. 
t'ajMMI I'' «i"» IS noU'1 south of 
i be bt'Uugtua pike 



8 Cows fresh this month, 1 Striper fresh in 
March, 1 Striper fresh in Aug., 2 Heifers 
fresh in March, 4 dry. Cows, 2 Steers com- 
ing 2 year old, 1 yearling Steer, 2 Heifer 
Calves, Sow and 7 pigs, 2 Gilts, 17 Ewes, 
1 Buck, about 7 tons Mixed Hay, about 
8 tons Timothy Hay, about 3 tons Millet, 
about 1 ton sheaf Oats. 



Mowing machine, Hayrake, 1-h Comdrill 
Breaking Plow, ? double Shovels, 5-tooth 
Cultivator, Disc Harrow, 2 Scoop Shovels, 
Band Cutter, Crowbar, Posthole Digger, 
and other articles, some Household and 
Kitchen Furniture, Cooking Range, Sing- 
er Sewing Machine, Hayframe, Sled and 
many other articles. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

Sums of $10.00 and under, cash ; on sums over $10.00 a 
credit ot 10 months without interest, purchasers to give 
notes with good security, payable at Florence Deposit Bank, 
Florence, Ky., before removing property. 

James Griffin. 

N. W. BURKITT, Auctioneer. Sale to begin at 10 a. m. 



Will Qrow Finer Tobacco. 
indirutiotm are the frowere in 

this part of the count \ Will a«>ek 
to grow s toUlccu vory 'lgbt oj 
color this year, U itp|M«aring thai 
...lor shove nil ..tl.fi tit* i» what 

■overae th« market Color ami 
pounds beluga the ' " 

must boar In mind that prop 
t»r handling niaas* the oolu shu* 
to the heat advsultgu 



WANTED 
Mim to t»nre an Aeat. Beeretftry oi 
Manngei ol Hoono County r*e>rai Bu 
rsnu. Kxpsrlaaee la typawrUlng 
and bookkaoplng s« w«dl »»>* s g«iu<r. 
nt knowhdtiii of aMrleiillur* ar« da- 
.ii«.d All nepllostlwu* So Im» iund«> 
mi or lufoiu Bstimlfty. r"»»b !4lh, 
OKU fKNN, 
i haliuian >>r i tttiuotilaa 
HurltngUtu 



WANTED 

Mun p> eootreel ibeul I milt M 
roHd, gradu ami nth* 

K k. >•! tin I 
burUosiou. h.> it li-e. 

,l,Ul.d phou« M\» 

'« taKM tmh Hima »'*HeK' • 
»♦♦+♦+♦♦++♦»♦■»♦♦<'♦♦ » ♦ ♦ ♦♦♦* 






THURSDAY FEB. 12th, 1920 



— 



BOONE COUNTY 



R&CORDCT 



A 



Keep the Soil From Washing. 



The "best moans of preventing 

' waning go bach much fur- 

stop r fi n g wa h ■■. after 

tney have oic> formed Thoy in- 

\<>l\i\ ii st, 1 lv> m." of jinipiM' r»- 

V. id roll- 



PubSio Sale. 



♦- 



t a [on, which, moans 
ig Kind a cultivate 
: .■ grow n only one? 
tour years, thai t!n> 
never be left km- 
winter and tha thi 
be kept in pasturage 
the time :is po libit* : 

ihc return of ;di 
matter to the soil 



<1 crop should 

in three or 

HQjl .should 

during 

' land ahould 
( as much of 
; and, second, 
the organic 
pos.siblP. A 



I will offer lor sale at public 
nui; in to the highest bidder, on 
the Dixie Highway, near the 
Five-Mile House, at the Chas'. K. 
Deglow Farm, on 

l 1 , 1 ^ j Wednesday, Feb'y 18th, 1920 
at 1:00 o'clock p. m. 
the following described property : 
One team of Gray horses weigh 
ing about 1500 pounds, 2 Jersey 
Cows, one fresh and the other 
will be fresh in July; 1 Duroc 
Jersey Sow, to farrow March 10th 

— . Double Work Harness, 

ur? to result. Lancf o •. o • u? tt 7* 

from tho forest ^ et ^pnng Wagon Harness, Mc- 

Wpwing Machine, Hay 

e. Steel Turning- plow,. Scotch 

|Chpj>er Turning plow, One horse 

J live-shovel ^Cultivator, Shovel 

to take [lay-off ftowi Double-hinge Ilar- 

badl 'row. Two-horse Platform Spring 



soil well Etorked with organic mat 
It r an:! hence open, spongy and 
at tho same time tenacious, wash- 
es with difficulty. If hard anu 
compact from lack of organic mat- , Sot 
in- washing is 
newly cleared 
washes hut little, while the same j Cormick 

land a dozen w veai* \, . ! Rak 

when most of thr- organic matter 
remains from ihe original foreai 
growth have disappeared andnoth 
ing has been tirn -1 und< 
th i' piac '. wash *■•• vcr,- 
in spite of attempts mad: 



a 



nil" 



H Ml 

mod. 



i. 



IS 

h • 



V.li 



m w 
&prii 

■ 

, ! ■-. til 

ed is on 
lirl;ls, not 



ill 



itariing wa hea a 
hem a' u n 
l\ i u ' in the 
r act' in A Ii tlj 
ii this time w4U aave 
•uN ■ in the fottowing 
i : ummer, to say rtoth- 
• loss of valuable aufr 
prevented, A place 
ii - i . particularly m»ed» 
the newly seeded w heal 
o dy putting catches of 



straw in draws and other places 
where "Washing is to be expected, 
Imt also covering 1 all steep pointj 
with a light mulch of straw. In 
addition, to preventing washing, 
this mulch will he a big help in 
securing a catch of clover the 
following spring, Such points are 
usually tlun. and without some 
help the clover nearlv always 
i ails 

A 
soil 

tho bare corn stalk 'fields during 
the winter. Th? practice of leav- 
ing tolling corn stalk land I 
during thi> winter cannot be 
much rond.'mn 

ly becoming 

Th;- corn land should be either 
B (1; 1 to wheat, or a cover crop 
>n rye, if one* of the clovers was 
not seeded in the corn during 
the late summer. It will help some 
in the prevention of washing to 
drag the stalks down, doing thi.s 
around the slop? and no: 
down. 



pre- 1 Wagon, New Jolt Wagon, Dump 

much ' W:; ^' vn - sma11 to* oar Corn, Dou- 

ir.hiog b!e Trees and Single Trees, Mil- 

they er Range, b-hoie Cooking Stove, 

worth 2 new Milk Cans, 10 and 5 gal- 

nd use loo?i Milk CooIer « 5° Rhode la* 

, T |j^ j land Hens, 50-egg Incubator, Set- 
fall h.v. | two-horse Sled Runners, 5 Wilis- 
lev Barrels, Uuck Saw, Shovels. 
Log Chains, Forks, and many 
other Farm Tools too numerous 
to mention, 

TERMS- A 11 sums of $10 and 
under cash; over that amount a 
credit of six months will be giv- 
en, purchaser to triva approved 
negotiable note, payable at Er- 
tanger Deposit Bank, before re- 
moval of prooertv. 

J. M. POP HAM 




very common soure-* of had 
washing in the past has been 



are 
tea 
. It is' fortun ate- 
much leas common 



up a no 



FARMERS BOOSTED. 



Washington, F 

lion of us dess 
speeding up of al 
try commensurate 
ei.t activity of farmers 



h. 2. — Elimin.i- 

employees, the 

lines of indus- 

w'iih th n pres- 

and the 



Public Sale. 

I will sell at public auction at 
my residence on the dirt road 
Heading from the Dixie Highway 
by the old fair ground site? be- 
tween Florence and Erlaager, on 
Thursday, Feb'y 19th, 1920 
the following propertv : 

2 work Horses, 4 good Jersey 
; Milk Cows of which 3 will be 
fresh in April, 1 Shorthorn Bull 
IS months old, Deering Mowing 
Machine, McCormick Hayrake 
good as new, 1 Oliver Chill No. 
20 Turning Plow, "A" Harrow, 
Buggv, Carriage, 2 sets Haraes>$, 
double set Work Harness, Col- 
lars, Bridles, Checklines, Side 
Saddles, Grind Stone, Tobacco 
Sticks and some Canvas, Sin^le- 



"VVTJL1EN you see this famous 
* 7 trade-mark, think a minute! 
Think of the delicious taste of 
a slice of fresh toasted bread! 

That's the real idea back of the 
success of Lucky Strike cigarettes. 
Toasting improves tobacco just as well 
as bread. And that's a lot. 

Try a s Lucky Strike cigarette— 




oasted 



O/O Guaranteed by 



img o» m • 




„„ ltJ a luiauiuiuir pro tic, wem wuuuv.Dura, Diueoei 

the high cost of living prohlPitJ'& eam Freezer > Mllk Cans - Co; 



trees and Doubletrees, Iron Ket 
^ a ^! "_°/.? nl > r a. reasonable pro tie, Bent Wood Churn, Blue Belle 

Ice 
Coal 
by Edwin T. Meredith, on taking 0l1 Heater, Wood Heater. Lawn 
the oath of office today as Sec- SwinF, Piano and other thinirs 

re Tho y hL t£T lt ? r ? ■ tw > numerous to mention. 

Th« high cost of living prohlem tfpvtc ah .1 Vinn 
Secretary Meredith asserted, can- l h.RMS— All sums of $10 and 
not be solved thru 'h" efforts of un der, cash; over that amount a 
one cla B s but all classes must re- credit of Six Months given with- 

i common out interest, purchasers to give 
notes with approved security, 
payaole in Deposit Bank, Flor- 
ence, Ky. 

BEXJ. F. LONG. 
Lute Bradford Auctioneer. 



duty or "less and loss will 
be of fain produce to divide 
among tho whole peop)e and 
higher and higher will go the 
price of that which is produced > 

' The farmers of America' 1 f-aid 
Secretary Merediih, "are hearing 
their part of ih^ responsibilities 
but this high cost of living 
pro&lem is a natural one and 
they ash that it be appreciated 

li.v all the people aa a common 
pioblr-m They ask that those en- 
gaged in distribution, eliminate 
the lost motion, and not pu. L so 
great a Hurden upon production 
as there is upon ii today 

Public Sales. 

L. H. Voahell having sold hia 

farm and retire! from active life 
seU a lot of personal prop- 
erty at puMic s :l |i> <m t | M . nth 
inst. 

11 t'. Normari hiving decided to 
move to the city will have a 
sal.- on the nth of this, month. 

C- F. Blayback and E. K.Steiih- 
ens will have a Joint sale of live- 
stock, etc., on the i:th 
ary. 

Benj. Long will ent 
sale on tho 19th inst. 

W. L. Ti|)lo::, who )iis i salr 
adyertlted for the 19 h of this 
month, will move to Georgetown 

J. H. Banders will have a bij 
sale of personal [iropvrty on the 
20th ins';. H: j^ ,,,: certa 
he will locate. 

P. B. Kiddell has s-.hl bla farm 
which necessitates his havirta 
big sale which is udverMi 
the 21 s: inst. 

James Griffin, of Union neigh- 
borhood, having sol I his farm 
and bough* J25 acre farm inf'Iear- 
mont county, Ohio, wilWhave a 
sale on the 21st inai -^ 

Joe Readnour 



03 



Pebru- 

r ' '. 1 with a 



PUBLIC SALE. 



I will offer for public tale to the 
highest bidder on the farm of K. C. 
Surface op the Union plke,i8 miles 
from Fieri nee, Ky., mi 

Tuesday, February 17, 1920 

the following property: 
FARM [MPLRME yTB Good Read 
Wagon witli box bed and hay Bed, 

one-horse Nijriujqjnvagfc- *— *'uk- 
gy. 2 horse Oliver Cultivator, Oli- 
ver Chilled plow. 2 double shovel 
pjojyji. E-ahovpl Cultivator, 8-horaa 
i»bov«l plow, 2- horse sled. MeCor- 
inirk- mower. Hayraka, Double set 
Breeching Harness, set Buggv 
Harness, Bridles. Collars. Check- 
lines. Doubletrees, Log Chains, 
glnglerri es, etc., Eight milk cans. 
Milk Cooler, lot Cow Chains,' 
Spring Wagon pole, two Spring 
WaL'on Wheels, 
LIVESTOCK— s 



on 

i a w 



■I fo 



orrei mare ccming 
nine years old, good worker, and 
sate for family use, Hay horse 
coining fiv y, a ,-s «,ld and a No. 1 
Worker, and safa for any one to 
drive, draft roll coming one year 
ohl, thn e milk row- all under six 
years of age and giving miNc. one 
wit!, (all by her side, Jersey lu-if- 
■ r. mx moiiibs old, lol No I mixed 
hay aiel many other articles. 

: _ TERMS- Sums nj >:,.()() 

] der; cash, on Minis ov 

, ol' Niu,. Mont 
iv,n 



v. II 

wll 



ind mi- 

r K.OOaeredlt 

wlthoul fn teres! 

ourcham r to give note 

ayabie ai Flor- 



and T c. Wei 

il" on the 21, 



"I srrtirin 

I"vit Han! 

«' K. SLAV HACK. 



ster will have a 
of this month 

Having decided to enter 
mercantile business Coin nej 
will close oui hi* live stock 
farm implements at a public 
on the 27 di inst 

J. M. I'opham has adverti-ed 
considerable sale «>f livestock eu 
for tlu' 2*th Npn 

The abova sale are all advertise' 
in this Issue <d the Recorder 



the 
ope 

and 

SI I ' 



Ai I 
nil (In 
will s, 

One 
one r, 
half of uidk 



II tie 

red c 



Er.ra Wilboil, ol Plorenco neigli- 
borhood, wu» in Burlington lut"*- 
day. Mr. W'ilhoit has dadded to 
quit farming snd will close out 
his farm equipment esrly in next 
month st a nuldic »«lr, which will 
ha advertised in (he Recorder in 
duatime foi thu thud of 
moath 



11 -aine line and plsoe and 
me term, the undersigned 
following properl v : 
■w will, .-air by her side, 
* giving a gallon and a 
a day to b« fr 
J uly. 1 wo ( ows will 

the sjrgh oi Kehrusn 
ii' -ii March Bth, 1 

old l\tlfer to be |, 



be fr. 

Dill ( 



<l b 



lloeu. 



as- 



•1 1 1 



K I 



sun - wii 



esh in 

s!i Indole 

w In he 

IM con, |lt)( 'i \ , ;,|-_ 

|sli April 1. ubom 

Vi I luW cm 11. 

Wl I I'M | .N s. 
Wglll al l2oclovk 



1 of the 



(leorgetown The 
bong tick Haptisl church ha* „ 
Mrthed a deed to the «■,,„,,,,/ 
':"" '"' ""• tract on which 
church and sen .,,.• eiiuaum 

slgin il H \eai-, „ K ,, 1 „, |<M ' 

•soioi as pi 



Public Sale. 

Having sold my farm on Price 
Pike, known as the Albert Price 
farm, one and one-fourth miles 
from Florence, Boone county, 
Ky., 1 will offer for sale at pub- 
lic auction, on 

Saturday, February 21, 192Q 

the following property : 

HORSES AND MULES, 
Aged work Horse, team of work 
Horses 9 and 10 years old, pair of 
work Mules aged 3 and 4 years, 
pair of sorrel mare aged 4 years- 
and bred to Jack. 

CATTLE. 
Five year old Holstein Cow due 
to calf in March, five year old 
Jersey Cow with calf by her side, 
3 year old Jersey Cows due to 
calf in March and April, 2 three 
year old Cows due to calf in Feb- 
ruary and March, two year old 
Jersey Heifer, two year old gra- j 
ded Heifer, 3 two year old Steers J 
that will weigh 70<J each, two 
year old red Bull, 8 yearling 
Steers, red Steer 2 years old, 3 
weanling Heifer Calves. 

HOGS. 
Duroc brood Sow, will farrow in 
May, Duroc brood Sow, will far- 
row in February, 3 Shoats will 
weigh 125 to 150 pounds. 
FARM IMPLEMENTS, ETC. 
Milk Cooler, Milk Cans, Galloway 
Cream Separator, Bemis Tobacco 
Setter, Corn Checkrow Drill with 
'80 rods of wire and fertilizer at- 
tachments, two-horse Cultivator, 
McCormick mowing machine, Ol- 
ver Breaking Plow, 1-horse To- 
bacco Cultivator, box Bed and 
Hay frame, 1-horse Corn Drill, 
double-shovel Plow, 2-horse road 
Wagon, Disc Harrow, "A" Har- 
row, Post-hold Digger, complete 
set Blacksmith tools, set Carpen- 
ter tools. Phaeton Buggy, Runa- 
bout Buggy, set Buggy Harness, 
2 sets double work Harness, 2 
sets plow Geaps, Collars, Bridles, 
etc., lot of Forks. Hoes, Shovels 
and other things too numerous to 
mention ; Ladder 120 feet, Hay- 
fork, Ropes, Pulleys, 10,000 or 
15,000 Tobacco Stick* lot To- 
bacco Cotton, lot Lumber, 10 to 
12 tons Hay, 250 to 300 shocks 
Fodder, 400 to 500 bushels Corn, 
2 stands of Bees, lot extra Bee 
Brooder and supplies, model 1918 
Saxon-Six five passenger touring 
car, and many other things too 
numerous to mention. All the 
farming machinery is practically 
new. • 

Terms— All. 'sums of $10.00 and 
under, cash ; on sums over $10.00 
a credit of six months will be 
given, purchasers to give notes 
with approved security negotia- 
ble in Erlanger Deposit Bank, 
Krlanger, Ky., before removing 
the property. 

P B. KIDDELL. 

Lule .... M , xiUctio'uc 

Hale to begin st a. m. 



WhatRCL. 

Really 

Means! 




Town folks think it's High Cost of 
Living. Farmers know it's High Cost 
of Loafing — not on the farm, where the 
day is sixteen hours long, but in fac- 
tories and shops, where the workers 
want to quit after six or seven hours. 
This H. C. L. plus the H. C. S.— the 
High Cost of Spending— are the sky- 
rockets that keep prices up, says 

<ZHe COUNTRY 
GENTLEMAN 

I wish you'd read about The High Cost 
of Loafing in the Great National Farm 
Weekly. It would be worth the sub- 
scription price of $1.00 a year to you ! 



Farmers need to get to- 
gether to combat these 
city-bred notions that 
the high cost of living 
originates on the farm, 
and they can do it better 
through The Country 
Gentleman than by 
any other means. The 
fair-minded town folks 
need to reconstruct their 
silly ideas and find out 



what H. C. L. really 
means, and they can com- 
plete their education for 
$1.00 by subscribing now 
forTlm Country Gen- 
tleman. I'm selling the 
greatest reading bargain 
on the market today— 
52 big, interesting, help- 
ful weekly issues of THE 
Country Gentle- 
man for only $1.00. 



WHO'LL BE FIRST TO ORDER TODAY? 

John S. Early, 

Phone, Con. 379. Petersburg, Ky. 



Tk« CMatry GssUmm 

52 iM.M-St.S0 



Tbt Udiei' Home Jonrad 
12 Imm.-J1.75 



The S»t ordi j E? roing Pott 
MlMM*-$£.0t 



-r. 



f. i. Kassebaii & In, 

8R4H1TB & HAKBLB 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large Stoch on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Stimct, 

AURORA. IND. 

.O. E. Castleman, 
ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

— Offlco over— 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucfci. 



WANTED 

Boone County-farms to hoII. Ad- 
dress w. E, VEST, 
First Nat. Bank Build iiifr, 

' Covinqton, Ky 

1 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

%ohen Building 
Pike Street, Covington, Ky. . 



YOUR LAST CHANCE . 

To Get Government Land In 
Minnesota Under a Special 
Homestead Act at $6.25 Per 
Aore. 

Indian reservation homestead 
lands under Act of Congress pass- 
ed 1918. No improvements, res- 
idence or cultivation required. 
Long growing season, plenty of 
rain,no crop failures, good roads, 
churches and schools. The land 
will grow any crop that other 
land will grow, and more of it. 
This price covers payment for 
the land to the Government, in- 
cludes all entry fees, two yeaiV 
taxes and our services. Don't de- 
lay if interested. Call or address 

Minnesota Homestead Co. 

Suite 315 Tribune Annex, 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
—Adv. 



* 



Women! 



Here Is a message to 
suffering women, from 
Mrs. W. T. Price, "of 
Public, Ky.: . "I eufn 
feredwlth painful...", 
she writes. "I got down 
with a weakness In my 
back and limbs...! 
felt helpless and .dis- 
couraged...! had about 
given up hopes of ever 
being well orsdn, when 
a friend insisted I 

Take 







Satisfactory Glasses 

Our glasses are comfortable when 
fitted, and we keep tho^sso for you 
free of charge. Any time they get 
bent or out of "shape, call in and we 
will readjust them. 

Phone South 1746 
T\"D "W T31 T^T^XTXT WITH MOTCH, Jenrewr. 

-L/XV. IX . P . IrillSji IS ,613 Madison Ave. - Covington. Ky 




The Woman's Tonic 



I began Cardul. In 
A short wh ilo I saw a 
marked difference . . . 
I grew stronger rinht 
along, and it cured ma. 
f am stouter than I 
have been In years." 
If you suffer, you can 
ap-proctate what It 
means to be strong and 
Vwell. Thousands of wo- 
men give Cardul the 
credit for thc'.r good 
health. It should help 
yon. Try CarduL At all 
druggists. , E-73 



K£3 



K} 



MR. CAR OWNER 




You are nob using yotir^car much this wintei and of course you 
are going to am "ClatstS* Hsalf Sol* Tlr«s" In the spring. 
Why not send us your old tires now and Mel us half sole them 
whllf we are not so busy ? (Jet tiiimi in bufore fchl spring rush 
and be ready for nmtorliiK wbun niee weather ooQlaa. 

The Conry Rubber Go. 

34 Pike Street, -:- Covington, Ky. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
. Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



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IMPORTANT NOTICE. 
Watch the date following 
your name on the margin 
of your paper and if It la 
not correct please notify 
this office at once. If your 
paper has been discontinu- 
ed by mistake before your 
time expired do not delay 
notifying this office. All er- 
rors ar«» cheerfully correat- 
ed here. 



♦ 

e 

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♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



-r"T A ttttttt 1 1 ) t it M ' MM ♦ ♦ ' It 

Sulisorll" for »b# Hf HtDUu 

♦♦++♦♦+♦+♦♦4++++++++++++++ 



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m^m 



i^w 



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m 



THURSDAY FEB. 12th, 1920 



BOONg Cu(?NTY RECORDS* 



M <">. 5 . 



t> 



BALD HEADS. 

Tlx>y held n'linnrniPt In Connecticut 
nnd l. r >0 snt down to tables covered 
wiili Mowers nnd the best HiIiirs to 
out. There never was n more lively 
Company assembled, A shining pnte 
is the index irf a unillng mind. Rome 
fool people think n bnld hend la a ten- 
der subject, not to l>« referred to, cape* 
-ciully in the company of Indies, but 
Hint Ik an .unmltlj.Mif" 1 'rsleehood, says 
Ohio Stale Journal. Wo know a man 
who cultivated a long mek of hair, 
which ha combed over his dflmo to hide 
his baldness, nan* thnt hnblt he kept 
u|f for n while, nnd all this time he 
seemed to have n mlsernble little sor- 
row on his mind. Hut one day he 
whacked off that lock and nppeared 
with burnished dome before. the World. 
From that time he was happy. Ills 
bnld head made him so. we some- 
times think that men with grent 
shocks of hnlr are peculiarly miser- 
able. I Jut they should not despair, for 
Rome day they will he balder and wiser 
than they are now. 



Public 




The red carnation or the white' 
IV' white r,,r us, with Its freight of 
memories stealing over the winding 
trail of almost fifty years— rich mem- 
ories of love nnd faith and truth and 
tenderness; memories that k bless nnd 
strengl/ien, memories full of reconse- 
crntlon and Inspiration ; memories thnt 
moisten the eyelash?! as they recall 
a quiet spot upon the brow of a hill 
In the pines, and memories which are 
the vesture of an Immortal presence 
that remains fresh and sweet and con- 
stant amid all the changing scenes of 
the onward Journey, writes George M. 
BalleV In Houston Post. God bless 
the boys and girls who today rejoice 
In the crimson blossoms tney wear — 
the crimson of life — nnd God bless the 
boys aud girls who wear the white enr- 
'nations — the white not of death but of 
Immortality! 



We are astonished to learn, when we 
take the pains to look the matter up, 
thnt the twenty Latin-American repub- 
lics embrace a population of nearly 
110,000,000 people; that these people 
write hook*; and paint plctun*s; that 
they have built some of the most mag- 
nificent boulevards In some of the 
most beautiful and best-lighted cities 
in the world. We loarn that the better 
families have been In the habit of edu- 
cating their young men in the capitals 
of Kunipo, and that they are much 
more familiar with London. Paris and 
Berlin than they are with New York. 
Isn't* it about time we turned our eyes 
southward? 



Having decided to quit farming I will offer 
at public auction, at the farm known as the J. 
A. Rogers farm on the Dobbins road one-half 
mile from Progtown pike, Boone Co. Ky., on 

Friday, Feb. 27th, '20 



The Following 

Team of black match Mares 

Team of draft Mares 

10 Nq« 1 milk Cows— 2 were fresh in De- 
cember, and.5 will have cavles by their 
sides by day of sale, and 1 to be fresh 
in March ; 2 2-year old Heifers to be 
fresh by day of sale ; 2 2-year old 
Heifers fresh in May ; 2 1 -year old 
Heifers, 1 Jersey Bull 

5 Duroc Jersey brood Sows that will far- 
row by day of sale ; 18 Duroc Jersey 
Shoats ; 1 Duroc Jersey Boar 

Good Brown Road Wagon' with box bed 
and side-boards, new Hayfork, rub- 
ber tire Buggy full leather top, good 



Described Property: 

2-horse Carriage, 2 horse Cultivator. 
2-horse Coroplanter that has been 
used one season, Acme Harrow, lay- 
ing-off Plow, Iron Wheelbarrow, Oli- 
ver breaking Plow, Dixie Plow, 16 
foot Drag. 

2 sets double work Harness, set of Buggy 
Harness, set Carriage Harness, good 
leather Saddle and Riding Bridle, 2 
pair Check Lines, collars, pads, brid- 
les and halters 

DeLaval Cream Separator, 3 5-gal. milk 
cans, 1 8-gal. milk can, 10 cow chains, 
Cross-cut Saw, Scoop Shovel, Pitch- 
forks, Hoes and many other things 



A generation ago people were 
laughing heartily at Darius Green nnd 
his flying machine. Before the end 
of this summer somebody wMJl^Jump 
the Atlantic ocean. Jokes, like dreams, 
come true. The jest of yesterday Is 
the need of today. Even the .mother- 
in-law. the noiseless soup spoon, the 
flat pea and the milk mnn's pump will 
become necessities In time. 



A youthful prodigy who wns gradu- 
ated from Harvard nt the ago of fif- 
teen is now in jail for assaulting po- 
licemen, nnd the country will sit up In 
glad thankfulness to take notice that 
youthful precocity Is now getting what 
has been too long coming to It. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on all sums over $10.00 a credit of 
six months without interest will be given, purchasers to give notes with ap- 
proved security, payable at Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. 

COURTNEY POPE. 

N. W. BURKITT, Auctioneer. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock. 



H, W. RILEY, Clerk. 



For Sale-Pianos. ! 




.«, 



Now is 
Your^ Chance. 

W. C. Readnour with the Baldwin 
Piano Company has several new 
Upright and Player Pianos to dis- 
pose of at Bargain Prices. Prices 
to close them out quickly. For 
prices and terms write 

W. C. Readnour 

Walton, Ky. 



Tho hundred hllllon golden jnnrks 
that Germany will have to pny is go- 
ing to he somewhat different from 
the five hundred hllllon easy .marks 
that Germany thought she, was going 
to make the rest of the world pay. 



Darius Cohh. famous pnlnter who 
died the other day, was a twin broth- 
er of Cyrus Coblv famous sculptor. 
Tyrus Cohh. famous decorator of leath- 
er, however, has made a more pro- 
nounced hit. 



Polshovlsm In Russia will keep on 
fooling around until the rest of the 
world will find it necessary to organize 
a donation party for It and its victims 
to keep them from starving to death. 



^.Gradually the secrets of how the hoi- 
shevlkl op'erated In RttSSia nre com- 
ing out. A late dhsp-itch says that tho 
Insane asylums were opened and the 
Inmates liberated. 

Another war secret Is out: they used 
trees for radio towers. A the present 
rate they will find l>y nnd by that they 
won't need anything- At nil for wireless 
communication. 



Man never looks as lovely as the 
Adonis clothing models picture him, 
any more than the garden tomato Is 
like the lithograph In the seed cata- 
logue. • 



Public Sale. 

«, — 

Tnesdayjeb.mii 

At farm two miles 
west of 

Walton, Ky. 

On six months time without inter- 
est : 7 Cows, 6 yearling Calves 25 
Shoals averaging So lbs., pair 7-year 
old Mules. 2 .Mares well broke and 
bred. Corn, Alfalfa, Fodder, Cream 
Separator and Cans; also Hlack 
Perch aron Stallion, "Prince" and 
fine Jack "Hen" two excellent ani- 
mals. 

JOE READNOUR. 
T. C. WEBSTER. 



I 



German soldiers, It Is reported, are 
about to strike for blither pay. Wha^ 
will the Oerman government do — call 
out the troops to prevent violence? 



Now thnttthe front pn«e Is not so 
crowded its It wns. Mexico Is heglu- 
nliitf to "seethe with revolution'' agate* 



Grandpa. In the years Hi mine, to 
his little grnuilwMi: "(Ml. Ilun hsISJUl 
lh.ru upon the wall — I" 



Th# laaltst robin can find Ids lir.tik. 
(Sit squirming at his few! ilu*« Uuys. 



FOR SAL£. 

, Farm of s."> or 8(1 aero*, good tobac- 
co ground, 3 acres alfalfa. H or 12a 
coin ground, orchard of apples, pears 
and peaches; rest in grass. Price 
SW.fm • Apply f« A. C PORTORor 
Geo. Porter, Burlington, Kv, 

16799~ 
DIED 

In New York City alone from kid- 
ney trouble last year. Don't allow 
yourself to become a victim by 
neglecting pains and aches. Guard 
against this trouble by taking 

GOLD MEDAL 



i 



TRY QUALITY FIRST. 

WE HANDLE THE BEST. 

Now is a good time to- select your grass seed. 
Place your order before prices go higher. 

" — ■ I — ■■ ■!!. - 

Jack Frost Pure Cane Sugar, in packages from 2-lbs. 
to 100 pounds 18c 

NO LIMIT. 

Lake Herring White Fish, 8-lb. bucke t $1.25 

Lake Herring White Fish, 20-lb. bucket 2.50 

Lake Herring White Fish, 40-lb. bucket 4.75 

Lake Herring White Fish, 1 00-1 bs 10.00 

WE HAVE A BIG SUPPLY OF 

TOBACCO CANVASS 

AT A REASONABLE PRICE. 

Fancy Long Horn Cheese, per pound ..,...' 45c 

Fancy Full Cream Brick Cheese, per pound 40c 

Fancy Switzer Cheese, per pound. 50c 

Fresh Beef all the Time. 

• Fresh Bread and Rolls every morning at 9 a. m. 

PHONE US YOUR ORDERS. 

Lake Side Sifted Peas, per can 25c^2 

Lake Side Tiny Peas, per can , 30c 

Canary Corn, per can 20c 

Canary Corn, per dozen 2.10 

Gold Bar Peaches, per can 45 c 

Gold Bar Cherries, per can . . j 5u c 

Gold Bar Apricots (peeled) j *■ 5q c 

Gold Bar Tomatoes, per can 20c 

Gold Bar Strawberries, per can 50c 

Guliev & Pettit, 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



i 



I 
I 

o 

I 
I 



IidMlt ilifVMNP'TdT fle* IsrtsJsWI^dl 

TIME TO THINK. 

GET AHEAD OF HIGH PRICES. 
BUY YOUR SEED NOW. 

The seed market is jumping every day. You know 
that in other years prices of seed always advanced 
with the seasons. Save money by getting your seed 
early. 

TIMOTHY, RED CLOVER, SAPLING, ALSIKE, 
ALFALFA, SWEET CLOVER, ORCHARD 
GRASS, BLUE GRASS, RED TOP. 
Little Giant Seed Sowers- 

Hill's Seeds Do Grow. 

Expertly Tested, Pure Clean Seed. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 



DON'T FORGET 

To order your groceries with your seed, save mon- 
ey, three ways; Freight, Seed, Groceries. 

Navy Beans, per 100 lbs $8.50 

Lima Beans, per pound 14c 

New Catch Lake Herring, 100 lbs 8.75 

Ryde's Egg Mash of Chicken Chowder, per 

100 pounds 4.75 

Scratch Feed, per 100 lbs 4.00 

Leader Coffee, 3 pounds for 1.00 

New Orleans Molasses, 5-galIon can 7.50 

Holland Herring, 6-lb. Keg 1.35 



Northern Kentucky's I and 



United States Wheat Directors License No/010835- Y 




LEADING GROCERS 
SEEDSMEN. 



A Heartto-Heart-Talk 

How many times have you read an advertise- 
ment, "Walked right in and turned around 
and walked right out again?" We have 
no fear of you doing this here, 
BECAUSE: 

FIRST— We are judges of cloth and have the 
most dependable lines of CLOTHING made. 

SECOND — We know we give you Worman- 
ship and a Perfect Fit. 

Wachs' Clothing means complete satisfaction, 
and you cannot obtain better anywhere at 
any priee. Let us show you our line of Mens'* 
Young Mens* and Boys' 

Suits and Overcoats. 



• 



& 



Tha world's stands!* remedy for Udnay, 
IWai, hladdat and oris add troubUa. 
Holland', national remedy alnc. 169*. 
4BI drusjgtett, thraa slats. Qaarantaad. 



HUBERT RYLE 8c SON 

H«vnl .'■•-. and Hhipp<-rs of 

Purebred Hampshire Swine 

All'Stock Registered. 
Correspondence and Inspection Invited. 

We carry the blood line* of Lookout, Qensral Tipton, Silko, 
and the Dew prep strain. BsatHneeaf brssdlngto befonnd, 
they have siss and quality i*u<l early maturing. The best hog 
for tile breeder and tho be.<t to build up bin bunk Recount. 
Why rainti scrubs that consume more feed ami sell for teas 
money? Hampshire* fad at the Ky. Agricultural College 
d r e ssed 90 pet sent.; i.«ss than 10 pet seat teas, 



=1 



GRANT, 



KY 



Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 



ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

Subscribe for the Recorder. 
If Not Try It One year. 




, 4 WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish. Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 
Consolidated Phone 33. Farmers Phone. 



Philip Taliaferro 

Undertaker i Embalm er 

Horse Drawn or Automobile Equipment. 
Ambulance Service. 




«eod Our Advertisement and Profit dv Itvcm. 



1 



THURSDAY FEB. 12th, HV20 



BOONE COUNTY 



RECORDER 



BnnN£ CO. RECORDER 

PCHi-l-lif l> ::vi:ky TI1T7R8UAY 
W. L. Wlt>t>HLL. Publisher. 



"Ei 



J'i m< 01<< in Burling 
S»*e< 1 1 nT-c" Hun* Mm il 



After the Loan Shark. 

Tho Anti-Loan Shark Bill in- 
troducinl in tho Crcnora) Assembly 
*y iho Kentucky ConhM-cn.ee of 
"Social Work and known as Senate 
iiill No 16 and Houw bill No. 26, 
is a l>ill drawn up by the Russol 
Sage Foundation and has already 
passod Homo sixteen states, among 
which arc Indiana, Illinois anu 
Ohio. 

The Kentucky Conference of So- 
eial Work, in sponsoring the bill 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ * 

• ♦ 

• PT. PLEAvSANT ♦ 

• ' ♦ 

Howard Tanner is very ill of l:i- 
grinpe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stearns have sold 
their farm to a party named 
Story. 

Mrs. B. H. Tanner fell during the 
sleet and sprained one of her 
wrists quite doriously. 

Mrs. Sallie Souther entertained 
with a turkey dinner last Sunday 
for her children and grandchil- 
dren. 

Point Pleasant school is progres 
sing nicely with Miss Romena Car- 
penter as teacher. She is board- 
ing with Mrs. Howard Tanner. 

Members of Pt. Pleasant church 
are pleased to hear that the 
and working for has , opened | Christian parsonage has been 

offices in the Inter-Southern bldg | purchas.nl and all agree in think- 
in Louisville, to receive those who ; ing that Hebron will be a de- 
have become victims of the "loan J sii able location for a minister. 
sharks At that office they j jamea Tait died very suddenly 
may tell of their experiences and i a{ nis homo Jan. 31st." He was Nil 
escapes free of expense from the vrars <)K { am \ j s survived by three 
dutches of these,, lenders. grown children aaul a host of j 

lillion of dollars are bein,7 friends to mourn his loss. Funeral 



LETTER CARRIERS QUIT. 

•Washington. p r b 8.— Rural mall 
carriers are resigning at the sSte 
of 50 a day, W. D. Brown, repre- 
senting the National Rural Mail 
Carriers' Association, told the 
Senate Postal Committee today, ad 
ding that the service would face 
serious difficulties unless fiana- 
cial relief soon were accorded to 
the employees. 

He asked for a permanent in- 
crease of approximately 60 per 
cent over the present base pay 
of $1,200 a year, with a minimum 
base of $1,920. The increased an- 
nual expense would be approxi- 
mately $78,000,000, he said. 



State News. 

Bowling Green — Chastino Dun- 
aven, 80, formerly of this city, 
one of Morgan's command, died 
at Nogales, Arizona. 

Parksville — Samuel Hays, 85, 
and his Wife, 77, celebrated their 
sixtieth wedding anniversary with 



PUBLIC SALE 

* ' — . I.. 

■ . > I , „ i . ■ m • 

I will offer for sale at my residence on the 




Two 
loaned annually in Kentucky by 
■the Loan Sharks at a rate of 
from one hundred and twenty to 
si* hundred and sivty per cent a 
year. According to the stories tohi 
it the Conference offices a ma- 
jority of the borrowers prefer- 
red to pay this extortion, rather 
-than pay* the cost of a court 
trial 

The bill now before the Legis- 
lature protects the small money 
borrower: Every lender must take 
wut a license with the Banking 
Commissioner of Kentucky. Every , 
lender may charge on loans under hood 
$300 not „to exceed 314 per cent 
a month, which is equlvelaflt to a 
charge of 35 cents on $10; 88 cents 
on $25 and so on. To charge more 
than this is made a crime, pun- 
ishable by fine or imprisonment. 

The Division- on Remedial Loans 
of the Kentucky Conference of 
Social Work, the committee di- 
rectly in charge of the bill is 
composed of C. C Stoll, of Louis 



services were conducted by Bro 
Rupyan at Highland Chapel In- 
iiM-.nent at Highland cemetery. 



rTb 



Versailles — The Council award- 
ed contracts to the amount of 
$76,250 for the new wa'ier system, 
which will pump water for miles 
from Kentucky River. 

♦ i Whittfsburg— John Hall, 70, suf- 
BIT HASH. ♦ | fored a broken neck and instant 

• • , death when a box sled loaded 

♦•*•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦*♦* with corn overturned on a hill- 
Mrs Frank Hodges is very sick, 'side, catching him beneath. 
Leo Stepheni spent several days' M on t,cel!o — The Wayne Coun- 
Bt Cincinnati last week tv Fisca [ court fixed thetax rate 

Dr Kenneth Ryel, of Burlington. : as follows: 25 cents for county 



spent Sundav in this neigh bo r- 



-rille, who is Chairman ; Robert | Belleview pike 



Jeff Eddins and Wallace Rice, 
of Burlington, were business vis- 
itors here Monday. 

A farm bureau meeting was held 
at K. of P. Hall last Thursday af- 
ternoon. County Agent Sutton 
and R. B. Huey made speeches. 

Richard Marshall and wife mov- 
ed through here last week from 
near Enterprise. Indiana, to the 
Scott place on the Burlington and 



Vaughn, also of Louisville, who in 
secretary; A. T, Hert. of Louis- 
Tille; Dr. Frank L. McVey, of 
I«xington ; Thpodore Ahrens, of 
LouiBville; and James Q. Wheeler, 
of Paducah. 



COUNTY COURT NEWS, 



The following buainesj has been 
transacted by the county court 
this month : 

Feb. 2- Will of W. H. Senour 
probated. J. M. Lassing and Dr. 
ft. C. Rankins subscribing witness- 
es. G. C Rankins named in will 
as executor. Executor's bond fix- 
ed at $60,000, and executor given 
antil February 6th to execute 
bond. 

Feb. 5.— Henrietta Stahl appoint 
ed administratrix of the estate of 
Mike Stahl, deceased. Administrat- 
rix executed bond and Clint Rid- 
«tell, E. J. Aylor and Chas Scot- 
Horn were appointed appraisers of 
the estate. 

G. C Rankin named in will of W, 
H. Senour as executor, appeared 
in court and executed bond 
such executor with J 



The sale of the household goodj 
of tlu' late Mrs. Sallie Stephens, 
Saturday, was well attended in 
spite of bad weather and satis- 
factory prices prevailed. 

Charlie Craig is making altera- 
tions in the building he recently 
purchased. One part will be used 
by Fred Birkle's blacksmith Bhop. 
The remainder will be used for a 
feed store and truck house. 



QUIET AT LEXIN6T0N. 



and Calvert Arthur as sureties. J. 
C Bedinger. B. B Allphin and C. 
Scott Chambers were appointed to 
appraise the estate. 



Lexingtoe, Feb. 10.— Under mar- 
tial law, with United States sol- 
diers, the majority of them over- 
seas veterans, supplanting the po- 
licemen as traffic directors, Lex- 
ington today and tonight was 
quiet, notably in contrast to the 
riotous condition of yesterday, 
when five men were killed when 
state militiamen were compelled 
to fire in resistance of a mob 
that had undertaken to lynch 
Will Lockett, a negro murderer of 
11-year old Geneva Hardman, al- 
most at the moment of the jury* 
as ! determination that he should ex- 
D. Mayhugh j piate his crime in the electric 



chair in Eddyville prison. 

It is and was during the day 
a matter of comment that the ar- 
rival of the Federal troops was 

most timely. 

has been "determined, 



-lt- 



polies 

hisrh ex- 



say, that quantities of 
plosives are in possession of per- 
sons in the vicinity of the court 
house, in addition to hundreds of 
small arms, rifleB and ammuni- 
tion. 
The impression' is general that 



ge 
job 



-TDhr time was^when the girl ai- 
ways had her oye on the fellow 
who had a good driving horse, 
fcut the fellow who has an auto- 
mobile holds over the fellow with 
a horse so far mow that there; is 
no comparison. A girf could tell 
her fellow by the way he drove 

mp to the door, or by the sound ! the spirit of the mob was Buch 
of his buggy, but now she simply at that time that it, under cov- 
Sstens for the •'honk'' of hi* j cr of darkness would have made 
born. There is one handicap yet ; another attack upon the fatigued 
as to running an auto, it re- 1 state militiamen, Deputy Sheriffs 
quires both hands, but thia may I and policemen, and, if necessary 
he obviated later on. The tandem j to seize the negro, would have 
hicycle was not a fowling sue- 1 demolished the court house and 
eess as a means of locomotion to probably have set fire to other 
the young people although it was buildings in the city. 
touted to the skies first, and | Officers of the Covington Corn- 
there may he brighter days yet i pany of state guards, betor> *~*^t 
lor the old sorrel and top buggy I departure today for home by way 
if the girls of today and tomor- Of Frankfort where they were 



purposes, 20 cents for schools and 
30 cents for roads. 

Richmond — When Jailer Will- 
iam Burgess was called upon to 
produce Taylor Hurst in court to 
ar.swer an indictment for grana 
larceny, it developed the prisoner 
had kicked" out a window and es- 
caped. 

Lexington — The Berry Davis 
farm of 100 acres, three miles out, 
was sold to W P. Watson, George 
town, for ^45,000. 

Georgetown— The irand jury re- 
ported two indictments after a 
session of two hours and was dis- 
missed ; two defendants pieade 1 
guilty and that ended th.> crim- 
inal te,"m. 

Resolutions of Respect. 

Whereas, our Almighty Father 
has again entered our midst and 
has taken our beloved sister, Jen- 
nie Pearl McNeely, therefore be it 

Resolved, That while we deeply 
mourn her departure we will for- 
ever cherish the recollection that 
her life was a noble service, the 
memory of which will ever be an 
incentive and a benediction to 
those with whom she had fellow- 
ship. 

Resolved, That the members of 
East Bend Missionary Society ex- 
tend to the bereaved husband 
our heartfelt sympathy in the 
great loss he has sustained. 

Resolved, That a copy of these 
resolutions be spread on our min- 
utes, a copy be sent Bro. Mc- 
Neely and one furnished for pub- 
lication in the Boone County Re- 
corder. 

Committee— Mrs. Lizzie G. Acra, 
Mrs. Alice Clore. 



Tributes of Respect. 

Ladie s A i d Soc i ety of M E . Ch u rc h 



X, 



row are anything like their moth- 
ers of yesterday. 

The mob which attempted to 
Take the negro murderer from the 
authorities at Lexington last Mon 
day when several persons were 
killed and others wounded, shad 
full warning as to what to ex- 
peat and the soldiers who dis- 
persed the mob did their exact 
iontty. It is strange in what 
foolish undertakings people will 
engage under excite nent, but in 
this case there was no excuse 
far any undue excitement. It was 
a foregone conclusion that the 
negro would get the severest pun- 
ishment known to the law, and 
tfc* mob was only a collection of 
law-breakers seeking to destroy 
another violator of law. 



praised by Gov. Edwin P. Mor- 
row for their defense of the law, 
stated that the coming of Fed- 
eral troops saved the situation. 



(Seo. Blyth has rented his store 
room on the corner of Washin] 
ton and Jefferson streets to t 
Farmers Burrvvi which will take 
possession next Saturday. The 
Bureau is advertising for a man 
to take chargo of ita office work, 
a good job for the right man. 

For Several days Pr Yelton has 
been unable to anawer all his call* 
they came so fast From reports 
there is as much <>r nwr • iU-.-k- 
in thin county as there was 
Winter during the epidemic 
of infiuauaa. 

Richard Marshall, who resided 
iiv Indiana last year has moved 
sack to the Bcott place on tho 
■trUnfton and Belleview pike 

John a* Bark, who f«rmt*l on 
• T. 0#ia«# laud Uat yuar, h.i 
■MMW* W Uwm»*wr|. Indian*, 
vk*r* ha ha* • gookj )»»b 



tnaioo 



i.. 



Some of the truck owners who 
are laughing about how they tear 
up the pikes with their overload- 
ed trucks will laugh out of the 
other 'side of their mouths if the 
legislature pasBes a law requir- 
ing them to pay a license of 
from $30 to $75 a year to op- 
erate a truck and make them re- 
sensible for the damages done 
to the roads of hauling ~heavy 
loads 

With the new census switching 
the center of population slightly 
faith r east and a trifle farther 
S;Outh, the outlook is extremely 
bright for ('ii>cinna;i Incoming the 
real hub of the United States so 
far as population is concerned, 

County Clerk W R. Rogers and 
sister.-, Misses LUsie and Sallie 
, went to Walton Tuesday to at- 
I t.nl the funeral of their kinsman, 
I William Hanee, who died sudden- 
| ly Ihmi Sundav 



Final Report. 

Final report of JHMUsn's woik in the 

Bapilsl 76 million campaign: 
Quota ii»r Wonii'ii ul North 

Band Association HtO,000.00 

Amount pledged uml repor- 
ted >7,U67iO0 
Amount Brsdltfld tu W. M 
l' 179.60 
A* Mipoiinii ml. in uf WniiitiiH 
Work siid AkkoiMhi icmihI organiser 
tin i u k Hot oawpalan, i ti«Miie to sa> 
praatmy nupr«*olatlon uLjLf heart) 
aaoMwttofl »nd loyal ioppori 

ten.Uil by tlnirch dlrsuUui d-itni 

worker* and all who la »».' waj had 
apart (ahtflpluK toaoru. ,i,.|»i 

Ra*i*»o trail* 
MK8, K. B. BAYKU 



East Bund, Ky. 

As God in his infinite wisdom has 
seen fit to remove from our midst 
our sister, Sallie L. Stephens, 

Resolved, That we extend to her 
bereaved children our sincere and 
heartfelt nyinpathy in this their 
hour of bereavement. 

Resolved, That we send a copy of 
these resolutions to the motherless 
ones of this home; spread a copy on 
our minutes and send a copy to our 
county paper, also, for publication. 

Committee:— Mame Stephens and 
Mesdames Matt Hodges and Sallie 
Bodie. 

MONEY BACK 

PROPOSITION 

Last offer to get acquainted 
Best Winter Wheat 

OUR 

in Covington. 

Barrel in wood $13.25 

24 J pound Sack 1.65 

8 Sacks for 13.00 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
SPECIAL. 

A. L. LANCASTER, 

9th * Banklick St*. 
Phone S. 4745-x COVINGTON. KY. 



Dixie Highway, near Florence, beginning 

at 12 o'clock, 

Fetaarj M 1920 

The Following Property: 

6 year old driving or work Mare, 7 year old Cow with calf by her side, 2 -horse Platform 
Spring Wagon, rubber tire Buggy good as new, 2-horse Sled, 1-horse Sled, hinge Har- 
row, Oliver Chill No. 20 turning Plow, 5 -tooth Cultivator, single shovel Plow, log Drag, 
Mowing Scythe, Trippletree, Doubletrees, Singletrees, Monarch Jack, 54 feet 1 inch Rope, 
some 1-4 inch Rope, 40 Bushel Boxes, some woven wire, Tobacco Sticks and some can- 
vass, new Riding Saddle and Bridle, new Double Set Work Harness, Collars and Bridles 
new set Buggy Harness, two Leather Halters, 2 Axes, Scoop Shovel, Hoes, Forks and 
Rakes, Cross Cut Saw, Hand Saw, Picks and Shovel, 2 dozen Plymouth Rock Chickens, 
some Seed Potatoes, Milk Cans, Double Barrel Shot Gun. Household Furniture consist- 
ing of Cooking Stove, Heating Stove, 1 Mahogany Parlor Suite and some Beds, Chairs, 
Carpets and other things too numerous to mention. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; over that amount a credit of six 
months given, without interest, purchasers to give notes with approved 
security, payable in Florence Deposit Bank, Florence, Ky. 



H. C. Norman. 



LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer. 



PUBLIC SALE. 



I will sell at public auction at my place in 
Union, Boone County, Kentucky, on 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11 

The F ollowing Peron alty: 



»U'U»ry 



FARM FOR SALE. 

A farm of 14H acr«*s located on the 
DixUi Highway within it milcH of 
Covington in well restricted neigh- 
borhood, having good aoboola and 
churcheH, a large new 7 room houne, 
a hltf dairy barn and other outbuild- 
ln>fn, between W) alio lnOairen lobac- 
00 land. TIiIh year II) acres of some 
of the finest, tobacco in the county 
wax rained. Well watered, fenced 
and croHK fenced* None of the land 
amund tbit« farm ban Hold for leu. 
than 1900 per acre. 

Tin* Ih a real bargain, am K'dnir 
Into the auto bualnaa. and for quick 
Hale will lake $2H.OOO. AiIiIivhh 

o. w. wadk, 

Rrlang.r, Iiv.. 
phone Rrlangar, r»7-L after 4 p in. 
ufab H' 

NOTICE. 

I am now ngrnt Inr »v anything 
the Inlei o.il |.>n.«l IUr\«*»t«r Com- 
itany manufaetuiva Of handloa 
utility 
" I. KfHXPATMCE. 
Huitlttfloj), K 



1 good general purpose Horse, 1 Road Wagon 
with box bed 1 1 Hay Bed, 1 McCormick Mowing 
Machine in good shape, 1 Hayrake, 1 Single 
Harpoon Hayfork and 110 feet rope and pulleys, 
1 Sickle Hay knife, No. E Oliver breaking Plow, 
Hinge Harrow, Single Shovel Plow, Double 
Shovel Plow, Kraus Riding Cultivator, Single 
row Oft .. Drill with Fertilizer attachment, one 
wheel Dirt Scraper, set of Work Harness, lot of 
Hay---4 or 5 tons in barn, about 200 bushels 
of Corn— some white and some yellow, about 
2,000 tobacco sticks, 5-tooth Cultivator, set of 
Doubletrees and Singletrees, 2-horse Sled. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

zAll sums of $5.00 or under, cash ; on sums over $5.00 a credit of 6 months 
without interest will be given. No property to be removed' till terms of 
sale are complied with. Notes must be negotiable and payable at Union 
Deposit Bank. Sale to begin at 1 o'clock promptly. 

L. H. VOSHELL. 

GEO. BURKITT, Audtioneer. Sale>to begin at 1 o'clock p. m. 



Farm for Sale. 



30 acres on* 



Farm of 85 aorea locatwd about 300 
varda from new pi he leading from n ^'' 
DIxIh Highway to Union (known aa * DOU 
the Krogtown pike) I mile from Dix- 
it. Highway, thlafarm haaa7-room 
limine, mound collar, out Iioiin«. bug- 
K y | lim i«, chlukau liouao, H olatmua, 
wcdl and aoveral MpriiiK*. oow atahln 
for IH or A) oowa 2 tow of aUlla, feod 



Union and Hathaway 
pike, baa liouae of 8 rooms and all 



neceaaary out butldinga, all except 
t 6 aorea In grana. 

J. STANLBY UTZ. 
o f 12 Burlington. Ky., R 1) *2. 

MOST DESIRABLE FARM. 



imi aorea. HO acrea level bottom land, 
aliay bftwoen alalia, Halloa at and of ,7 room bouae, jrood barn and other 
b id allay, good .took o» tobacco I i„ii>iovi .nionta, noaraohool, I'hurohaa 
barn; alM.ut oiia-half of ihla farm li|lft„d railroad. Oood tobacco land, 
about M aor.. In wooda. All p r |on tla.000 

OfM M V. KIHMKIt, 

Uh*(«UUuUaK|ft> l"d.- # 



graaa, . 

uuulda llu. (mm naarl) •»«» 

Addr.aa Kl ( VA 






"bwwk; 



an.w, Kj- »*_ D. I. 
Phaaa Can, Walton N9. 



tU MkttftDl- 



TA%M YOUR COUNTY PAP, _ 
••♦♦•♦♦•a 



CHESTER L. TANNER 

Hri'tfltr aad Bhtpper of 1 

Chester Whites, 

1 R. D. 1 Florence, Ky. 

Young atook for Bale, aired by 
Sriil.'H' Choice, a Kentucky 
State Fair i>rUe winner, and out 
of mature how. of the heat 
bloodlinna. Alao 2 Red Sow.. 
Come and mi the». 

FOR 8 ALE. 

Vord Touring Oar lllld mod.d la 

condition Kor partlcularae.c anna 

I L Aylor or I.lnnl. Huaby, Kloranea, 

Ky Ub4 It 



I -.? 



V 



^. 




t 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY FEB. 12th, 1S» 



I 



"*> 



V 




"Trade Where they All Trade" 

Goode & Dunkie 

* -^ 

are doing more business than any other house in Northern Kcncucky. 
WHY? Ask any of our customers about our Prices, Trec'^ $$%* 
and Quality of goods. . 

Mr. Farmer-- 

Almost every day we get favorable reports on seeds we have 
sold. We do not handle low grade, trashy seeds. We know seeds 
and we know where to 4 buy and we give you the benefit of our 
knoweledge and experience, When you order from us you can de- 
pend on High Test, Purity and Germination. 

Send us your inquiries for prices and samples of CLOVER, AL- ♦ 
FALFA, ALSIKE, TIMOTHY, BLUE GRASS, ORCHARD 
GRASS, Etc. 

WE BUY RIGHT AND WE SELL RIGHT. 



Send us your orders for Granula- 
ted Sugar. We will try to fill 
them. 



Blatchford's Calf Meal,' cwt. $5.90 
Conceded to be the best on the 
market. ' 



7 Gcdfr<uu!tuntfi& 



mk' GROCERIES. FLOUR SEEDS. MEDiC/NES 
T 73-21 PIKE ST. 78 20 W. 7™ ST. 



WHOLESALE-'-CoTington'. Urge.t Setd and Grocery Howe"- RETAIL 

Covington, Kentucky. 

, Phones South 335 and 336. 

United States Wheat Director License No. 030057-Y. 
U. S. Food Administration License No. G-1770. 



PUBLIC ML 



at public 

residence 

known as 



Having sold my farm, I will offer 
sale to the highest bidder at my 
one mile from Bullittsville, Ky., 
Ott Gaines farm, on 

Thwsd^rFeb^ r49 r L 20 

The Following Personal Property: 



ulesand Horses. 

1* 8-year old lady broke Horse, work 
or drive anywhere, 13-yr. old Mare, 
5,-yr. old Mule, 16 hands high weight 
1200 lbs., 3 3-yr. old Mules weight 
1100 lbs., 2-year old Mule, all first- 
class mules. 

Cows and Shoats. 

Two good Jersey Cows 6 and 7 yrs-o. 
1 fresh, and several other cows and 
calve, 6 85-lb. Shoats. 



Farm Implements. 

Two stacks of Hay, Corn and Oats, 2 
Mowing Machines, Hayrake, Oliver 
Cultivator^ Breaking Plows, Hay- 
tedder, 2-h. Corn Planter, Wagon 
with boxbed good as new, Brown 
Wagon with hay frame. 

Household Goods. 

Two Heating Stoves, Phaeton Buggy, 
2 sets Buggy Harness, 2 sets wagon 
harness, and many other articles. 



WOOLPER II EI HITS. 



H. K. Aylor was sick i.i;t week:. 

Hi'nry Seikman who has been 
sick with flu t* recovering. 

For Sale— Two Hronze turkey 
hens. Mrs. Ed. Easton. Burlinjrton 
R. D. 1. " 

Lizzie Hewett, of Cloves, Ohio, 
is visiting her brothers, William 
and Leonard. 

Ezra and Cabil Beeraon went to 
see their sister, Mrs. Elmer Good- 
ridge, Friday, who ia at 
cinnati hospital. 

hm . . 



>KN t>OlV|IKK 



Walton. 
.<> treat 



« 

J. W Rousa called Dr 
of Hebron, last Sunday 
a sick cow. 

Ed. Slay back and wife enter- 
tained some of their city frit-mis 
the latter part of last week. 

This scribe and wife spent lait 
Sunday very pleasantly at the 
hospitable home of Mr! and Mrs. 
, R. E. Tanner. 

•The semi-annual meeting of the 
iJOTht Council of the Boone Coun- 



ty Charge will be held at Hope- 
ful, Saturday the 28th inst, at 10 

• o'clock a. m. 
^ I Some person or persons visited 

# j Linnie Busby's garage, it is sup- 
*♦*♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦«•««»«• ' posed for the purpose of taking 
Ivan Conrad, wife and daughter ™ B . machin£? - but » fortunately, tht 



FLORENCE. 



were Sunday guMts at Ben Lone'7 mach , im ; *"" in his barn "which 
Mfss Co,a y CrTwell withe Sun- ^ aR J° C ^ d They we 5 4 *° Ha / mo . n 
day guest of Misa qhrisUne Ren- Jon ?* Fhey mana ^ ed to * et 



aker. 

There are not less than twenty 
cases of grip in Florence and vi- 
cinity. 

Miss Mary UtfS in the gu<'st of 
her grandmother, Mrs. ArminU 
Pearson. 

Will Green and wife were Sun- 
day guests of hi» sister, Mr3 Eliza 
Arnold. 

There; will be services at 
Baptist church "<i<»ry Sunday 
til further notice. 

P. B Kiddell is confined to his 
bed at his home on the Price 
pike, being quite ill. 



the 
un- 



machine out by opening up the 
back end of the garage, but for 
some cause they left it and went 
to Geo. Miller's, where they suc- 
ceeded in getting his machine and 
started off with it but it skidded 
and get in a ditch and they had 
to leave it, otherwise the ma- 
chine would have b^en swiped. 



Mrs. Cam Kennedy sold a dozen, dice, 
hens last week that brought $27, 
an average of $2.25 per hen. 

The ladles of Florence Christian 
church will give a lunch at P. B. 
Riddeli's sale on the 21at inst 

All ladies of the jChristlan 
church are urged to be present at 
the meeting next Sunday as there 
will be business of importance 
transact. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

• • 

• FLICKERTOWN * 

• ♦ 
♦♦•• ''•»'>♦ ■*•**•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦» 

Otto Snelling has yellow jaun- 



if*#r — -♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

» ISKAVER LICK. « 

► ♦ 

••♦•*••♦•••♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mr and Mrs. Robt. Green speitf. 
Junday a. Elmer Dene - 

Al.s Mary A. N'o.l. K>-t ti.-r fam- 
ily mare ona night last w:<ek. 

Leon Wilson, Wesley Brown and 
Clifford Afterk'irk have mumps. 

J. VV. Cleek was hauling f^-noa 
posts from W. C. Johnson's p. . .«, 
Monday. 

John Delehaunty is building a 
pike from his residence to the 
Big Bone and Beaver pike. 

Dr. Rylp aold John Taylor, of 
Big Bone neighborhood, five milk 
cows and calve* bust week. 

A. A. Roter and son have added 
a new Acetelyne welding outfit to 
their well equipped garage 

Rev. Criswell has been holding 
a very interesting meeting for 
about >.hree weeks at Florence. 

Miss Annie, daughter of R. Lee 
Huey, of Big Bone church neigh- 
borhood, has been employed to 
teach in the Beaver school' 

G. A. Playback and I. \v. Cleek 
sold their crop of 1550 pounds of 
tobacco at the Farmers Loose Leaf 
at Walton, at an average of -ML 

Ben Hodges and J W Cleek sold 
;he remainder of their crop of 
tobacco at the Farmers loose leaf 
last week, 5020 pounds, at an av- 
erage of $61. 



UNION. 



Born to John Snelling and wife, 
Feb. 7ih, a boy. 

Arthur Alio way lost a good 
cow one day last week. 

E. A. Grant, wife and son, A lie, 
visited John Grant Sunday 

Lee Snyder, wife and son visit- 
to ed at Sebree Bros., Sunday. 

Born to Russell Finn and wife, 



* O 

>»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦»» 

Miss Hazel Senour is visiting hi 
Erlanger. 

Jos. Kuey has gone to St. Pet- 
ersburg, Florida. 

The W. M. U. will meetwuh Mrs. 



Rev. Francis Walsh, a war chao- Feb. 7th, a seven pound girl. 



lain and professor in Mt. St. Blufe 
Marys Seminary, Cincinnati, will Sunday 
give a talk on Irish Freedom at Owen 
the entertainment at St. Paul's 
church Tuesday evening, Feb. 17. 
Moving pictures of Ireland and 
songs of Ireland will be given. 



Potts next Fridaj 

Rev Potts filled his appointment 
at Gunpowder, Sunday. 

Miss Idamae Moore spent the 
week-end with Miss Louise Feld- 



Wingate and family were haus. 



HUMS. 



♦ 
a 



guests at Wm. Burnj'. 

Utz and a Mr. Nels, of 
Newport, visited Jasper Utz and 
wife Sunday. 

Wesley Moore and wife visited 
friends in Petersburg last Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

Lucian Ryle and two of his chil- 
dren, of Greensburg, Ind., are vis- 
iting relatives here. 

James Gaines went to Dillsboro, 
Indiana, Sanitarium, last week 
take their water treatment. 



rhs Y. W. A. will meei all day 
next Thursday with Mrs. Lesli* 
Sullivan. 

Miss Louise Feldhaus has ac- 
cepted a position as bookkeeper 
in the Hicks & Senour garage. 

Mrs. John Dickerson has re- 
turned from a visit to her sister, 
Mrs. Jas. Williams, of Erlanger. 

Mrs. John Criswell is entertain- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Parsons 
and Thos. Barnes, of Berry Sta- 
to tion. 

Miss Beulah Stephens, the eldest 



James Dudgeon has a new vio- 
lin. 

Services at South Fork church 
Sunday, February 15th. 

Miss Nora Hoffman spent last 
Sunday at John Binder's. 

Born, January 30th to Charles 

^ohfT Fmlielf was" Ssact- ' MTTm^r«d"ploVd wd te^b^icommunterfbn.- 5D.) 
ing busine^ in Watlon one dav Sndyer were Sunday guests at J. 
last week. ' ,H. Snyde r's. 

Will Smith, wife and son were j ^ mm 

guests of his parents the latter ; ooooaooooooooooooooooooooo 
part of last week. i ♦ „^. __ ♦ 

Elmer Waters and Misa Gertrude ♦ fi IG BONE CHURCH News ♦ ; ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
Baker, of near Ryle, were guests ♦ ♦ ! There is a great deal of 



Robt. Snow will move to the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wood 
Cecil Burns farm this week, and , Stephens, and Lee Craddock, were 
Wm. Burns and mother will move married at the parsonage in Er- 
into the house vaeated by Snow. ' langer by Rev. T. L. Wooten, last 

Stephen Gaines and wife, F. M. I Saturday. 
Voshell and family, Ed. Maxwell ) (Please sign your name to your 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

» DEVON ♦ 



at Arch Noell's last Sunday 

Martin Allen was laid up sev- ' Rev. O. C Peyton, pastor of Big 
eral days last week as the result Bone Baptist church, has been 
of piercing one of his feet 
nail. • 

The friends of Miss 
Dudgeon surprised, her laat Satur- the courtesy of the church he will 
day night, that being 



sick- 
ness in this neighborhood. 

Miss Binder dismissed school 
here on account of the flu. 
with a compelled" on account of ill health, | Frank Af terkirk is quite aick. 
I to resign his pastorate there. He j Dr. McCollum of Erlanger, is hi* 
Frances did ao on Sunday, Feb. 1st. Thru \ physician. 

Mr. Theo. Carpenter and fam- 
her birth- abide in the parsonage for some ily spent last Sunday at W. 
day. The evening was spent in weeks to come. He feels that a 
games and playing. Refreshments long period of complete reat is 
were served v and everybody had a absolutely necessary. The "Heart 
delightful time. Miaa Frances re- to Heart Talks,'' which have prov- 
ceived several nice and useful j ed encouraging acceptance with 
presents, and all wiah her many ] our readers, will be continued for 
more such birthday occasions. the present. 



ily spei 
Woodwi 



ood ward's. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Mulberry 
are much rejoiced over the ar- 
rival of a fine son Feb. 6th. 

Mrs. Wulfeck and family, and 
Mr. Charles West and family are 
among those, suffering with flu. 



TERMS OF SALE. 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on all sums over $10.00 a credit of 
six months will be given, purchasers to give notes with approved security/ 
negotiable and payable at the Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. 
Three per cent discount for cash. 

W. L. Tipton. 

Edgar C. Riley, Auctioneer, Sale to begin at 10 a. m. 

FREE LUNCH WILL BE SERVED. 



MAPLE HILL HERD OF 

Registered Chester Whites 

Gat your hog • of tho ooarott perfect moot 
hog in th. U. S. 

'rim CIh'vUt White* wuii u out of 10 of the drtwiuid carcavw 
I>rlK«>a— «ll t>r<<«<il* •otnpating, nt both tho luiHaud iviiu latwaft- 
llouol Ml fjhlfltf I boYVt nothing but put* brad Clirwtor WJiIIvm 
ami tfefllttr* fi«" Young utook — alrod by Hattlnn' Qhoiea, * 
Ky, »H»M» Vail pcU* wtuuur, and two h« mo sows for ■«!«. 

CHESTER L TANNER, Ploxonco, Ky R. R. 

■ 



Dr. T. T. Barton 

VETERINARY 

SURGEON 

All Ca|ls Promptly Attended. 

Tweoty-one years Practice. 
Phono 733 WALTON, KY. 

What r <#ht iuiVf yuu tu tlUfMftP 
tfv' ruttui of i! iim| lf<>g tu 

bo authoitty uti tho aoatkoi t» 
he not flvlng you anoi ,<«) 

• ti.tlun uf hit w«'nto*M wUtlontf 



"He says I'm a good skate 95 

—Chesterfield 

\ REAL pal— that's Chesterfield. 
■**" at its lecord. Three million smokers- 
less than five years on the market! 
words explain it— "They Satisfy.' 

Our expert buyers in the Orient select for 
Chesterfields only the finest grade of the 
four choicest varieties of Turkish tobacco. 
To these are added the best of mild but 
full-bodied Domestic leaf. 

But, in the end, it's the blend that makes 

Chesterfields "satisfy." And the blend— our 

private formula — cannot be cooied. 

Extra wrapper of moisture-proof 
paper seals in the flavor. 



£^ J C&«4fM*h'~"(*' 




i ^m 



a*— « 



THURSDAY .FEB Kin, 1 20 



buoNE COUNTY XECOADER 



wr 



■■■■?■■■■ 



A Regrettable Affair. 

Tuesdays Cincinnati Enquirer 
carried the following editorial in 
regard to thv mob that attempt- 
ed to override law and order at 
Lexington lstst Monday. It will be 
endorsed by all who believe in the 
majisty of the law. 

'•It was not the spirit of Ken- 
tucky—a state of true sportsmen 
and chivalrous gentlemen — that 
moved the mob in the struts of 
Lexington. It was the spirit of Boi 
shevism, which seeks to rule by 
violence and in defiance of law 
and the mandates for its orderly 
execution. But it was the true 
spirit of Kentucky that faced the 
mob and in fearlessness, and with 
dispatch, stopped the disorderly 
defiance of the dignified progress 
of justice. 

"The movement of the mob was 
the expression of uncontrolled paa 
sion. Horrible as was the offense 
against which it was a protest, 
that protest was lawless and un- 
wai ranted. Tho movement of jus- 
tice was swift and sure. Convic- 
tion of the perpetrator of the hein- 
ous crime was secured in the short 
est possible time, and his execu- 
tion set for a near-by day. 

'Officials had pleaded with the 
mob; it had been warned, xnct 
had been resisted hand-to-hand 
by the soldiery summoned to pro 
tt'ct the authorities in the per- 
formance of their duties under 
the law Until the first shot 
was fired the mob was unreason- 
ing, offensive and defiant. It. was 
in no sense typical of the peo- 
ple of Kentucky, for whom it pre- 
tended to act. 

''Regrettable as it is that ao 
many lives should have been sac- 
rificed, and so many wounded be 
left to suffer, the "repulse of the 
mob was justified. The law must 
be enforced. The processes for 
the administration of justice must 
be respected. 

"There can be no approval of 
the mob, no sympathy with the 
spirit that moved it. Its leaders 
should be brought to face the 
justice they have defied and 
sought to frustrate. 

"For the officials who Btood 
bravely to their duty, and with 
patience, there must be commend- 
ation. For the soldiers who exe- 
cuted the orders given to them, 
after all persuasion had been 
shown to be ineffective, there is 
praise for the effective way in 
which they stayed the wave of 
lawlessness. They spoke the true 
spirit of Kentucky. 



« 




This space will be devoted to 
the interest of the American Le- 
gion and its members. It has been 
contributed by the editor. And 
the news of the Legion aiid its 
members will be .published week- 
ly. -Any items from members or 
friends will be appreciated and 
fihould be addressed to the Pub- 
licity Committee, Burlington, Ky., 
to arrive not later than Satur- 
day of each week. 

On Sunday February the 22, the 
Legion is planning to hold Me- 
morial services at three different 
churches in the county. At this 
time the French Government win 
present a "Memorial Diplo ma.'' to 
The next of "kTn"~bf all Boone 
county boys who lost their lives 
in the Service. We consider it a 
privilege to have this honor con- 
ferred upon us by our Ally in the 
recent great war. Announcement 
of programs and places will be 
made later. 

The dance postponed from Jan- 
uary 23, on account of the heavy 
sleet, will be given Friday Feb- 
ruary l*th, at I. 0. 0. F.. 'Hall, 
Florence, Ky. This will be our in- 
itial social event and we are de- 
pending upon the individual ef- 
forts of the members to make 
this a success. Friends of the 
members are cordially invited to 
attend. 

The department of Kentucky Is 
conducting a State wide mem- 
bership campaign at this time, 
all ex-service men are urged to 
join now. Dues are only &2.00 per 
year including American L